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Full text of "Spotlight, 1986-87"

Sunday-Monday, Aug. 24-25, 1986 

The Wiltiamsport Area Community College 

Williamsport, Pa. 17701 

Vol. 22, No. 1 
First-Day-of-Classes Issue 



from the president 

Welcome! 

Certainly now more than ever Is an exciting time to 
be part of The Williamsport Area Community College. 
This school year will mark the opening of the Advanced 
Technology and Health Sciences Center -- the 
College's commitment to new advanced technological 
career opportunities. The challenge to each new and 
returning student is to utilize this institution to insure a 
career future -- to discover your potential. 

As you head toward class you may notice many 
changes around campus that occurred this past sum- 
mer -- including spectacular progress made on the Ad- 
vanced Technology and Health Sciences Center at the 
end of Susquehanna Street. The Academic Center had 
a new roof Installed and parapet repaired. The Financial 
Aid Office underwent a complete renovation. The 
building's entire electrical system is being replaced. 
Renovation to the Technical Trades Building IV was 
completed, adding 2,407 square feet to the Technical 
Trades Center. Outdoor lighting is being installed for 
campus parking lots, and the parking lot behind the 
Building Trades Center is being paved. 

Not all the changes have been physical. The Col- 
lege's Electronics Technology Program underwent revi- 
sion, resulting in seven areas of concentration: automa- 
tion instrumentation, biomedical electronics, computer 
automation Instrumentation, biomedical electronics, 
computer automation maintenance, electronics 
engineering, fiber optic communications, laser elec- 
tronis and telecommunications. 

Three new programs in the Health Sciences Divi- 
sion are being offered for the first time this Fall: Culinary 
Arts, Dental Assisting, and Occupational Therapy Assis- 
tant. It is exciting to see programs developing now in 
anticipation of the opening of the Advanced Technology 
and Health Sciences Center. 

We are proud of the continuing growth of this Col- 
lege and we challenge you - In your academic pursuits 
- to grow with it. 

- Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College President 



SPOTLIGHT 



It's magic! It's Mime... it's lots 
of Bill Clary for first class day 

Bill Clary, comedian, author, lecturer, singer, guitarist and musician will 
lecture and perform at various locations at the College on the first day of Fall 
classes, according to Ms. Sandra Rhone, College Activities assistant. 

Ms. Rhone stated that Clary will lecture on "Stress Management" at 2 p.m. 
and on "Magic, the New Teaching Tool" at 3 p.m. Both lectures are scheduled 
for the Academic Center Auditorium. 

She added that Clary's evening show, "Magic, Music, Mystery and 
Mime," scheduled for 8 p.m. in the Susquehanna Room, LEG, is "about one 
and one-half hours of comedy, songs about college life, audience participation, 
live animals, floating things and illusions." 

In addition, Ms. Rhone stated, Clary will perform several "teasers" at 
various locations throughout the campus, including the Earth Sciences campus 
and the Susquehanna Room. 

Clary has performed with such celebrities as Carol Channing, Raquel Welch 
and Burt Reynolds. He has appeared in television commercials, motion pictures, 
and is the rave of the college circuit. 

According to Ms. Rhone, Clary appeared on more than 100 campuses, at 
60 conventions and performed over 940 shows at the "Six Flags Over Georgia" 
theme park. 

She added that Clary recently won "The 1985 Outstanding Achievemait in 
the Art of Magic" award from the president of the International Brotherhood of 
Magicians, Atlanta Society. 

In addition, Clary has lectured on over 200 campuses and teaches adult 
education courses on the same subjects. 

Ms. Rhone emphasized that ^ Qary programs are open free of charge. 

Bill Clary is being sponsored by the Student Government Association. 

Special distribution 
for Welcome Day 

The SPOTLIGHT, which usually is pubUshed on Mondays dur- 
ing the academic year, is being especially distributed on Sunday, 
Aug. 24, for Welcome Day. 

In this special preview of tomorrow's editJon, all information 
Is centered on the first day of classes: tomorrow. Therefore, in ar- 
ticles, "today" refers to Monday, "tomorrow" refers to Tuesday, 
and so on. 



On work study? 
'Must' meeting 
to be held today 

There will be a mandatory meeting 
today, Monday, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. 
for students who have been accepted in- 
to the College Work Study Program for 
the 1986-1987 academic year, according 
to Donald S. Shade, financial aid direc- 
tor. 

Shade said important forms will be 
distributed and a briefing will be given 
by financial aid staff. He added that 
class excuses will be provided for 
students who have a class conflict. 

The meeting is scheduled to be held 
in the Academic Center Auditorium. 




FOOD FOR THOUGHT: "Love 
It", "Greit", "Very Informttive", 
"I've eqjoyed H", "I rtiUy learned a 
lot". ThcM ire some of the comments 
made by slndents ibool the COPlng 
program u (hey prepared food for the 
clui picnic. They are, from front to 
back 00 the left side of the table, Ron 
Snanfler, culinary arts itodenl from 
Williamsport; RiU Cellini, coUntry 
irti ilndent from Co|tn Station; Cin- 
dy Grace, food and hospitality minige- 
ment itndent from Troy, and on the 
right tide of the table art art Sandy 
Gtphart, food and hospitilily manage- 
ment itadenl from WUUamiport, tod 
Sozino L. Beooett, food service coor- 
dioalor. 

Please See Page 4 



2DSPOTUGHTaSoiiili;/MoaiU;, Aa|. 24/25, im 






Behind the Eightball 

Are ail you pool sharks ready for the next round of games? While you were 
away this summer, keeping cool and getting your cue sticks chalked up, your 
friendly neighborhood North Central Amusement Company was getting the pool 
tables in the Rec Room in shape for the Fall semester. 

Ken Breon, the owner of NCA, said that the tables are recovered once or 
twice a year, depending on wear and tear, at a cost of $300 each. 

Santino Mistretta, NCA, re-covering the slate on a pool table. 

UJ€LCOM€ 
STUD€NTS 

Voice your opinion— join SGA 



Three bus trips scheduled 



Students interested in becoming a 
Student Government senator or in serv- 
ing on an SGA committee should direct 
their questions to the Recreation Center, 
AI37, LEC, according to Ms. Sandra 
Rhone, SGA adviser. 

Ms. Rhone stated that the purpose 
of SGA is to effectively represent the 
student body and to provide guidance 
for the student's growth both as a 
citizen and as an individual. 

She added that the SGA shows 
concern for the educational, personal, 
social and cultural development of 
students as well as providing programs 
that enhance that development. 

"The SGA provides leadership and 
communication among the students and 



the College faculty and staff," she said, 
adding that this relationship is often 
developed and maintained by having 
strong executive officers, senators and 
committee members which represent 
students in meeting their needs and con- 
cerns. 

Ms. Rhone emphasized that all 
students enrolled in credit courses at the 
College are members of SGA and arc 
encouraged to voice their opinions and 
suggestions. 

Interested persons who wish to 
become involved and to make a dif- 
ference should either contact Msr Rhone 
in the Rec Center office, or attend the 
SGA informal social scheduled for 
Tuesday, August 26, in the Le Jeune 
Chef, LEC, from 4 to 6 p.m. 



Yes, I'm Interested! 

I can be contacted at: [Complete coupon and return 
it to the Rec Room in LEC] 



Name: 



Local Address, 
Incl. ZIP 



Local Phone: 



Best times to contact: 



A SPOTLIGHT Campus Senica 



Several trips are scheduled for this semester, according to Mrs. Jo Aim R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

On October 4, a bus trip to the Baltimore Inner Harbor is scheduled. The 
bus will leave the LRC parking lot at 7 a.m. and will depart from Baltimore at 9 
p.m. Cost is S16 for College students, faculty, staff and alumni, and S18 for the 
general pubUc. 

Tbe deadline for reservations is Wednesday, September 24. Money is not 
refundable. 

Two bus trips are scheduled to go to New York City in December. Buses 
will leave the LRC parking lot on December 6 and 13 at 6 a.m., and will depart 
from New York City at 9 p.m. Cost is S20 for College students, faculty, staff and 
alumni, and S22 for the general public. 

There are limited tickets available for both of the New York trips at addi- 
tional cost for the Radio City Music Hall Christmas Show. Tickets are $23 for 
College students, faculty, staff and alumni, and $27 for the general public. 

The deadline for reservations is November 18. Money is not reftmdable. 

For reservations or information regarding any of the bus trips, call 
327-4763 or extension 7269. 

Rec Room hours 
and rules listed 

The College Recreation Center, 
located in the Lifelong Education 
Center, will be open this week 8 a.m. to 
10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 
and 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Friday, ac- 
cording to Ms. Sandra Rhone, College 
activities assistant. 

She added the Rec Center will be 
closed over the Labor Day weekend, 
and will reopen Tuesday, September 2 
at 8 a.m. 

Rec Center rules and regulations, 
as listed in the 1986-87 Student Hand- 
book, include: a validated College I.D. 
card is required to use Rec Center 
equipment; do not abuse equipment or 
the facility; no spitting; smoking 
materials are to be extinguished and 
disposed of in the proper receptacles; 
trash must be disposed of properly; in- 
dividuals and groups may not 
monopolize equipment; malfunctioning 
equipment must be reported immediate- 
ly to Rec Room staff. 

Ms. Rhone stressed that abusive 
behavior will not be tolerated, and 
disciphnary action will be taken when 
necessary. 

Don't forget 
to yalidate 
your I.D. card 

Students who have not yet obtained 
a College identification card may do so 
during the first ten days of the semester, 
according to Mrs. Jo Ann R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College activities. 

I.D. cards are processed in the 
Recreation Center, LEC, 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. After the initial 10 days of the 
semester, I.D. photographs will be 
taken for a $10 fee, Mondays, 10 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m., or by ap- 
pointment. 

Mrs. Fremiotti said that I.D. cards 
must be vahdated for the current 
semester. Validation stickers are 
available at no charge in the Rec Center. 

She emphasized that I.D. cards are 
void without the current validation. 

I.D. card validation stickers will 
also be available in the Gymnasium on 
Welcome Day. 



Complimentary 'Gift Pax' 
available to students 

Complimentary "Gift Pax" are 
available in the Gymnasium and in the 
Recreation Center on Sunday, Welcome 
Day, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

The packages, provided by Student 
Gift Pax Inc. of West Hempstead, 
N.Y., feature sample sizes of personal 
products such as toothpaste, colds 
medicine, feminine products, and after 
shave lotion. 

The packages are available - one 
kit per student ~ free of charge. 

SGA social Tuesday 

Tuesday, August 26, there will be 
an informal Student Government 
Association meeting in the Le Jeune 
Chef, LEC, 4 to 6 p.m., according to 
Ms. Sandra Rhone, SGA adviser. 

All returning SGA members and 
students who have been recommended 
to serve as SGA senators are invited to 
attend the social. 

During the meeting, interviews for 
prospective senators will be scheduled. 

Food, including Swedish meatballs 
and a fruit tray, will be served, and is 
being prepared by the students in the 
Food and Hospitality department. 

Ms. Rhone urges anyone interested 
in serving on an SGA committee attend. 

Students may get 
reduced bus rates 

VaUdated Community College ID 
cards may be used to obtitin a reduced 
rate on Williamsport City Buses, accor- 
ding to Mrs. JoArni R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

Full-time students may show their 
vahdated ID card to bus drivers to iden- 
tify their student status at the Com- 
munity College, she said and added that 
~ with the validation - no special bus 
pass is required. 

Only full-time students are eligible, 
she emphasized. 

The reduced rate, she said, is of- 
fered by the Williamsport Bureau of 
Transportation. 



Four instructors honored 
during commencement 

Four College faculty members received distinguished teaching honors during 
last May's commencement activities, according to Mrs. Elaine J. Lambert, m- 
terim director of communications. 

According to Mrs. Lambert, Richard J. Weilminster, associate professor of 
horticulture, was named Master Teacher for the 1985-86 academic year. 
Weilminster has worked for the college for 14 years. 

In the past, Weilminster served as program chairman and regional 
chairman and is presently a member of the state board of directors of the Penn- 
sylvania Nurseryman's Association. 

Weilminster earned an associate of applied science degree in horticulture 
and landscape design in 1965 from the State University of New York at Farm- 
ingdale, a bachelor's degree in horticulture in 1967 from the University of 
Georgia, and a master's degree in ornamental horticulture in 1972 from the Pen- 
nsylvania State University. 

The Master Teaching Award is the highest level of recognition awarded to 
faculty by the College. 

Three College faculty members received Excellence in Teaching Awards: 
James E. Temple, instructor, electrical construction; Gary R. Knebel, instructor, 
computer science, and Phillip D. Landers, associate professor , business ad- 
ministration. 

Employed by the College since 1982, Knebel earned a bachelor's degree in 
engineering and mechanical engineering from Columbia College and a master's 
degree in mechanical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Landers has been with the College for 18 years. He holds a bachelor's 
degree in business education from Bloomsburg State College and a master's 
degree in business administration from Michigan State University. 

The Distinguished Teaching Awards process is conducted each spring, and 
honors full-time faculty members who demonstrate excellence in instruction and 
outstanding service to students. Nominations are provided by students, faculty, 
administration, alumni and other members of the College community. 

Bookstore lists special hours; 
refund, check policies summarized 

The College Bookstore will be open evening hours as well as the usual 
daytime hours starting today, Monday, Aug. 25 and continuing to Sept. 5, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Eleonore R. Holcomb, Bookstore supervisor. 
The hours are: 

Monday-Thnrsday 

8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

Friday 

8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. only. 

On Labor Day, the Bookstore will be closed. 

Mrs. Holcomb reviewed policies: 

Checks are to be made payable to "W.A.C.C. Bookstore" for the amount 
of purchase and ID must be provided. 

A receipt is required for all refunds. There will be a full refund for books in 
new condition and half for marked books. 

Refunds will be given on Fridays only from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
The final day for refunds will be Friday, Sept. 12. 



SPOTUGHTDSiailtr/Moadi;, A>|. 24/25, IfMOj 



Integrated Studies update 



Several changes and course additions to the Integrated Studies division have 
been instituted for the Fall, according to Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, division director. 

According to Dr. Doyle, the series of courses titled Western Civilization no 
longer exist. Instead, a new course called World Civilization I is being offered, 
which will provide students with a global perspective more relevant to today's 
needs. 

A new course, Latin American Civilization is also available. This course. 
Dr. Doyle stated, "will provide more than the traditional, narrow view of the 
U.S. or Europe." 

Government courses are now being abbreviated PSC for Political Science, 
rather than GOV. This, Dr. Doyle reasons, is because government is more than 
just organizational structure. It is "the study of power." 

Human Anatomy and Physiology Survey, a four-credit course, replaces two 
three-credit courses. The addition of a lab will, according to Dr. Doyle, 
"enhance student learning and provide hands-on experience that will be 
valuable..." 




FACE LIFT... A mue of scaffolding fronts wing of (he Academic Center. 
"Hefty" chute iDows brick work from ledge to be safely lowered to waiting 
recepUcle. fSPOTLIGHT Photo by Donna L TrimbleJ 

Student receives In-Plant Printers 
Miller Memorial Scholarship Award 

Barbara L. Rearick, of Montoursville, was recently awarded the 1986-1987 
Susquehanna In-Plant Printers' James N. Miller Memorial Scholarship Award, 
according to Mrs. Elaine J. Lambert, mterim director of communications. 

The $250 award is presented annually to a student enrolled in the graphic 
arts program by the Susquehanna In-Plant Printers' Association -which is a 
group of managers, printers, instructors, and sales representatives involved in 
graphic arts throughout the Susquehanna Valley. 

The student currently holds a 4.00 cumulative average and is entering her 
second year of studies at the Community College. 

Instructor teaches nationally 

Dr. Dennis Ringling, associate professor of forest technology, was selected 
last May by Performance Learning Systems, of Emerson, N.J., to teach three 
graduate courses on teacher and administrator effectiveness. 

Dr. Ringling taught at Alabama A & M University, Huntsville; Salem Col- 
lege, Charleston, West Virginia; and St. Thomas College in St. Paul, Minnesota, 
in June, July and August, respectively. 

Dr. Ringhng, of Muncy, is an instructor in the College's Secondary Voca- 
tional Program. 

The SPOTLIGHT 
seeks new members 

Students wishing to obtain prac- 
tical experience in the field of mass com- 
munications should contact the adviser 
of the SPOTLIGHT, Anthony N. CiUo, 
associate professor of journalism. 

The SPOTLIGHT offers ex- 
perience in print journalism, 
photography, layout and design and 
advertising. 

The SPOTLIGHT is located in the 
Academic Center basement, room 7. 



Nurse's hours pven 

The StDdenI Health Services 
Offlce, in Room 104, Gym- 
nasinm, is open from 8 to 3:30 
p.m. daily Monday Ihrongb Fri- 
day. 

Mrs. Janet R. Qoerimit, a 
rtgistered nurse, is ivailabk to 
care for minor illnesses and in- 
juries as well at referrals. 

Student insurance informa- 
UoD may be obtained from the 
nurse's office. 



The SPOTLIGHT 
The SPOTLIGHT is published 
each Monday of the academic 
year by Journalism, mass com- 
munications, and other Interested 
students. Office: Room 7, base- 
ment. Academic Center 
Telephone (717) 326-3761, 
College Extension 7221 . 

The SPOTLIGHT Is a 
member of the Columbia 
Scholastic Press Association 

Staff this Issue. Kathy L 
Cobb, Donna L Trimble, and 
Brenda M VIbert 



Library hours posted 

The Learning Resources Center will 
be open the following hours this 
semester, Monday through Thursday, 8 
a.m. to 9 p.m., Fridays, 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m., according to Mrs. Kate D. 
Hickey, director of the LRC. 

Mrs. Hickey added that beginning 
September 7, Sunday hours will be 2 to 
9 p.m. 

She emphasized that students need 
a validated I.D. card to borrow 
materials. 

The library will be closed over 
Labor Day weekend. 



4aSPOTUGHTDSudi;/Mo»lir, Ai|. M/25, l«M 

Summer COPing a huge success 



The CoUege summer COPing pro- 
gram was attended by 28 students this 
year, according to Mrs. Calvetta A. 
Walker, ACT 101 instructional 
specialist, malcing it the "largest, best 
group of students we've ever had." 

According to Mrs. Walker, the 
primary focus of the COPing program is 
to better prepare students for their first 
semester of school, through discussions 
with counselors, individual tutoring, 
social and cultural events and special 
emphasis from Dean R. Foster, director 
of developmental studies. 

Students attend a four-week ses- 
sion, during which they are exposed to a 
two-week course flow of math, English, 
reading and career/human development. 
They also attend "survival seminars" 
which orient them to the campus, in- 
cluding areas such as financial aid. Col- 
lege activities, career development, the 
Tutoring Center, and the Library. 

During the last two weeks of the 
program, according to Mrs. Walker, 
students are given the opportunity to 
gain practical experience in their cur- 
riculum areas. 

Students also attend weekly socials, 
which give them a chance to meet new 
people. This summer, the group travell- 




Mitl Elfferl, of Troy; "It helps lo 
know people and teachers before you 
start so yon're not overwhelmed. Yoo 
know your way around campoi." 



ed to Oyde PeeUng's Reptileland in 
AUenwood, where they were given a 
"touching experience." An experienced 
attendant discussed and handled reptiles 
such as tortoises, crocodiles, alligators, 
Blue-Tongued Skinks, King snakes. 
Boas and Pythons. 

The group also travelled the Sus- 
quehanna River on the Hiawatha, an 
old-fashioned, paddle-wheeled river- 
boat. During the one and one-half hour 
cruise, the group Ustened to a taped 
history of the Hiawatha and lore of the 
area, including tales of lumber barons 
and Indian massacres. 

At the end of the last week of the 
program, the students attended a picnic 
at Little Pine Creek State Park. The 
food was prepared by students in the 
Food and Hospitality department. 

Mrs. Walker stated, "The pro- 
gram was very successful. This summer 
we had a very enthusiastic group." 

Students who attend the program 
must be financially eligible and must 
show a need for academic support. 

The COPing program is funded 
through Pennsylvania's Higher Educa- 
tion Equal Opportunity Program (ACT 
101). 



^., 



I 



pv * 



Gregory Root, of Wellsboro: "It 
gets yoD geared up for classes menallly 
and physically. I expect II to Improve 
my grades." 





Joel Johnion, of Wellsboro: 
"Great progrtio. It reiUy helped me 
learn new study hibiti." 



SPOTLIGHT Photos 

by 
Donoa L. Trimble 



Mrs. CalvetU A. Walker, Act 101 
instmclional specliliit, shows Ron 
Snauffer about "COPing" on a dif- 
ferent Kale. 




ENJOYING the Susquehanna River from aboard the Hiawatha are students 
from the COPing program. From left are Lucille Keener, of TurbotriUe; Mary 
Button, of WiiUamsport, and Elizabeth Seebold, of Willianuport. 
ISPOTUGHT Photo by Donna L TrimbleJ 



Indian Park project: 
"Real job site" 



SPOTUGHTBSndiy/Moidir, Aig. 24/25, IMtoS ' 



Glenn Greasy, a service and opera- 
tion student from Bloomsburg, operates 
a drag line. He wishes the job could be 
year 'round as "it's a real job site," not 
just a training course. Greasy said that 
once you know how to operate a drag 
line and can handle the load, the next 
step to crane operator is easy. 





Fran Dincher, a service and opera- 
tion student from Williamsport, 
operates a front end loader. He said, 
"You get a chance to learn both 
operating and repairing equipment. 
[The College] is the only school on the 
east coast that teaches both mechanical 
repair and operating. It's also the only 
school in the area that has a drag 
machine to learn on." 



The dirt is dredged up from the 
pond by the drag line and scooped up 
by the front end loader. It is then used 
to make a road by these graders. The 
road is being put in for the borough of 
Montoursville. The project was expected 
to be completed at the end of the sum- 
mer session. However, more work was 
involved than originally anticipated, so 
a dozen students were called back to 
finish the job. 




6aSPOTLIGBTaSiiDdar/MoBili;, Ai|. 14/25, ItM 

A dvanced technologies 
programs available 

The Electronics Technology program has been revised, according to Mrs. 
Elaine J. Lambert, interim director of communications. As a result, advanced 
technologies such as laser electronics, fiber optics pstd telecommunications are 
available to students this Fall. 

Mrs. Lambert said that the new curriculum offers a common core of elec- 
tronics courses, as well as seven areas of concentration from which each student 
may choose a specialization. 

She added that because of the changes, students will be able to learn the 
essential fundamentals required for a wide range of job opportunities while in- 
creasing those competencies identified as most crucial to future technological 
development and viable employment. 

The seven areas of concentration include automation instrumentation, 
biomedical electronics, computer automation maintenance, electronics engineer- 
ing, fiber optic communications, laser electronics and telecommunications. 

Mrs. Lambert said that the program facilities are scheduled to move into 
the new Advanced Technology and Health Sciences Center, which is expected to 
be completed by the Spring 1987 semester. 

She added that the program revisions were made in response to the needs of 
modem industry. Local industries such as GTE, Coming Glass and AT&T/Bell 
Laboratories have already expressed a need for technicians trained in these ad- 
vanced technologies, as weU as offering their support and assistance in the pro- 
gram development. 



Susquehanna Room Info: 
Hours, Meal Plan, Menu... 




HOURS 
Monday through Thurtday... 

Breakfast, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 
Lunch, 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p m 
Dinner, 2:30 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. 
Friday... 

Breakfast, 7 a.m. to 10:30 am 
Lunch, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Saturday and Sunday... 
1 1 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



Tho Sandwich Bar will be open Monday through Friday (rem 1 0:30 a.m. 
to 1 :30 p.m., serving a variety of hot and cold hoagles Including steak, 
meatball, and hot sausage. 

SPECIAL NOTE FOR THIS WEEK'S HOURS 
Th* Suaquahanna Room will tw closing Friday, Aug. 28, at 3 
p.m. W* will b* clotad Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. W« will 
reopen Tuaaday, Sept. 2 at 7 a.m. 

MEAL PLAN APPLICANTS 

Deadline for applying: Sept. 8, 1 986 

Place to apply: Susquehanna Room B-136 

Time to apply: 9:30 to 1 1 a.m., Monday through Friday. 

Items required: completed application, completed disclosure state- 
ment, check or money order v^lth Social Security number on It or finan- 
cial aid date, and ID card. 

MEAL PLAN CARDHOLDERS 

Card PlckUp... Susquehanna Room 8-136 

2:30 to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 



Menu/This Week 



Today, Monday 

Lunch: Manhattan steak, gravy, 
potatoes and vegetable. $2.39; Breast 
of turkey, potatoes and veaetab le 
$259 

Soup: Com chowder, beel noodle. 

Dinner: Roast top round beel, gravy, 
potatoes, and vegetable, $2.89^ 
Spaghetti and meatballs, ttellan bread, 
$2 49 

Tuesday 

Franks and aauerkraut, potatoes, or 
vegetables, $2 19; Chicken nuggets, 
potato and vegetable, $2 59 

Soup Chicken rice. Chill 
Wtdnesday 

Lunch: RIgatoni, meatball, Italian 
bread, $2 29; Shrimp, tried rice eaaroll 
$2.69 ' 

Soup: Ham and bean, Cream of broc- 



coli 

Dinner Baked ham steak, raisin 
sauce, potatoes, vegetable, $2,89; Pan- 
cakes and sausage. $2.59. 
Thursdsy 

Lunch: MeaMoaf, gravy, potato and 
vegetable, $2.39, Macaroni and cheese 
vegetable, $2.29 

Soup: Beet barley. Tomato rice 

Dinner: Ravioli and pork cutlet, Italian 
bread, $2 89; Fried chicken, potatoes, 
vegetable, $2 69 

Friday 

Lunch; Chel salad, price posted; 
Turkey pot pie. vegetable, price posted 

Soup Cream ol mushroom, 
Minestrone. 

Dinner: Cube steak, potatoes, 
vegetable, price posted; Neptune platter, 
potatoes, vegetable, price posted 



It's new... Pickle Ball to begin 
today; Open Gym hours listed 

The Intramurals/Extramurals Office plans to introduce "a new and exciting 
game" called Pickle Ball, according to Ms. Margot R. Bayer, evening College 
activities assistant. 

In fact, Ms. Bayer said, the Pickle Ball Mixed Doubles Touraament will 
begin this Wednesday, Aug. 27. Registration is being held in the Recreation 
Center in the Lifelong Education Center. 

Open Gym boon listed 
She also reported that Open Gym hours during the first week of classes will 
be from 4 to 10 p.m. The times are subject to change, she added. 

A karate exhibition is scheduled for 7 p.m., Sept. II, in the gymnasium. 

Weight Room rcDOTited 
In addition, Ms. Bayer said that a new club is being formed: The Karate 
Sport Club will meet every Monday and Thursday in the gymnasium. 

Ms. Bayer said she is inviting all students, staff, and faculty to visit the 
newly-renovated Weight Room on the first floor of the gym. 

She said, "Over the summer, we have renovated and also put in some new 
and up-to-date equipment. I will be having clinics to educate all participants on 
how to use the equipment and also to start a personal training program." 

Ms. Bayer said she urges anyone with an interest in sports or with questions 
about any of the sports programs to visit her newly-located office in Room 209, 
Gymnasium. Her hours are 1:30 to 10 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays, and 
5 to 9 p.m., Sundays. Her telephone extension is 7416. 



Three new programs offered 



Three new programs being offered 
this fall include culinary arts, dental 
assisting and occupational therapy assis- 
tant, according to Mrs. Elaine J. 
Lambert, interim director of com- 
munications. 

These new programs are ad- 
ministered by the Health Sciences divi- 
sion. Mrs. Davie Jane Nestarick is divi- 
sion director. 

The two-year culinary arts program 
prepares students in fine food prepara- 
tion. Students receive practical ex- 
perience in modem food service 
laboratories, with a variety of cuisines 
and techniques. Graduates are prepared 
to enter one of the largest occupational 
groups in our nation's work force as 
chefs and cooks. 

The one-year dental assisting pro- 
gram oreoares students to become cer- 



tified dental assistants and serve as key 
members of a dental care team. Cer- 
tification allows mobility and oppor- 
tunities for career advancement not 
available to most on-the-job trained 
dental assistants. Intensive clinical ex- 
perience in the CoUege's own dental 
care facility is a key component of the 
curriculum. 

Occupational therapy assistant 
provides instruction in the promotion, 
reinforcement, restoration and 
maintenance of health through the use 
of purposeful activity. Upon completion 
of the two-year program, students are 
eligible to take the National Certifica- 
tion Examination administered by the 
American Occupational Therapy 
Association. Certification is required by 
many employers as evidence of profes- 
sional competence. 



Late Item: More Job Ops 

Canteen Vending Company needs truck drivers for a Lock haven 
delivery every day 7 to 9:15 a.m. Could use person longer in the day if 
schedule permits. Afternoons, person needed for inside clean-up work; 
would need to drive a vehicle occasionally. Call Joe Keirstead at 322-4608 
for interview, more information. 

Needed - Natural Resources Management student to work in that 
vicinity two to eight hours a week mowing the lawn and maintaining a 
greenhouse. $3 per hour. Call John Fisher at 547-6774. 



College and staff honored 
for Fire College programs 



The College and several of its staff 
members were recognized last May by 
the Pennsylvania Fire Academy for sup- 
port of file training programs in a 38 
county area, according to Mrs. Elaine J. 
Lambert, interim director of com- 
munications. 

Mrs. Lambert said that for IS 
years the College has supported the 
programs, administered by the Penn- 
sylvania Fire Academy, by providing 
personnel, management, fmancial 
assistance and funding for fire instruc- 
tors that conduct the programs. Fire 
College Weekend is hosted by the Col- 
lege each October, and is scheduled for 
October 4 and 5 of this year. 

Certificates of appreciation were 
given to College staff members Grant L. 
Martin, coordinator of service agency 
and certification programs; Mrs. Bar- 



bara A. Danko, director of Ufelong 
education; Dr. James P. Rice, associate 
dean for educational advancement; and 
Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College presi- 
dent. 

According to Mrs. Lambert, the 
State Local Level Fire Training Pro- 
gram initially started 15 years ago with 
three programs and 81 students. Today 
there are 300 programs and 13,100 
students registered for fire training pro- 
grams offered by the College. 

She added that the program has 
serviced over 100,000 students in the 
State Local Level Fire Training Pro- 
gram since 1971, and that the College 
has funded over 4,000 programs in 
which fire department personnel have 
been educated in fire management, sup- 
pression and prevention to better serve 
the community at minimal cost. 




DUMPING DEBRIS down chnte u work progreued on Academic Ceoter this 
sanuner. 







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1AKECARE 

OFTOUR 

LUNGS. 

THEY'KE 

ONLY 

HUMAN. 

^ AMERICAN 
31 LUNG 
1 ASSOCIATION 

• The ChnslmasSeal People'*' 


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SPOTUGHTaSudiy/MoBda;, Aag. 24/25, l9Ma7 

College awards $20 thousand 
in scholarships this year 

The College recently awarded scholarships in the amount of $500 each to 
twenty returning students and twenty incoming students for the 1986-87 school 
year. 

According to Donald S. Shade, director of financial aid, students were 
selected on the basis of academic achievement, leadership abihties, extra- 
curricular activities and letters of recommendation. 

The recipients are: Karen L. Bird, Muncy; Barry D. Blumquist, Mon- 
toursville; Richard L. Bolton, Turbotville; Gary R. Bnmgard, Williamsport; 
Kathy L. Cobb, Williamsport; David E. Colver, Easton; Kenneth T. Dudek' 
Williamsport; WiUiam J. Fritz, Homer City; Gregory M. Gobrecht, Hanover- 
Pamela J. Hestor, Sehnsgrove. ' 

Susan R. Kallansrud, WiUiamsport; Linda M. Morgan, Montoursville; Da- 
neen M. Oldt, New Berlin; Robert D. Shoop, East Waterford; Paul J. Stilp, 
Williamsport; Jeanne M. Svec, Williamsport; David J. Thorp, Grampian; Susan 
L. Tomko, Columbia Crossroads; Christopher V. Wey, Dewart; Timothy 
Wirt, Hemdon. 

Randy R. Adams, Sugar Run; Deborah A. BaUiet, HoUidaysburg; Karen L. 
Boyles, Montoursville; William C. Calvert, Duncansville; Scott P. Danow, 
Towanda; Sheri M. Entz, Selinsgrove; Susan L. Gorman, Monioeton; Renae l! 
Hoover, Forksville; Richard C. Hoflinan, Sipesville; Robb L. Kimble 
Bellefonte. 

Brett J. Koontz, Wysox; Michael S. Lupoid, Loganton; Kurt G. Parrish, 
Forksville; Jennifer I. Price, Dushore; Suzanne D. Robinson, Wyalusing; 
Michelle A. Schuler, Wilhamsport; Thomas L. Sell, Duncansville; Denise M. 
Sherman, Wellsboro; Teresa L. Stiles, Ulysses; Eric E. Wolfgang, Gordon. 

Former trustee Dr. Breuder named 
dies during summer to advisory board 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, Communi- 
ty College president, recently was nam- 
ed to serve as a member of the advisory 
board for the North East Tier Advanced 
Technology Center (NET/ATC) of the 
Ben Franklin Partnership Program, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Elaine J. Lambert, in- 
terim director of communications. 

The Ben Franklin Partnership Pro- 
gram encourages economic development 
in Pennsylvania. 

Its focus, aaording to Mrs. 
Lambert, is to bring together business, 
industrial, public, and educational sec- 
tors to develop and apply advanced 
technologies which will strengthen ex- 
isting firms and stimulate the formation 
of new companies. 



Edward J. Durrwachter, 74, a 
fonner trustee of the Community Col- 
lege, died Sunday, July 6, in the Leader 
Nursing Center, Williamsport. 

Mr. Durrwachter served on the 
Community College Board of Trustees 
for 10 years and was given the honorary 
title of secretary emeritus after his 
resipation in 1985. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, Communi- 
ty College president, noted that Durr- 
wachter was instrumental in the mid-60s 
metamorphasis of the Williamsport 
Technical Institute becoming the 
Williamsport Area Community College. 

Mr. Durrwachter was active in 
community service. He received a na- 
tional honor from the Grange in 1982 in 
recognition of his leadership in local 
education. 
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NOTHING IMPRESSES AN 

EMPLOYER UKE 
DROPPING OUT OF SCHOOL. 

After years of intense study, a lot of college graduates finally leam 
something. They're not qualified for the job they want 

That's why there's a nabonwide program for college students called 
Cooperative Educatioa It allows students to alternate studies at the 
college of their choice with paid, practical work experience in the career 
of their choice. 

To participate, you don't need to fit into any particular socio- 
economic group. You don't need to be a straight "A" student either AD 
you really need to be, is smart enough to leave school 

CO'OP Education 

You earn a future when you earn a degree. 

f^l\ For a free booklet write: Coop EduottKin • P.O. Box 999 • Boston. MA 02115 



SaSPOnJCHTDSiidiymioidij, Aij. 24/15,I»M 



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ops 



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SPECIAL PAGE FOR STUDENT GROUPS 

Any Slndenl Orginiutloii wiihing to hive to innonncemcnl tbool 
recrnitDent, finl meeting, etc., ihoold gel the infonnidon to the 
SPOTLIGHT offke, Room 7, buement, Acidemic Center, no later than 
tomonow at noon! 

MEETINGS 

Student Government Association... Informal social, 4 to 6 p.m., tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Aug. 26, Le Jeune Chef, Lifelong Education Center. 
SPECIAL EVENTS 

Welcome Day... 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 24, all areas of the Col- 
lege. 

Stress Management... a lecture by Bill Clary, 2 p.m., today, Monday, Aug. 
25, Academic Center Auditorium. 

Magic, the New Teaching Tool... a lecture by Bill Clary, 3 p.m., today, 
Monday, Aug. 25, Academic Center Auditorium. 

Magic, Music, Mystery and Mime... performei by Bill Clary, 8 p.m., to- 
day, Monday, Aug. 25, Susquehanna Room. 

IM Sporti/ActlTitles 

Just what is "pickle ball"? She's not saying, but you can find out... 
Pickle Ball Mixed Doubles Tournament... Sip-up deadline is this 
Wednesday, Aug. 27. Sign up in Room At37, Lifelong Education Center. 

Employment Opportunities 

litformation supplied by College Placement Office; questions should be 
directed to that office. 

Pill-time drlTcn... Pudgies Pizza, 912 Washington Blvd., applicants must 
own vehicle. Paid per hour plus delivery commissions. Interested persons should 
contact Chuck at 322-4747. 

Bibyiitter... needed from 3:15 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. for three children aged 
6, 7, and 9. Must be a non-smoker. Call Diane before 2 p.m. at 326-2623. 

Sileiperaon... The Beverage Bam, 2062 Lycoming Creek Road. Daytime 
shift, would operate a computerized cash register and occasionally run a forklift. 
This is full-time opening and would be suitable for co-op for an evenmg student. 
Call Helen Meyer at 326-0476 or send a resume 



Two Foundation 
members honored 



Two members of the College's 
Foundation Board of Directors, James 
E. Short, founder and president of Jesco 
Athletic Company, and Albert R. Styr- 
cula, president of Valley Farms, Inc., 
were among 115 entrepreneurs honored 
in a special report by the Pennsylvania 
Chamber of Commerce in July. 

Portraits of the selected en- 
trepreneurs appeared on the cover of the 
Chamber's 1986 Annual Report. 

Short, who serves as the vice presi- 
dent of the College Foundation Board, 
was also presented an honorary degree 
from the College during commencement 
exercises in May. 

According to Mrs. Elaine J. 
Lambert, ' interim director of com- 
munications, Styrcula's "keen 
knowledge of the dairy industry and his 
desire for growth have been the driving 
forces behind his company's continued 
success." 



Williamsport Players plan 
four plays on campus 

The Williamsport Players will perform four nationally recognized plays on 
the Community College campus this academic year, aaording to Mrs. JoAnn R. 
Fremiottj, coordinator of College activities. 

"That Championship Season", a Pulitizer Prize winning work by Jason 
Miller, will be directed by Frank Fedele. 

Open auditions will be held this Tuesday and Thursday, Aug. 27 and 28, in 
the Academic Center Auditorium, from 7 to 9 p.m. 

Performance dates are Oct. 17, 18, 19, 24, and 25, in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. 

'Amtbl' in December 

"Amahl and the Night Visitors", a children's opera by Giancarlo Mennot- 
ti, will be directed by David Bailey. 

Open auditions for a variety cast will be held Sept. 23 and 24 in the 
Academic Center Auditorium from 7 to 9 p.m. 

Performance dates are Dec. 13 and 14 in Academic Center 
'The Odd Coople' In the Spring 

According to Mrs. Fremiotti, "The Odd Couple" (female version) by NeU 
Simon and "The Hostage" by Brehan Behan are scheduled for Spring 1987 per- 
formances. Additional information will be reported as it becomes available, she 
said. 

Mrs. Fremiotti stated that the cost for individual tickets will be $3 for Com- 
munity College students, faculty, and staff, and J5 for the pubUc. Season tickets, 
permitting admission to all four presentations, will cost $10 for Community Col- 
lege students, faculty, and staff, and $18 to the public. 

Tickets will be available in the Recreation Center in the Lifelong Education 
Center. 

Mrs. Fremiotti emphasized that all dates and productions are subject to 
change without notice. 

She said that questions and reservations should be directed to the Recrea- 
tion Center, Extension 7763. 



Bradshaw 
appointed 
to committee 

William C. Bradshaw, director of 
Experiential Learning, was appointed 
this summer to the Legislative Affairs 
Committee of the Cooperative Educa- 
tion Association, according to Mrs. 
Elaine J. Lambert, interim director of 
communications. 

The committee, in its role of liason 
between Congress and other legislative 
groups, recently monitored the suc- 
cessful passage of reauthorization of the 
Higher Education Act in which Con- 
gress made known its continuing sup- 
port for cooperative education and is 
currently monitoring the Act's ap- 
propriation process. 

Previously, Bradshaw served as 
Pennsylvania chairperson for the 
Association's "Education Congress In- 
itiative" in support of the cooperative 
education provisions of the Higher 
Education Act. 

The Association maintains an of- 
fice in Washington and represents over 
600 major employers and higher educa- 
tion institutions throughout the United 
States and its territories. 

Bradshaw is from Mansfield. 



NOTIFICATION 

OF 

NONDISCRIMINATION 

[Published as a College 
service by The SPOTLIGHT] 

The Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College otters vocational 
programs In health, trade and In- 
dustrial occupations. The College 
has an Open Admissions policy 
with the exception of certain 
health science programs which 
are listed In the College catalog. 
The Williamsport Area Communi- 
ty College will not discriminate on 
the basis of age, sex. handicap, 
race, religion, creed, national 
origin, color, or political atfillatlon 
In Its admissions procedures, 
educational programs and ac- 
tivities or employment practices 
as required by Title VI, Title IX 
and Section 504. 

For Information regarding 
civil rights or grievance pro- 
cedures, contact Lawrence W. 
Emery Jr., Title IX and Section 
504 Coordinator, In Room 157, 
LRC, The Williamsport Area 
Community College, 1005 West 
Third Street, Williamsport, Penn- 
sylvania 17701-5799. Telephone 
(717) 327-4765. For Information 
regarding services, activities, 
programs and facilities that are 
accessible to and. usuable by 
handicapped persons, contact 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., Section 
504 Coordinator at the above ad- 
dress and phone number. 

This notification will be on 
file In braille and on audio tape In 
the following offices at The Col- 
lege: Financial Aid, Room 201, 
Academic Center; Admissions 
Office, Room 104, Academic 
Center; Advisement and Career 
Services, Room 157. Learning 
Resources Center, and Secon- 
dary Vocational Programs, Room 
234, Technical Trades Center (In- 



W¥M\-<^ ARCHIVfTf 



SPOTLIGHT 

Tiodtr, Sept. 2, 19U • Vol. 22, No. 2 • 4 Pt|ct 
wmiuiport Ana Coiuialt; CoOne • WUUuiiMrt, Pi. 17701 



Bank provides $10,000 to help area students 




BOOK BUYIN' - StndenU lined ap in the corridor ooliide the Bookitorc faut week 
to get texts for the temerter. Boolutore hu ipcdal honn; we itory, page 2. 



Welcome Day 

'successful': 

Schuman 

On Sunday, Aug. 24, Welcome 
Day 1986 was attended by over 2,000 
students and parents, according to 
Chester D. Schuman, director of admis- 
sions and College activities - making it 
one of the most successful orientations 
ever. 

According to Schuman, the pro- 
gram provided an opportunity for 
students to become familiar with the 
campus or to attend to any last minute 
details before classes began. 

Attendence was not mandatory. 

The program ran from 11 a.m. to 2 
p.m. and was held at the Main Campus. 

The faculty was on hand to answer 
questions and concerns. 

Students were able to arrange for 
on-campus parking, validate College ID 
cards, purchase boob and supplies, 
locate classrooms, and process 
guaranteed student loans at the cashier's 
office. 

John G. Vitali, supervisor of food 
services operation, was responsible for 
serving a picnic lunch for students and 
parents. 

Schuman added "Everyone I talk- 
ed to thought it was a big success. The 
staff and students were well pleased." 



Construction on building 
ahead of schedule 



Construction on the Advanced 
Technology and Health Sciences Center 
is ahead of schedule, according to Dr. 
James P. Rice, associate dean for 
educational advancement. 

"Qasses will officially begin in Fall 
1987, keeping us on the timeUne,"Dr. 
Rice stated. 

He stated that the contractor has 
hinted that the building might be com- 
pleted substantially earlier, which would 
give the college additional time to work 
out the logistics of moving faculty,fur- 



niture and equipment mto the building. 
"We have also captured substantial 
resources to meet the challenge of get- 
ting it up and running," he said, reffer- 
ing to grants such as a S135,346 cur- 
riculum development grant, a 
$1,176,374 instructional equipment 
grant, and a {39,223 personnel develop- 
ment grant. 

"We're looking forward to the of- 
ficial opening of the Center," he 
remarked. 



WWAS organizational meeting Sept. 4 

An organizational meeting for WWAS-FM, the College's student-operated 
FM radio station, will be held at 4 p.m. this Thursday in the broadcasting office, 
Room B104, Lifelong Education Center. 

The meeting is open to all newly-enrolled broadcasting students as well as to 
anyone interested in taking part in the station's operation, according to Harry J. 
Rogers, WWAS public relations/promotions director. 

The station is expected to begin broadcasting later this month. 

SPOTLIGHT 'open office day' today 

The SPOTLIGHT today will hold an "open office day" from 2 to 4 p.m. 
so anyone interested in joining may "stop by" to ask questions, according to 
Anthony N. Cillo, faculty adviser. The office is in Room 7, lower level, 
Academic Center. 



The Commonwealth Bank and 
Trust Company, N.A. will provide 
$10,000 in tuition reimbursement funds 
for 12 full-time students and one part- 
time student during the 1986-87 school 
year, according to Donald S. Shade, 
director of financial aid. 

Shade said that the maximum 
benefit per student would be $808 per 
year. 

Applicants must be enrolled in a 
degree or a certificate program at the 
college and demonstrate residency for a 
12'month period in the area serviced by 
the bank. This includes residents of 
Bradford, Clinton, Lycoming, Mon- 
tour, Northumberland, Tioga, Union, 
Centre, Potter and Columbia Counties. 
14 telected 

Shade said Commonwealth has 
placed no restrictions on the students' 
choice of curriculum. 

Fourteen students were recently 

selected by the Financial Aid Office as 

eligible to receive the tuition su'osidies 

for the current semester. They are: 

iBa Please turn to Page 3 

PBL book sale 

begins; drive 

for members opens 

Phi Beta Lambda, the College 
business fraternity, has begun its 13th 
annual used book sale in Room 3, lower 
level. Academic Center, according to-* 
Paul W. Goldfeder, faculty adviser. 

"Returning students are encourag- 
ed to bring all their used books to the 
PBL office for resale," the adviser 
said. 

He added, "Be sure to check the 
shelves before you buy your books to 
see if you can get them at reduced 
rates." 

It's the Iifgest 

Goldfeder said Phi Beta Lambda is 
the largest national business club in the 
country - with affihates on 400 college 
campuses. 

Recruiting for membership in the 
local organization begins today and 
continues through Friday, Sept. 12. 

AppUcations are available in the 
PBL office or in Goldfeder's office, 
Room 305, Academic Center. 

The date of the group's first open 
meeting will be announced later, he 
said. 



laSrOTUGBTDTMadi;, 8«pl. 2, I'U 



Three voc/ed grants available 



Three vocational/educational 
grants have evolved from the College 
Advisement Center, aaording to Ms. 
Nancy C. Beightol, one of the center's 
grant coordinators. 

The grants will make training 
possible for single parent homemalcers, 
handicapped individuals, and those who 
wish to explore careers in non- 
traditional occupations. 
Single pirtnl homemiken 

Ms. Beightol said that single parent 
homemakers will benefit from a S90,000 
grant which will provide guidance and 
training in career planning and/or entry 
into college. 

"The purpose of this grant is to 
help individuals move from personal ad- 
justment to career planning, and thus 
entry into school or work," she said. 

The grant will assist 370 individuals 
who Uve in the Lycoming and Clinton 
County areas. Of that total, Ms. 
Beightol expects approximately 50 to 
enter into college education. 

The criteria expected of individuals 
who apply for the grant include; single 
parents must be unmarried, legally 
separated from their spouse, and must 
have custody or joint custody of at least 
one minor child. 

Other requirements include: the ap- 
plicant must be an adult homemaker 
who has worked without pay to care for 
a home or family and whose resources 
and marketable skills have diminished. 

"This program will allow such in- 
dividuals to exeim'oe career alternatives, 
" Ms. Beightol said. 

The CoUege will provide guidance 
services, which include career planning, 
vocational asssessment, conununica- 
tions skills, value clarification, defini- 
tion of marketable skills, stress manage- 
ment and personal and financial 
management. Individuals will ex- 
perience classroom activities and hands- 
on experience in College shops. 

Flower show 
to be held 

The Duboistown Garden Qub will 
present a flower show in Le Jeune Chef, 
Lifelong Education Center, on Friday, 
Sept. 12, and Saturday, Sept. 13, accor- 
ding to Ms. Davie Nestarick, Health 
Sciences Division director. 

"It is fortunate the club has chosen 
the College for its location this year. It 
is a wonderful opportunity for our 
students to participate," Ms. Nestarick 
commented. 

The Garden Club will set up ex- 
hibits in Le Jeune Chef as well as in the 
outer hallway. 

According to Ms. Nestarick, 
students enrolled in the floriculture and 
horticulture curriculums will have an 
opportunity to display as well as enter 
into the competition. 

She said awards would be 
presented. 

In addition, students enrolled in 
the food and hospitality management 
program will prepare a luncheon for the 
judges. 



Counseling and assessment services 
and support services from community 
agencies such as legal aid and housing 
will be made available as well as peer 
support. 

"Child care monies will be 
available for individuals who decide to 
enter college," Ms. Beightol added. 

She emphasized that this grant is 
open to males as well as females, if they 
fit the criteria. 

"A simihar grant will be available 
at North Campus," she said. 

"This is a free service; there is no 
cost to the cUent," she stated. 

An outreach office will be located 
in Lock Haven for cUents who Uve in the 
CUnton County area. 

Ms. Beightol may be contacted 
through the Advisement Center, Learn- 
ing Resources Center, or by calling ex- 
tension 4765. 

Hindlctpped lo bcBcflt 

Another grant being made available by 
the Advisement Center will benefit han- 
dicapped individuals, according to Ms. 
Joie B. Williams, coordinator of the 
grant. 

"This particular grant will provide 
diagnostic services to adult handicapped 
who Uve within the state of Penn- 
sylvania," Ms. WiUiams said. 

The program wiU provide voca- 
tional assessment, communications 
skills, self-esteem, assertiveness, and 
hands-on experience. 

"The purpose is to bring voca- 
tional planning, and to teach 
marketable skills which wiU make them 
employable at no cost to the par- 
ticipants," Ms. WiUiams said, adding 
that this grant is the only one of its kind 
within the vocational/educational 
system in this state. 

The grant, which totals $68,117, 
wiU benefit 99 handicapped individuals. 
The program will be held in nine 



Bookstore hours, 
policies summarized 

The CoUege Bookstore wiU be open 
evening hours as weU as the usual 
daytime hours until this Friday, Sept. 5, 
according to Mrs. Eleonore R. 
Holcomb, Bookstore supervisor. 
The hours are: 

Monday-Thnndiy 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 
Friday 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. o^^. 
Mrs. Holcomb reviewed poUcies: 
Checks are to be made payable to 
"W.A.C.C. Bookstore" for the amount 
of purchase and ID must be provided. 
A receipt is required for aU 
refunds. There will be a ftiU refund for 
books in new condition and half for 
marked books. 

Refunds wiU be given on Fridays 
only from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

The final day for refiinds wUl be 
Friday, Sept. 12. 



two-week sessions, each being Umited to 
II individuals. The first session is 
scheduled to begin next Monday, Sept. 
8. 

Ms. WiUiams emphasized that in- 
dividuals with physical or mental han- 
dicaps wUl qualify for the program, and 
said that includes persons with drug or 
alcohol addiction. 

"We wiU concentrate on what can 
be done, not what can't be done," she 
said. She said the program is open to 
handicapped persons who feel they can 
cope with coming to school. 

She added that most of the par- 
ticipants are referrals from social agen- 
cies or the Office of Vocational 
RehabiUtation. 

The grant is being made possible 
by Section 504 of the RehabUitation Act 
of 1973. 

Interested individuals may contact 
Ms. WUliams through the Advisement 
Center, LRC, or caU CoUege Ext. 4765. 
Non-tradlttoDil occapitloiu explored 

The Advisement Center is also 
making possible a grant which wiU 
benefit persons interested in pursuing 
careers in non-traditional occupations, 
according to Ms. Sharon K. Hitesman, 
coordinator for the grant. 

' The grant, in the amount of 
$59,633, will benefit high school youths 
in the 10-county CoUege service area, 
community adults and cUents recom- 



I.D. card 
validation 
continues 

Students who have not yet obtained 
a CoUege identification card may do so 
during the first 10 days of the semester, 
according to Ms. Jo Ann R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of CoUege activities. 

I.D. cards are processed in the 
Recreation Center, LEC, 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. After the initial 10 days of the 
semester, I.D. photographs wiU be 
taken for a SIO fee, Mondays, 10 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m., or by ap- 
pointment. 

Ms. Fremiotti said that I.D. cards 
must be vaUdated for the cunent 
semester. Validation stickers are 
available at no charge in the Rec Center. 

She emphasized that I.D. cards are 
void without the current vaUdation. 

The SPOTLIGHT 
seeks new members 

Students wishing to obtain prac- 
tical experience in the field of mass com- 
munications should contact the adviser 
of the SPOTLIGHT, Anthony N. CUlo, 
associate professor of journalism. 

The SPOTLIGHT offers ex- 
perience in print journalism, 
photography, layout and design and 
advertising. 

The SPOTLIGHT is located m the 
Academic Center basement, room 7. 



mended by local social service agencies, 
students currently enroUed in non- 
traditional programs at the CoUege, and 
non-traditional workers in local 
business and industry, Ms. Hitesman 
said. 

The program vriU provide support 
services, vocational assessment, specific 
identification of non-traditional occupa- 
tions, and hands-OD experience in those 
areas. 

Ms. Hitesman said that non- 
traditional occupations are described as 
women working in career fields such as 
welding and construction and men 
working in fields such as human services 
and nursing. 

Concerning the program's 
avaUabiUty to area high school youths, 
Ms. Hitesman said that the largest task 
wUl be to combat sex roles stereotyping 
and make clear the educational 
possibiUties of benefits from working in 
non-traditional fields. 

Support services, as well as stress 
management training, wiU be provided 
to help individuals deal with stereotyp- 
ing as weU as an explanation of sex-fair 
policies. 

"We wiU provide job skiUs to train 
them for future employment," she said. 

The program wUl have outreach of- 
fices at the North Campus and other 
sites which have not yet been determin- 
ed. 

The grant is made possible by Af- 
firmative Action and Sex Equity Title 9. 

Ms. Hitesman may be reached in 
Room 333, Academic Center, or by 
telephoning College Ext. 7249. 



Deadline 

for submissions 

Is noon Wednesday 



Nurse's hours 

The Student Health Service) 
Office, In Room 104, Gym- 
Dulnffl, la open from 8 to 3:30 
p.m. dally Monday throngh Fri- 
day. 

Mn. Janet R. Qnerimit, i 
regiiteKd nnne, b availible to 
care for minor UlnesMS and In- 
Jariet u well as referrals. 



SPOTLIQHT 
Tuuday, S*pl2, 19ae • Vol. 22, No. 2 

The SPOTUQHT Is published each Monday 
momino of the academic year, except (or Col- 
lege vacatjona, by Journalism and other In- 
terested atudenta o( The Wllllamsport Area Com- 
munity College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center 1005 
W, Third St,, Wllllamapon, Pa 17701 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 7221. 

Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or of those whoso names accom- 
pany Items, Opinions do not reflect official opi- 
nion of the Institution 



member of the 



STAFF 
Kalhy L. Cobb, Oonna L. Trimble, Brenda 
M. VIbert, Liu R. Lumblrd. 

Faculty idvlur Anthony N. Clllo. 



SPOTLICHTDT.eidiT, 8(f<. 2, IfUoi 




Hut; C. Specht, uiodile profenor of 
phriicil edindon, qxtdi iwi; oi Ike gtw 
BODYGUARD ERGOPED 95S bike 



Ml. JoAu Frentottl, coordiiilor ol Coflcft Kdrlda, ikowi ker rowing ityle u ike 
dcnoutnlet the coned wij lo eierdM on Ike AVITA MM Rower. 



Intramural athletics to begin, 
sports clinics are scheduled 

Intramural athletics will be started in Room 210, Gym, Monday through 
Thursday from 1:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., according to Ms. Margot R. Bayer, even- 
ing College activities assistant. 

Students, she said, will be able to play basketball, volleyball, badminton, 
table tennis, and any other sport for which equipment is available. 

All leagues will start the second week of September. 

Students must wear proper attire to enter the gym; they are not permitted to 
bring in their own equipment. 

To enter the gym, students must show validated I.D. and to use equipment, 
they must turn in the I.D. until the equipment is returned. 

Lockers and showers are available. Students must provide locks. 

Ms. Bayer said, "This year we have a brand new athletic field... so get 
ready for those outdoor sports!" 

On next Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 15 and 16, there will be a flag football 
clinic for all participants. 

Students must attend the clinic m order to be in the tournament. 

Team rosters can be obtained in the Rec Center, and must b« returned by 
Sept. 8. 

Ms. Bayer invites all students, faculty and staff to participate in a weight 
training and exercise equipment clinic. 

She said, "Over the summer we purchased two Bodyguard Ergoped 955 
bikes, two Avita 9505L rowers and one Fitness Master LT35 Cross Country 
Skier, so let's take the time to learn how to use them." 

The cUnic will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. on Sept. 16 and 23, and will be in- 
structed by Kathy Petennan, the women's fitness director at the local YWCA. 
All interested persons please sign up in the Rec Center, room A137, LEC. 

Starting on Sunday, Sept. 7, the gym will be open 5 to 9 p.m. for Open 
Gym. Any organizations, faculty or staff who would like to have a special activi- 
ty, should contact Ms. Bayer as soon as possible. 

There will be a karate demonstration on next Thursday, Sept. 1 1 at 7 p.m. 
in the Gym. Karate classes will be held every Monday and Thursday, beginnmg 
Sept. 15, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Gym. For further information and sign up, see 
Ms. Bayer in her office. Gym 209, or at extension 7416. Classes are open tn o" 
students, faculty or staff. 

Rosters for all mtramural athletics are available in the Rec Center, LEC. 
Please return all rosters to the same office. 

...Of cars, and parking, and security... 

As the new semester gets underway, Cecil C.Cryder, supervisor of security, 
has Usted various items of concern: 
PARKING, PARKING FINES 

Cars which are parked on campus need a sticker to designate their registra- 
tion, the officer said. Tickets will be issued for cars parked in areas other than 
those for which a permit-sticker was issued. 

"The cost of those tickets can mount," the officer said. 

Furthermore, he noted, officers will be watchfiil for those who take more 
space than necessary on the lots: "The lines are down now and we would ap- 
preciate motorists' parking their vehicles between the fines - and not over the 
fines, takmg up two spaces," he said. 
BE AWARE, WATCH POSSESSIONS 

The security supervisor said he wanted to remind students and others about 
personal security: Leaving valuable possessions, books, or other personal pro- 
perty unattended is "an open invitation" to thieves. Make sure locker doors are 
locked, he cautioned. 



Rec Room hours, rules reviewed 



The CoUege Recreation Center, 
located in the Lifelong Education 
Center, will be open this week 7 a.m. to 
10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 
and 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Friday, ac- 
cording to Ms. Sandra Rhone, College 

Le Jeune Chef 
plans to offer 
Classical Cuisine 

Le Jeune Chef, Uie College's 
student-operated restaurant, wiU offer 
Classical Cuisine diimers on Thursdays, 
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., according to 
Mrs. Ann R. MigUo, assistant professor 
of food service and hospitality. 

This "jaunt throu^ Europe" will 
begin next Thursday, Sept. 1 1, and wiU 
feature regional menues ftom the British 
Isles, tiie Normandy district of France, 
and the Rhine country of Germany, 
among other places. 

Mrs. Miglio said Uiat complete din- 
ners, featuring gourmet choices in ap- 
petizer, soup, entree a d dessert courses 
will be ofered at a cost of $10 per per- 
son. 

Seating, she said, is limited. In- 
terested persons may call CoUege Ext. 
7536 for reservations. 



1AKECARE 

OFVOUR 

LUNGS. 



THEYHE 

ONLY 

HUMAN. 



AMERICAN 

LUNG 

ASSOCIATION 



activities assistant. 

Rec Center rules and r^ulations, 
as fisted in the 1986-87 Student Hand- 
book, mclude: validated CoUege I.O. 
card required to use Rec Center equip- 
ment; do not abuse equipment or the 
facility; no spitting; smoking materials 
are to be extinguished and disposed of 
in proper receptacles; trash must be 
disposed of properly; individuals and 
groups may not monopolize equipment; 
malfunctioning equipment must be 
reported immediately to Rec Room 
staff. 

Ms. Rhone stifessed that abusive 
behavior wiU not be tolerated and 
discipUnary action wiU be taken when 
necessary. 



Bank 



Conlimtdfrom Page /■■■ 

Brenda Bozochovic, WiUiamsport; John 
A Carr Jr., DanviUe; WiUiam R. Green 
Jr., Danville; Sandee Guerriero, 
Castenea; Lucille M. Keener, Turbot- 
viUe. Bonnie L. MiUer, Jersey Shore; 
Ula J. Mixer, State CoUege; Pearl J. 
Probst, Renovo; Matthew L. SmiUi, 
Lewisburg. 

Robert B, Smith, Lewisburg; Susan 
L. Tomko, Columbia Crossroads; Jerra 
L. Walden, Northumberland; Jeffery L. 
Weaver, Watsontown; LesUe C. Yeagle, 
Cogan Station. 

LirgMt dngle contribation 

Shade said tiie {10,000 conmiit- 
ment makes it the largest single con- 
tiibution to the CoUege's tuition reim- 
bursement plan among private sector 
participants. 

He added, "Tuition reimbursement 
was developed as a way of reducing tui- 
tion costs for area residents. Under tiie 
program, municipaUties, business and 
mdustry, and other interested agencies 
may offer reimbursement to students. 
Each participating orginization works 
witii the CoUege to develop an in- 
dividual plan for the level of reimburse- 
ment, and stipulates the minimum re- 
quirements for eUgibUity. 

The Financial Aid Office makes aU 
determinations on the selection of pro- 
spective recipients. 



4DSP0TLIGHTaTHtdi;, Stpl. 2, IMi 



Happenings 
Announcements 



For the vttk a}... 

nesday, Sept. 2 

llimigh Sunday, Sept. 7 



JOB OPS 



CASHIER for Bemon A-pliu 
store, Maynard & Third. Applicants 
must have pleasing personality, ability 
to deal with public, and be honest. 
Shifts are 6 p.m. to midnight, midnight 
to 6:30 a.m. Another shift is MWF on- 
ly, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. $3.35 to start, 
review after 30 days. Immediate starts. 
Interested appUcants should apply in 
person at the store. 

TRUCK DRIVERS needed by 
Canteen Vending Company for a Lock 
Haven delivery every day 7 to 9:15 a.m. 
(Could use person longer in the day if 
schedule permits.) Afternoons, a person 
is needed for inside clean-up work; 
would need to drive a vehicle occa- 
sionally. Call Joe Keirstead at 322-4608 
for an interview or more information. 

MTT STUDENT - Benton Foun- 
dry, Route 2, Box 110, Benton, Pa. 
17814, has a part-time opening in their 
Pattern Shop for a fourth semester 
MTT student. This is an opportunity 
for ftill-time employment after gradua- 
tion and could be used for co-op. 

NRM STUDENT - A Natural 
Resources Management student is need- 
ed to work in that vicinity two to eight 
hours a week mowing the lawn and 
maintaining a greenhouse. S3.00 an 
hour. Call John Fisher at 547-6774. 

BARTENDERS - One full-time 
and two full-time bartenders needed at 
the Lewisburg Hotel, 136 Market St., 
Lewisburg, Pa. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. daily. Apply in person. 

TEACHER AIDE - 20 hours a 
week, mainly weekends, S4.50 an hour. 
Wants someone who will stay for more 
than a year and someone who has ex- 
perience with children. Would be work- 
ing with children of inmates. Send 
resume to Project Impact, c/o Scott 
WiUiams, 506 S. Main St., Muncy, Pa. 
17756 or call Deanna Clark at (717) 
546-3171, Ext. 210 (and leave message 
for her to return the call). 

Insurance forms available 

Insurance forms now are available 
in the Student Health Services 
Otfice,Room 104, on the first floor of 
the Gymnasium for students interested 
in purchasing the insurance. 

EnroUment is open until Oct. 1, 
1986. 

Hours of the office are 8 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Insurance is the individual 
students' responsibility at the College. 



MEETINGS 

WWAS, student-operated campus radio, organiza- 
tional meeting, 4 p.m., Thursday, Room B104, Lifelong 
Education Center. Interested students and others 
welcome. 

GAMMA EPSILON TAU, GRAPHIC ARTS 
FRATERNITY, noon, today, Tuesday, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. Anyone interested may at- 
tend. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 8 p.m., Thursday, second 
floor, Lifelong Education Center. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION ex- 
ecutive committee meeting, 4 p.m., today, Tuesday, 
Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

SENATE/STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIA- 
TION, 5 p.m., today, Tuesday, Room 8107, Lifelong 
Education Center. 



BOOK SALE (PBL) 

Phi Beta Lambda Book Sale, now underway, Room 
3, lower level. Academic Center. Bring books for resale; 
buy books up for sale. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING AROUND TOWN 

CARNIVAL - St. Boniface Parish Carnival, 
Washington Boulevard and Penn Street, Thursday, Fri- 
day, and Saturday. 

FALL FESTIVAL - Montoursville Fall Festival, 
Montoursville (keep going east on Third Street and you'll 
reach Montoursville), Friday, Saturday, Sunday. 

TOY TRAIN EXHIBIT - Lycoming County 
Historical Museum, 858 W. Fourth St. ("around the cor- 
ner from the College"), continuous, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., 
Tuesday through Saturday, and 1:30 to 4 p.m., Sunday. 



Three bus trips scheduled 

Several trips are scheduled for this semester, aaording to Mrs. Jo Ann R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College activities. 

On October 4, a bus trip to the Baltimore Inner Harbor is scheduled. The 
bus will leave the LRC parking lot at 7 a.m. and will depart from Baltimore at 9 
p.m. Cost is $16 for College students, faculty, staff and alumni, and $18 for the 
general public. 

The deadUne for reservations is Wednesday, September 24. Money is not 
refundable. 

Two bus trips are scheduled to go to New York City in December. Buses 
will leave the LRC parking lot on December 6 and 13 at 6 a.m., and will depart 
from New York City at 9 p.m. Cost is $20 for College students, faculty, staff and 
alumni, and $22 for the general pubUc. 

There are limited tickets available for both of the New York trips at addi- 
tional cost for the Radio City Music Hall Christmas Show. Tickets are $25 for 
College students, faculty, staff and alumni, and $27 for the general public. 

The deadline for reservations is November 18. Money is not reftmdable. 

For reservations or information regarding any of the bus trips, call 
327-4763 or extension 7269. 



Students may get 
reduced bus rates 

Validated Community College ID 
cards may be used to obtain a reduced 
rate on Williamsport City Buses, accor- 
ding to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

Full-time students may show their 
validated ID card to bus drivers to iden- 
tify their student status at the Com- 
munity College, she said and added that 
- with the validation - no special bus 
pass is required. 

Only full-time students are eUgible, 
she emphasized. 

The reduced rate, she said, is of- 
fered by the Williamsport Bureau of 
Transportation. 



Library hours 
set for semester 

The Learning Resources Center will 
be open the following hours this 
semester: Monday through Thursday, 8 
a.m. to 9 p.m. and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m., according to Mrs. Kate D. 
Hickey, director of the LRC. 

Mrs. Hickey said that beginning 
next Sunday, Sept. 7, Sunday hours will 
be 2 to 9 p.m. 

She emphasized that students need 
a validated I.D. card to borrow 
materials. 



BARRY'S BROOKLYN STYLE EATERY 

Across from College's East Parking Lot 
234 Park Street Phone 323-3663 



CILLO'S COLLEGE CORNER 

Just across the strsst for a troat 
1 1 00 W. Third St. Phona 322-1 321 



BENSON A-PLUS MINI-MARKET 

Just down the street... 
857 W. 3rd St. Phone 32M811 




WiUliuupoit Area 
Community College 
WiUiamipoit, Pa. 17701 



SPOTLIGHT 



Monday, Sept. I, 19U . 
Vol. 22, No..? - 
4 Pages 



Student nominations to be accepted 



iiiaMiimi«aHBW 




College Goyernance 
System committees 
need members 




Schednled for opening In the Fill of 1987, the contnclor for the Adruc- 
ed Technologr ud Health Sciences building lald he belieTM the bnllding wffl 
be completed before thit time. HowcTer, Dr. Jimei P. Rice, uiocitte dein of 
edncitionil idvincement stiled, thit the prognmi and faculty would not be 
moved ontll next fall. 



Student Nominations 

for 
Governance System 

Use this form to make yaw nomination. 
Deadline is next Moml(o>, Sept. IS. 



Eteven itndaiti ve nctded to mve on 8vc decUioo-mtkiiK Mmmittea: The Col- 
hgeCoundl, Cuiriculum Committee, Student Afiain Committee, Academic StudanU 
and Uiuei Committee, Long Range Planning Committee. 

StDdenti ihould be vocal and ihauld demooitnte Icadenhip ability, dadicatlon, and 
liave a good academic itandlng. 



Name of Student: 



Curriculum of Student: 



fUaioni for Nomination: 



Name of Pcnon Maldng Nomination: 
|Ched[ Appropiiatcl Student ^Staff 



Faculty 



PLEASE DlOP OFF AT ACC 317 01 AT LEC tit 

ISPOTLIOHT CAMPUS SEIVICEI 



WWAS staff 
'plugged in' 

This year's staff for WWAS-FM, 
the College student-operated radio sta- 
tion, has been listed, according to 
Harry J. Rogers, public rela- 
tions/promotions director. 

The staff includes: 

Theresa Ronen, of Montoursviile, 
general manager. 

John L. Seamon, of Hazleton, 
assistant general manager. 

Rogers, of Williamsport, 
PR/promotions. - - — 

Dennis E. Wilston, of Canton, 
operations director. 

Sean T. O'Mealy, of Williamsport, 
music director. 

Chris D. Miller, of Altoona, sports 
director. 

Jerry E. Neece, of Wiiiiamsport, 
news director. 

Dale E. Lingenfelter, of East 
Freedom, news director (mornings). 

Eric Watts, of Hummels Wharf, 
production director. 

Stephen A. Mendez, of 
Williamsport, public service an- 
nouncements director. 

Scott D. Stenger, of 
Chambersburg, program director. 



Trustees meet, 
okay yarious items 

A Dtadtbu Riport 
By Kathy LCebb 

The CoUege Board of Tnutees met lait 
Thursday evening to discuss regular CoUege 
business including a bid to purchase healing oil, 
gasoline and diesel fuel for the current year, 
various personnel items, acceptance of the Inter- 
nal Governance System policy, and a revision to 
a section of the trustees' by-laws. 

All items were unanimously approved ex- 
cept Uie revision of the by-laws. That was tabled 
in favor of establishing a committee to review 
Uie by-laws. 

In his report. Dr. Robert L. Breuder, Col- 
lege president, announced Uiat while student 
enrollment for this semester is down 9 percent, 
the urrent figures indicate Uut .7 percent more 
students are attending ttie College, over a 9.7 
percent projected deficit. 



There are 1 1 openings for students 
in committees designated by the recently 
approved by-laws for the College 
Governance System, according to Mrs. 
Veronica M. Muzic, recently-elected 
chairperson of the College Council and 
professor of English. 

Eleven students will be selected 
from across the campus to serve on five 
committees, she said, calling it a "great 
potential learning experience which will 
look good on a resume, and which will 
be a great indicator of leadership 
qualities and a sense of community." 
Two from SGA 

Dr. Jeannette Fraser, dean of 
educational research, planning and 
evaluation, member oi tne Lrovemance 
Steering Committee, said that two of the 
11 students will be selected from the 
Student Government Association, and 
the other nine from the different areas 
of the campus. 

"SGA will be permitted to use its 
own selection process," she 
stated, "but, the other students will be 
nominated by faculty of staff, or even 
self-nominated." 

She added, "Each committee will 
have at least two students so they have 
a peer to relate to... to discuss items 
with." 

Will look at curricula 

According to Dr. Fraser, the five 
committees on which students will serve 
are the College Council, the Curriculum 
Committee, Academic Standards and 
Issues Committee, the Students Affairs 
Committee, and the Long Range Plann- 
ing Committee. 

■■■ Pltase Turn to Page 4 

Deadline Oct. I 
for insurance 

Student insurance enrollment is 
open until Wednesday, Oct. 1, for any 
student wishing to purchase insurance, 
according to Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, 
College nurse. 

"Please note that the College does 
not provide insurance for any student," 
she said. 

She added "If you have no 
coverage, this is the most inexpensive 
way to provide coverage for yourself." 

Applications are available inRoom 
104 in the Gym. 



laSPOTLIGHTDMonday, Sept. 8, 1986 

Tollow the rules'; keep Rec 
Center 'pleasant for all' 
says activities assistant 

"Students must follow the Rec Center rules. It you don't know what they 
are... aski You must bo responsible enough to seek out the rules H they are 
not posted," said Ms. Sandra Rhone, College activities assistant. 

She emphasized, "This Is everybody's Rec Center. If everybody follows 
the rules, this can be a pleasant place (or all." 

They're In the handbook 

A listing of the Rec Center rules can be found In the 1988-1987 Student 
Handbook or by asking the Rec Center staff, she said. 

Iwls.Rhone stated that Individuals can obtain pool cues from the Rec 
Center oftlce "simply by showing a valid driver's license. College ID card, or 
signing for It." 

Hour* lor thia week 

She emphasized that It Is "torbldden to bring Susquehanna Room 
glasses, trays, or utensils Into the Rec Room." 

The Rec Center will be open this week from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday, and from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Friday. 

Comment invited by Advisement Center 
about Institutional Self Evaluation 

Students are invited to read and comiDent on the "Institutional Self Evalua- 
tion"required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1972, according to 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of Advisement and Career Services. 

"This piece of legislation," he explained, 
"spells out the rights of qualified handicapped submiM 

students to receive a higher education and prevents 
discrimination practices against handicapped 
students." 

Students may read the "Self Evaluation" in the Advisement and Career 
Services Center in Room 157, Learning Resources Center. 

The director commented, "Your input to this important document is re- 
quested and any comments or suggestions can be made to me." 

Emery is coordinator of Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1975; his office 
is in Room 157, LRC. 



B^ Personnel 

Of Advisement 

and Carter Services 



SGA to select senators; 
students needed for committees 



The Student Government Associa- 
tion will select new senators during 
tomonow's meeting, according to Ms. 
Sandra Rhone, College activities assis- 
tant, and SGA advisor. 

She said the selections will be based 
on information obtained during inter- 
views held last week by returning SGA 
officers, and members of the SGA Ad- 
visory Council. 

Those students who are selected 
will be contacted individually, she add- 
ed. 

Ms. Rhone emphasized that the 
SGA is also looking for students in- 
terested in working on the committees. 

"The SGA is looking to estabUsh 
guidelines for the committees and the 
Advisory Council. We need the input 



WAR!! WAR!! 


Coming.... 


The Great Battle... 


Between... PEANUTS 


and 


GARFIELD !! ! 


Which side will YOU be on!?l?!?l? 



and participation of as many students as 
possible," she said. 

"For instance, a committee will be 
estabUshed to identify problems within 
the College, and to come up with solu- 
tions to those problems. Problems can- 
not be solved without student participa- 
tion," she added. 

"We encourage everyone to voice 
their complaints and suggestions," she 
said, adding that the use of the 
grievance form would expedite matters. 

She also emphasiz«l that Senate 
meetings are open to everyone, in- 
cluding faculty and staff. 

The grievance form, provided 
below, should be filled out when 
necessary and returned to the Rec 
Center office. 
— — — """"Tl 



SGA 

STUDENT ACTION 

Concern/Suggestion Form 



Write Your Concern in This Space: 



Write Your Suggestion to the Problem: 



Date Sut)mmed: 

[Check Appropriate Items] Student: Yes Wo- 

Full-tlme Part-time Other 

Curriculum: 

NAME: 

LOCAL ADDRESS: 



TELEPHONE: 
8IQNATURE [REQUIRED]: 



{SPOTLIGHT CAMPUS SeRVICEl 



SPOTLIOHT 
Mofldty, S*pL t, law - Vol. 22, No. 2 

The SPOTUQHT is publlghad each Monday 
momlng of the academic year, except (or Col- 
lege vacatlona, by journalism and other In- 
terested students of The Wllllamsport Ares Com- 
munity College. 

Office: Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 
W, Tlilrd St.. Vfllllamsport. Ps, 17701, 
Telephone; (717) 326-3781 , Extension 221 , 



Opinions expressed sre those of the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany Items Opinions do not rstlecl offlclsl opi- 
nion of the Institution. 




STAFF THIS WSUE 

Kathy L Cobb, Caltwrine A. Hannon, 
Ruth Ann Hlison, Lisa R. Lumbard, Donna L. 
THmble, Mart A. Varano, and Brsnda M. 
Vlbsrt, Mary E. Walter. 

Anthony N. Clllo, oontrlbuling Iseutty ad- 
vlsar. 



Student Housing 
single rooms 

924 W. Third St. 

Just a block from campus 

CALL... 326-6536 






Two 'readers' just installed 
in Library and Tutoring Center 



Two revolutionary new readers us- 
ed in aiding the visually handicapped 
have been installed in the College 
Library and the Tutoring Center, fint 
floor Learning Resources Center, accor- 
ding to Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, director 
of learning resources at the College. 

The VTEK Voyager XL magnifies 
print, photographs, and assists the 
visually handicapped in reading ahnost 
anything, 

Mrs. Hickey said, "It is a two- 
piece viewing aid, and consists of a 
camera section which views the reading 
material, and a monitor which displays 
the enlarged print. The monitor will 
display black on white or white on 
black, and the print can be enlarged up 
to two inches. 

The VTEK XL was purchased with 
Federal Vocational Education Funds 
distributed by the state under a grant 
which is entitled Vocational Diagnostic 

Student Health Services Office 
open Monday through Friday 

The Student Health Services Office, 
in Room 104, Gymnasium, is open from 
8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily, Monday 
through Friday. 

Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, a 
registered nurse, is available to care for 
minor iUnesses and injuries as well as 
referrals. 



Services for the Handicapped In- 
dividuals. 

The readers are available for use by 
the students during normal library 
hours. Students can check at the circula- 
tion desk at the College Library for in- 
formation on how to use the readers. 



Tutoring Center 
hours posted 

The Tutoring Center, in the 
Learning Resources Center, will 
be open Mondays through 
Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
and on Fridays from 8 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

The Tutoring Center will be 
closed on weekends, according to 
Mrs. Diana L Kuhns, coor- 
dinator. 

Mrs. Kuhns said the Tutor- 
ing Center will be limited mostly 
to math and English tutoring this 
year. 

Next week, schedules of the 
tutors will be available so that 
students can plan times for tutor- 
ing. 



JOIN NOW 

Phi Beta Lambda 

National Business Organization 



Membership Applications 

Now Are Available for 

Students in 

BUSINESS. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE, 

AND BUSINESS ELECTIVE 

courses. 



APPLY NOW IN 

ROOM 3 

ACADEMIC CENTER 

LOWER LEVEL 




(Recruiting now 
through this Friday) 



Future Business Leaders of America PBL, Inc. 



The Community College's 
Outstanding College Organization 



Play ball! 
Intramurals start 
tomorrow 

All basketball, volleyball, and bad- 
minton leagues will begin tomorrow at 4 
p.m., aaording to Ms. Margot R. 
Bayer, evening College activities assis- 
tant. 

Schedules will be posted on the 
bulletin board on the first floor of the 
gym and also on other College activities 
bulletin boards. 

All roaten arc doe today, she said. 

League schedules are as follows: 

Tomorrow, Taeaday, Sept. 9 

4 to 10 p.m. 

Basketball and volleyball leagues 
start. 

This Wednesday, Sept. 10 

4 to 10 p.m. 

Basketball and volleyball leagues 
play. 

This Thonday, Sept. 11 

4 to 10 p.m. 

Basketball and volleyball leagues 
play. 

On Thonday, too, there will be a 
karate demomtradon at 7 p.m. In the 
gym. 

Ms. Bayer said she is "urging all 
faculty and stafT' interested in playing 
volleyball to get teams together so a 
league can be formed. 

"It has been suggested that Thun- 
day evenings right after work would be a 
good time," she said, adding that she 
would Uke comment about that. 

Those interested may call Ext. 7416 
or contact her in the gym. 

Flag footbaO cUnki will begin next 
week. 

The cUnics will be held next Mon- 
day, Sept. IS and Tuesday, Sept. 16. 
All participants must sign up in the Rec 
Center, Ms. Bayer said. 

A weight training clinic is set, she 
noted. 

The weight training chnic for 
women and men to learn to use new 
equipment and to start people on their 
personal weight training programs will 
be held next week and the following 
week. 

The clinic will be held from 4 to 6 
p.m., on Tuesday,Sept. 16 and on 
Tuesday, Sept. 23. It will instructed by 
Kathy Peterman, women's fitness direc- 
tor at the YWCA. 

Those interested in the weight 
training cUnic may sign up in the Rec 
Center. 

Open gym hoon for today are 4 to 
10 p.m. 

Ms. Bayer can be reached In 
Room 209, Gym, or by telephoning 
CoOege Eit. 7416. 



Starting 

Next Week... 

Crossword Puzzle 



SPOTUGHTDMonday, Sept. 8. 19Md3 

NOW to hold 
Health Day 
in Lewisburg 

The women of SUN counties 
NOW, (National Organization of 
Women) will sponsor their Second An- 
nual Women's Health Day on Satur- 
day, Sept. 20, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in 
the Lewisburg Community Center, 116 
N. Second St., Lewisburg, according to 
Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, College nurse. 

"The workshops are designed to 
provide the information you need to 
make critical choices about your per- 
sonal health," she said. 

According to Mrs. Querimit, pro- 
fessionals from a number of medical 
and social service fields will offer their 
expertise in small group settings. 

Some of the workshops to be of- 
fered will include: 

1. "Osteoporosis and You" by 
Cathy Ferraro, R.D., Nutritiional Con- 
sultant 

2. "Re-Visioning Superwoman: 
Strategies for Understanding and 
Managing the Stresses of the Job and 
Family, "by Virginia Smith, Ph.D., 
English instructor. 

3. "Aerobics and Exercise," by 
Rickie Daniels, licensed physical 
therapist 

Lunch may be purchased or you 
may bring your own. The cost for lunch 
will be $4. 

Child care will be provided for 
children two yean and older at a cost of 
$2.30 per child. Participants are asked 
to bring lunches for children. 

Registration is SS per person. 
Anyone interested in attending should 
contact Mrs. Querimit in Room 104 of 
the Gym. 

Reservations 
still being taken 
for bus trips 

Reservations still are being taken 
for the bus trips arranged through the 
College Activities Office, according to 
Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
Collie activities. 

Deadline for reservations for the 
Baltimore Inner Harbor trip - on Oct. 
4 - is Wednesday, Sept. 24. Money is 
not refundable. 

Two trips are planned to New York 
City: Dec. 6 and Dec. 13. 

Tickets for the Baltimore trip are 
SI6 for students of the Community Col- 
lege, faculty, staff and alumni, and $18 
for the public. 

Tickets for the New York trips are 
$20 for students, faculty, staff, and 
alumni of the Community College, and 
$22 for the public. 

Ms. Fremiotti said each student, 
faculty member, staff member or alum- 
nus is permitted to purchase only one 
ticket per I.D. All others must pay the 
price of public tickets, even if they are 
accompanying someone from the Col- 
lege, she said. 



4aSPOTUOHTOMonday, Sept. 8, 1986 

Student nominations to be accepted for 
five committees 



Happenings 
Announcements 



Contlmudfiom Page IWmm 

Students who serve on the Cur- 
riculum Committee will have an oppor- 
tunity to aid the College in adding new 
programs or deleting already existing 
programs. 

The Academic Standards and 
Issues Committee will permit students 
who participate to deal with Associate 
Degree core competencies, student 
retention and/or probation, student ter- 
mination, instructional methodology 
and materials, and program evaluation. 

Students who work on the Students 
Affairs Committee will deal with issues 
such as student housing, athletics, ex- 
tracurricular activities, student govern- 
ment, cultural events, general student 
welfare and examination of student ac- 
tivity funds. 

Whit ire pitoritlei? 

Working on the Long Range Plan- 
ning Committee, which Or. Fraser said 
is the longest-impact committee, will 
allow students to have input into 
deciding the future of the College. 

"This committee will determine 
what the College's priorities are," she 
said, adding that while every five years a 
major update to the plan is done, 
smaller updates are completed each 
year. 

The College Council serves 
somewhat as an advisory board to the 
committees and to the College presi- 
dent. According to Mrs. Muzic, all that 
is received from the committees will flow 
to the Council for comment. 

She stated, "The Council is that 
part of the structure through which 
everything filters." In addition, she 
said, the Council will make sure the 
governance system runs smoothly. 

"Those who serve within the Coun- 
cil and on the committees must be 
responsive. ..must participate in mon- 
thly meetings, and should have some in- 
put into the issues at hand," Mrs. 
Muzic emphasized. 

She continued,"The governance 
by-laws have a built-in mechanism 
which seeks resignations from those who 
do not perform their responsibilities on 
a regular basis." 

Mrs. Muzic emphasized that the 
success of the governance process will 
depend largely on the dedication and 
participation of committee and council 



members. 

She said, "The process will simply 
limp along if the participants are not 
strong." 

According to Mn. Muzic, students 
who are nominated will be interviewed 
and then selected on the basis of certain 
criteria such as leadership abilities, the 
ability to voice their opinions, and 
academic standing. 

She stated,"Working on the coun- 
cil or on one of the committees will re- 
quire a time commitment, and most im- 
portantly, an energy commitment. If the 
students are strong, the potential is 
there for their voices to be heard... and 
for impact." 

She said that in the past, students 
were never given an opportunity to serve 
on curriculum committees or commit- 
tees which dealt with academic stan- 
dards or issues. 

"The fact that we will have two 
students on the College Council is also 
extraordinary,"she stated. 

She added that governance 
meetings will be open to the campus in 
general, and the actions of both the . 
Council and the committees will be 
made public through existing organs 
such as the New Week News and the 
SPOTLIGHT, and possibly through a 
governance newsletter. 

Mrs. Muzic said, "This should be 
an interesting year. The Governance 
process can be a really strong part of 
this institution." 

Mrs. Muzic also stated that she 
doesn't anticipate the system getting off 
of the ground much before early Oc- 
tober. 

She urges anyone having 
knowledge of a student or students who 
might fit the criteria to use the nomina- 
tions form as soon as possible. The 
deadline for nominations is next Mon- 
day, Sept. 13. 

The forms may then be dropped off 
at either of two locations: Mrs. Muzic's 
office, in Room 317 of the Academic 
Center, or Dr. Eraser's office, Room 
216 of the Lifelong Education Center. 

Additional forms can be picked up 
in the Susquehanna Room, the Finan- 
cial Aid Office, and the Library. 



CiUo's 

College 

Comer 

PHONE 322-1321 

1109 W. Third St. 

(Next lo (he Academic 

Center) 

HOURS* 

Mon. thru Than. 7:30 a.m. 



BREAKFAST SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 

Ham • Cheese • Egg 
on Muffin 
$1.25 Reg. $1.65 

LUNCH SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 

Whole Regular Sub 
$2.00 Reg. $2.40 

to 6 p.m. Friday, 7:30 a.m. lo 4 p.m. 



For Ike week (^Monday, Sept. 7 Ihroiigh Sunday, Sept. 14 
MEETINGS 

Student Government Association Executive Meeting... 4 p.m. tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Sept. 9, in Room B-107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association Senate... 5 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Sept. 9, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Room B-107, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 p.m., Wednesday, Room B-107, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

Sidewalk book sale to be this Saturday downtown 

The Friends of the James V. Brown Library will hold the annual sidewalk book 
sale this Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Library in downtown 
WilUamsport. 

In the event of rain, the sale will be held in Christ Episcopal Church, 426 
Mulberry St., a block from the library. 

More than 12,000 books are on sale from IS cents to 40 cents. 

Besides books, there is a selection of magazines, records, and sheet music 

on sale. (MEU RELEAH. JAME* v. mown UWAflY] 

Flower show 



this week 

in Le Jeune Chef 

The Duboistown Garden Club will 
present a flower show in Le Jeune Chef 
in the Lifelong Education Center this 
Friday and Saturday, according to Ms. 
Davie Jane Nestarick, Health Sciences 
Division director. 

Ms. Nestarick said that students 
enrolled in the floriculture and hor- 
ticulture curriculums will have an op- 
portunity to display as well as to enter 
into the competition. 

Awards, including National Coun- 
cil awards, Pennsylvania State awards, 
and Qub awards, will be presented in 
categories such as horticulture, design, 
student exhibits, and educational ex- 
hibits. 

Ms. Nestarick added that students 
enrolled in the food and hospitality 
management program will prepare a 
lunchem for the judges. 

The Garden Qub will set up ex- 
hibits m Le Jeune Chef as well as in the 
outer hallway. 



""^ BENSON 



JOB OP 

Stine's Sunoco, Broad and Howard 
Sts., Montounville, has an opening for 
a student, 4 to 8 p.m. to pump gas. 
Must be able to change batteries and 
belts and do light mechanical work. Call 
Carl or Elizabeth Stine at 368-9055. 
(Evenings and all day Saturday.) 



BARRY'S 




ROOMS 
FOR RENT 



"Save-A-Buck Specials 
Open 'TU 11 P.M. Diily 



P^^ 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



FREEI 32 OUNCE FOUNTAIN DRINK 

With This Ad [Coupon] 
When Presented at A plus 

Offer Expires Mon., 9/30/86 
ALWAYS OPEN... ALL NIQHT, HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



SPOTLIGHT 



f «-" I Vfy'^ 



Mmrft;, Scpl- IS. IN* • Vol. U, No> • I Pifa 
WUiBipoit Ant CohbuUt Colcie • WWuvort, Pt. 1TN1 




A 

CHORUS 

LINE 

STEVE 
LANDESBERG 




Performing 
Artists 
Series 
Scheduled 
...Story, Page 8 




MAYNARD 
FERGUSON 




New Series 

Begins in the 

New Year 




2aSP0TUGHTDMiiidi;, Stfl. IS, IMt 

Class action ruling 
opens door to others; 
reimbursements possible 



Due to a recent ruling handed 
down by Lycoming County Court Judge 
Thomas C. Raup and a prior ruling 
handed down last year by the same 
judge, students who were denied College 
sponsorship by the WiUiamsport Area 
School District and the South 
WiUiamsport Area School District now 
have an opportunity to demand reim- 
bursement for tuition, according to 
Robert W. Ferrell, law clerk for Judge 
Raup. 

"The cases presented by both 
plaintiffs have now been determined 
'class actions' by the judge," he said, 
adding that the decision opens the door 
to other students, who, when going 
beyond the traditional four semesters at 
the College, were denied sponsorship 
and had to pay a higher tuition rate in 
order to attend. 

"It is important to note that the 
final decision regarding which students 
qualify for reinbursement has not been 
made, and will probably not be made 
until early 1987," Ferrell sUted. 



Student Nominations 

for 
Governance System 

Use this form to make your nommation. 
Deadline is... mUAMl 



Eleven students are needed to serve on five decision-maldag committees: The College 
Council, Curriculum Committee, Student Affairs Committee, Academic SUndards and 
Issues Committee, Long Range Planning Committee. 

Students should be vocal and should demomtrate leadenhip ability, dedication, and 
have a good academic sUnding. 



I nominate: 



Name of Student: 



Curriculum of Student: 



Reasons for NominatioD: 



Name of Person Making Nomination: 
[Checlt Approprialej Student Staff 



Faculty 



PLEASE DROP OFF AT REC CENTER IN LEC. 

ISPOTUOHT CAMPUS SERVICBI 



Use your Library says LRC 
assistant; services reviewed 



"Right now, students who think 
they qualify for reimbursement should 
contact either the College dean of stu- 
dent services or the law fins of Casale 
and Bonner, who represent both 'class 
actions,'" he added. 

"It is the burden of the plaintiffs to 
present evidence of residence, applica- 
tion for sponsorship, denial of sponsor- 
ship and additional tuition costs incur- 
red," Ferrell pointed out. 

Dr. WiUiam J. Martin, dean of stu- 
dent services, invites anyone with ques- 
tions or concerns regarding this matter 
to visit his office. Room 218, Lifelong 
Education Center, or to telephone him 
at College extension 7487. 

Parking reminder 

Parking on areas other than park- 
ing lots - such as gravel, grass, or 
ground adjacent to lots - is prohibited, 
Cecil C.Cryder, chief of security said in 
a reminder last week. 

Parking in such areas, he said, 
ofien causes a safety problem and may 
be a private property violation. 



All College students as well as area 
residents and members of the Sus- 
quehanna Library Cooperative are 
welcome to use the library's facilities, 
according to Mrs. Judy F. McConnell, 
Learning Resources Center technical 
assistant. 

"We are here to answer questions. 
If you don't know it is better to ask," 
she said. 

Mrs. McConnell is responsible for 
hiring, training, and supervising work 
study students. 

Resources available 

Books, magazines, newspapers, 
maps, pamphlets, government docu- 
ment records, audio cassettes, slides, 
and a microfilm reader printer are 
among the many learning materials 
available to students, Mrs. McConnell 
said. 

Two VTEX Voyager XL machines, 
new readers which magnify print and 
photographs and assist students who are 
visually handicapped, are available in 
the Library. 

All material in the general collec- 
tion may be borrowed, except 
periodicals and reference materials 
which do not circulate. 

A valid student ID or town bor- 
rowers card is required to check out 
books. The standard loan is three 
weeks, and if the item is returned after 



the due date, and overdue fine of 10 
cents per day for each item is assessed 
for each day the library is open. 

Services provided 

Mrs. McConnell stated other ser- 
vices are available as well. 

Included: 
Interlibrary loiiu 

"If a student can't find informa- 
tion or a book at the College library, he 
may borrow it through a service called 
interlibrary loan." 
Ktttntt 

"A student may obtain special 
material set aside by instructors. Ask 
for it at the circulation desk." 
Computer levtliea 

"For a fee, the College Library will 
do computer searching of indexes." 
Ubnry Lib 

"A self-help lab is available to 
review subjects from 4th grade math 
through calculus, English, career deci- 
sions, and accounting." 
Copier 

"Copies cost 10 cents and 20 cents 
depending on the size copied." 
Stndy rooDu 

"Two study rooms with typewriters 
are available on the second floor of the 
Library. These rooms can be used for 
individual or group study. Handicapped 
students can have access to these rooms 
by elevator." 



SGA 

STUDENT ACTION 

Concern/Suggestion Form 



Write Your Concerrt in This Space: 



Write Your Suggestion to ttie Problem: 







1 


Date Subrrtltted: 






[Check Appropriate Itenns] 
Full-time Part-time 


Student: Yes No 

— Other 


Curriculum: 




r 


NAME: 






LOCAL ADDRESS: 




1 


TELEPHONE: 




§ 


SIGNATURE [REOUIRED]: 


■ ^^^^■K^^^^B 





SPOTUGHTDMMdi;, Scpl. IS, lM<a3 



Second Front Page 



SGA selects 

senators; 

committee 

chairs 

appointed 



Fifteen itudeats were recently 
selected as Student Government 
Association senators for the 1986-87 
year. 

Ms. Sandra Rbone, SGA adviser, 
said that last Tuesday, selections were 
made based on academic achievement, 
leadership quaUties, dedication, and 
concern for student-related issues. 

Returning senators include Joshua 
Burke, a graphic arts student from 
York; Karen Campbell, a graphic arts 
student from Moscow; Jim Corle, a 
nursery management student ftom 
Williamsport, and Bill Fritz, a plumb- 
ing and heating student from Homer Q- 

ty. 

New senators for the year will be 
Susan Baumer, culinary arts, 
Hughesville; Barry Blumquist, aviation 
maintenance technician, Warren; Bill 
Calvert, electrical technology, Dun- 
cansville; Kathy Cobb, individual 
studies, Williamsport; Maria Herold, 
general studies, SeUngsgrove; Bret 
Koontz, computer science, Wysox; Dan 
Partsch, diesel technology, Sidman; 
Chris Patterson, tool design technology, 
Fayetteville; Roger Snook, forest 
technology, Beaver Springs; Lynee 
Wasjon, business management, Pine 
Grove Mills; Brian Winters, culinary 
arts, Brookville. 

Ms. Rhone said that one senate 



position remains open to students in the 
Industrial Technologies Division. 

She said she is urging faculty and 
staff to nominate students in those cur- 
riculums. 

In addition, the following students 
were appointed to chair SGA commit- 
tees: Janice Appleton, secretarial office 
administration, Towanda: Debbie 
Balliet, dental assisting, HoUidaysburg 
Darcie Kelsey, advertising art, 
Williamsport; Michelle Schuler, word 
processing, Williamsport; Stephanie 
Sewesky, general studies, Williamsport; 
Chris Wey, human services, Dewart. 

Thirteen students were named to 
serve on SGA committees, Ms. Rhone 
stated. They are Sue Bailey, accounting, 
Monroeton; Dale Cole, accounting, 
Hughesville; Jeff Eskra, construction 
carpentry, WiUiamsport; Joe DeLash, 
service and operation of heavy construc- 
tion equipment, Hazelton; John Finzel, 
general studies, Williamsport; Paul 
Huffman, individual studies, Muncy; 
Sue Hurlburt, food and hospitaUty 
management, Genesee; Susan Kallan- 
srud, journalism, Williamsport; 
Marianne Nocket, nursery manage- 
ment, Cumbola; Darren Pysher, broad- 
casting, WiUiamsport; Tim Urban, 
business management, Canton; Carta 
Waldman, business management, 
WiUiamsport; and Tim Wirt, accoun- 
ting, Hemdon. 



See me before 
4:30 about awards, 
says Dr. Walker 

The National Endowment for the 
Humanities is currently taking appUca- 
tions for Younger Scholar Awards, 
worth $2,200, according to Dr. Thomas 
J. WaUier, assistant professor of history 
and government. 

The Younger Scholar Awards sup- 
port students who wish to conduct 
research and writing projects in the 
humanities during the summer of 1987, 
he said. 

Anyone interested in receiving 
more information should contact Dr. 
WaUter no later than 4:30 p.m. today. 

Dr. WaUter's otBce is in Room 
317, Academic Center, and his CoUege 
phone extension is 7354. 



Newly-selected SGA ^^a committees 
groups meet tomorrow 



need students 



Recently-selected Student Government Association senators, commit- 
tee chairpersons and committee members wUI meet for an introductory 
Student Government Association meeting tomorrow at 4 p.m. in Room 
BI07, Lifelong Education Center, according to Ms. Sandra Rbone, SGA 
adviser. 

"The primary reason for meeting is for everyone to get acquainted 
and for interested individuals to nominate themselves for SGA offices," 
Ms. Rhone said. 

Nommations are open to senators, she clarified, saying that the 
foUowing ofBces need to be fUled: president, vice president, treasurer, 
parUamentarian, student action officer, program development/evaluation 
officer, and student awareness/communications officer. 

She stated that during the meeting, the group wUI be addressed by Dr. 
Jeannette Eraser, dean of educational research, planning and evaluation. 

Dr. Eraser wUI discuss the Internal Governance System, and the role 
of the SGA within that system. 

Ms. Rhone said that officer selections wUl take place the foUowing 
week, Tuesday, Sept. 23, at 4 p.m.. Room B107, LEC. 



"SGA committees are now form- 
ing," according to Ms. Sandra Rhone, 
SGA adviser. 

"Students interested in serving the 
CoUege and the student body should 
contact one of the newly-selected 
senators or visit the SGA office, located 
in the Rec Center," she stated. 

Ms. Rhone emphasized that 
although some students have been ap- 
pointed to serve on committees - either 
as chairpersons or as committee 
members - many openings stUI exist. 

She also said that any division 
within the CoUege can recommend a 
student to serve on an SGA committee. 

She urges students who desire 
changes within the CoUege, or who have 
strong feeUngs regarding student-related 
issues to join a committee and attend 
SGA meetings. 

"Students can make a difference," 
she stated. 



SPOTLIQHT 
Mond«y, 8«pL 15. I9«g ■ Vol. 22, No. 3 

The SPOTUQHT Is published esch Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept for Collefle vacaUons, by foumalism and ottier Interested students of The 
Wllllamsporl Area Community College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center. 100B W, Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 
17701. Telephone: (717) 328-3761, Extenalon 221 



THE STAFF 

Kalhy L. Cobb, Catherine A. Hannon, Ruth Ann Hlxson, Lisa R. Lumbard, 
Donna L Trimble, Mare A. Varano. Bronda M. VIbsrt, Mary E. Walter, Brian M. 
Holllngiworth, Margaret M, DINardo, Todd A. Egger. Todd A. Patterson, 
Michael Waldron. 

Anthony N. Clllo, contributing faculty advisor. 



4aSP0TUGHTDMMdv, Sept. IS, ItM 




Altkoagb not operadoul u yet, the DM controlled GPllO will ran In con- 
Jnncdon with i Baxter lithe. When opcndonil, with the mlDing michlnet, 
thli micUne will muafictnrc injlhlng from i car door flitare to i 
candlettkk for the home. 




CoUege buys $2,000,000 



Among the addidona tcmporaiil] 
Metal Tradei Centen arc: aCNCCoi 
ter, a CNC Computer Nnmerlcal Cont 
ter Lathe GN3 Serici, and a General E 
Knhu, asiiitant director of Indnitrial 




By catting under water, the CNC Compi 
DMi the gaiei argon, nitrogen, and hy 
clean. Thii techniqoe coti down on ei 
dlitortion of materials. 



Not operational yet, the IBM-controlled robotic will ran In coqjnnction with 
the milling macUnea. 




Fovth lemeiler indnitrial technology itndenti ranning metal lathei. 



SPOTUGHTDMoidi;, Stpt. IS.ltUoS 



I in industrial equipment 



irOy hooMd in the Bnilding Trades ind 
Compnter Nomerical Control Plisma Cnt- 
ontrol Wire Lathe, a General Electric Bu- 
ll Electric GP 110, according to Donald T. 
rial technology. 




mpnter Nnmerlcal Control Pluma Cntter 
hydrogen, to cut metal aDoyi fast and 
n enTironmental pollution, and prcTcnta 



p 


— - —J ^^3H 


^H^w\ / 


J 


i 


^tKf 


!■» 


■H 




r^ 


^, 1 


^Hr^^ 


'' -4 ^ 


c 


^-^ 






ii^HI 




David R. McCracken, a welding itndent from Croiby, demonitratei arc grin- 
ding. 



Explaining the nie of the Fabipec welding machine by General Electric are 
Jamet W. Foi, welding initmctor, and Jeff T. Tndor, welding itndent from 
Sanbnry. 



Photos by Donna L.Trimble 
Production by Donna L.Trimble and Brenda M. Vibert 



6a8P(mJGHTaMMdir, scpt. is, in* 

GET invites 
students to pledge 
for membership 

Gafflma EpsiloD Tau, graphic arts 
fraternity, is iDvidng all graphic arts 
students or those entering the field to 
pledge. 

According to Margaret M. DiNar- 
do, secretary, the club, is responsible 
for a variety of College-oriented projects 
as well as community services. 

GET is a national honor society, 
and is open to all in the field of graphic 
arts. 

"For your appUcation, come to the 
GET office, located in the ACC base- 
ment," she said. 

Reservations 
still being taken 
for bus trips 

Reservations still are being taken 
for the bus trips arranged through the 
College Activities Office, according to 
Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of 
CoUege activities. 

Deadline for reservations for the 
Baltimore Inner Harbor trip - on Oct. 
4 - is Wednesday, Sept. 24. Money is 
not refundable. 

Two trips are planned to New York 
City: Dec. 6 and Dec. 13. 

Tickets for the Baltimore trip are 
J16 for students of the Community Col- 
lege, faculty, staff and alumni, and $18 
for the public. 

Tickets for the New York trips are 
$20 for students, faculty, staff, and 
alumni of the Community College, and 
$22 for the public. 

Ms. Fremiotti said each student, 
faculty member, staff member or alum- 
nus is permitted to purchase only one 
ticket per I.D. All others must pay the 
price of pubUc tickets, even if they are 
accompanying someone from the Col- 
lege, she said. 

The Antrim on (he lower (Sooth) 
tide of (he new ProtcMlonil Develop- 
ment Center. Nodce (he solar windows 
above. The building li icbednled (o 
open In the Fall 1987, according (o Dr. 
Jamei P. Rice, (he ttiociite dean of 
edncitional idvancemen(. The cen(er Is 
behig comple(ely bnilt by CommnnKy 
College Kadenb. 



State music fellowships available; 
application guidelines on campus 



Job Ops 



The Pennsylvania Council on the 
Arts will award $20,000 in fellowships 
for composers and com- 
poser/collaborative projects involving 
librettists, video artists, fihnmakers, 
poets, choreographers or other artists to 
create or to complete works. 

Funding may 
be used by com- 
posers to devote p,^ 
free tine to creative g,if„ 
work. A Umited /nm 
amount of the grant council of the Arts 
may be used to pur- 
chase materials and 

services such as extracting of score and 
parts. 

The fellowships are not commis- 
sions and are awarded primarily on the 
basis of the quality of the applicant's 
previous work and the merit of the pro- 




AU appUcants must be residents of 
Pennsylvania. 

The final 
deadline for ap- 
plications is Oct. 1, Dndttiu 
1986. An- l> 
nouncements of Oct I 
awards will be made 
in December. 

For Application forms or addi- 
tional information, persons should con- 
tact the Pennsylvania Council on the 
Arts, Room 216, Finance Building, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 17120, or Christine 
Voigt, Music Program Director at Area 
Code 717, 787-1523. 

A "guidelines booklef'about the 
fellowships is available on campus, in 
Room 108, Gym. 

A workshop will be held Friday at 
2 p.m. at the Matress Factory, 500 
Sampsonia Way, Pittsburgh, for those 
who wish to attend to ask about ap- 
plication procedures or the fellowship 
program itself. 







Iitfomation is provided by Ike Ad- 
visement and Career Services Cenler. 

DELIVERY PERSONS -Pudgie's 
Pizza on Washington Blvd. needs peo- 
ple to deliver. Must own car which gets 
20-22 miles per gal. Would be scheduled 
regular hours part-time. Apply in per- 
son. Talk with Chuck or Dave. Must 
possess a positive attitude and be friend- 
ly- 

NURSE'S AmES - needed part- 
time. Would schedule around 
student's classes various houn. Call 
Bonnie Adams at 323-1878. 

STUDENT NEEDED - A student 
needed to work in the vicinity of the 
Natural Resources Management 
building, mowing the lawn and main- 
taining a greenhouse. $3 an hour. Call 
John Fisher at 547-6774. 

BABYSITTER - Babysitter need- 
ed as many hours per week as a person 
can sit during the day (working around 
schedule). Call Christine Pfleegor at 
368-8993. 

WAIXRESS - Barry's Brooklyn 
Style Eatery, 234 Park Street, 
Williamsport, needs waitress. Must be 
able to work Monday through Friday, 
II a.m. to 1 p.m. during lunch rush. 
For information about the job and 
salary, see Barry. 

Voc Diagnostic, 
Single Parents units 
relocate offices 

The coordinators for Vocational 
Diagnostic Services for Handicapped In- 
dividuals and Single Parents and 
Homemakers Guidance and Training 
have recently relocated their offices, ac- 
cording to Ms. Nancy Beightol, one of 
the grant coordinators. 

Ms. Beightol and Ms. Joie B. 
Williams now are in Room 147 in the 
Automotive Trades Center. 

Ms. Beightol said, "As we do not 
yet have a telephone, persons interested 
in receiving services can stop by our of- 
fice or leave their name, address and 
phone number at the Advisement and 
Career Services Center, Learning 
Resources Center." 




Student Housing 
single rooms 

924 W. Third St. 

Just a block from campus 

CALL... 326-6536 



^y^y.^^^^ 



BARRY'S 

BROOKLYN STYLE 
EATERY 




ROOMS FOR RENT 
"Save-A-Buck Specials 
Open 'TO 11 P.M. Didly 



Phi Beta Lambda recruiting continues 

"We're in the midst of this year's recruitment campaign; I think the club is 
getting off to a fresh start," said Paul W. Goldfeder, Phi Beta Lambda adviser 
and assistant professor of business. 

"For the first time in about 15 years, we have very few returning members 
- which means that new members will have an oppurtunity to actively help give 
the club direction," he stated. 

According to Goldfeder, PBL will continue to recruit students this week. 
"We are mainly looking for students who are business or computer science ma- 
jors... Members will develop poise and leadership quaUties." 

Although the club has not yet set a date for its first meeting, Goldfeder said 
returning officers - Barbara Bratton, administrative aide, Lisa Fohner, 
treasurer, Susan Kallansrud, secretary, and Lori Munro, vice president - have 
been making preliminary plans for the club which will be announced during the 
first meeting. 

Plans include a Halloween hayride and a dance. 

Goldfeder said, "Interested members should be aware that the fall 
workshop is scheduled to be held on the Bloomsburg University campus on 
Saturday, Oct. 4. Registration information is forthcoming." 

'Let's Talk' about PIRC 



SPOTUGHTDMradi;, gef(. 15, IfMoT 



Welcome to W.A.C.C.I Whether 
you are a returning student or a new ar- 
rival, this concerns you, so read on. It 
has recently come to my attention that a 
vast majority of the student population 
have no idea what the Peer Information 
and Referral Center |PIRC] is or even 
where it is I 

I'll answer the easiest question 
first. We are located in the gym [actual- 
ly under it| Room 105. Take the third 
[and last] set of double doors across 
from Cillo's on the front of the gym. 
Bear left then head down the back hall, 
it's the first door on the left in that 
hallway. There that wasn't so bad was 
it? 

Now let me try to explain what we 
do. Bear with me; this isn't going to be 
easy. The PIRC is a student run service 
for students; it belongs to you for your 
comfort and convenience. We offer a 
wide range of services including [but not 
limited to] answering your questions 
about where to go and who to talk to [if 
we can't ehminate the problem here]: 
legal problems, drug and alcohol 
counseling, stress management, abor- 
tion and adoption services, mental 
health services, family problems, college 
adjustments for returning adults [or 
anyone else], any personal problems 
with peen [other students], roomates, 
friends, lovers, teachers, or family down 
to counseUng m alternative lifes^les. 

Ever wonder about what a certain 
teacher is like? What tests are Uke? 
Even if you only want someone to 
unload on when tension and stress 
become an obstacle in your education. 
Let's talk, you can come to my office, 



have a cup of coffee and cry in it if 
that's what you need. Why sit around 
and fret? Come in, drop your troubles 
off, and leave. 

All services are completely con- 
fidential which means we can keep a 
secret better than your best friend. You 
will never be ridiculed, laughed at, or 
judged here. What you say and do here 
stays between my ears or one of my 
counselors and doesn't go anywhere 
else. 

You don't have to be in trouble to 
use our service-in fact it's best if you 
catch it before it becomes a problem. If 
you're uncomfortable, scared, or lone- 
ly, come see me. Ifyou can't talk to me 
or if I can't solve your problem I'll dam 
well find someone else who can. 

There's no excuse for you going 
through a bad time alone here at 
W.A.C.C. Many freshmen find a varie- 
ty of problems upon entering college. 
It's a big change and the pressure can be 
unbearable at times, being away from 
family and friends for the first time. 
We've been there and are sympathetic 
to your problems. Come talk my ear 
off, I've always got the time and heart 
for it. 

In the following weeks I'll be 
discussing specific services and pro- 
blems... Any anonymous questions can 
be slipped through the slot in my office 
door... 

...Have a happy, healthy, satisfy- 
ing week. 

R. Lynn SkeriiBild 

Co-onUnitor, PDtC 

Hnmio SenrfcM itndent 

from WnUaiiuport 



collegiate crossword 



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ACROSS 

1 Where one might 
study Andy Warhol 's 
works (3 wds.) 
12 Enrollment Into 

14 "Calculus Hade Sim- 
ple," e.g. (2 wds.) 

16 Evaluate 

17 Extremely small 

18 Follows a recipe 
direction 

19 Belonging to Mr. 
Pad no 

22 Of land measure 

23 Meets a poker bet 

24 Gay (WW II 



Train for a boxing 



43 Return on invest- 
ment (abbr.) 

44 Pondered 

45 Belonging to Mr. 
Starr 

47 Part of the classi- 
fieds (2 wds.) 

48 Possible place to 
study abroad {2 wds) 

52 Small school in Can- 
ton. Ohio (2 wds.) 

53 Orson Welles film 



cla 



sic (2 wd 
DOWN 



19 Political disorder 

20 cit. {footnote 

abbreviation) 

21 Traveled on a 
Flexible Flyer 

24 Glorify 

25 Prosper© 's servant 
in "The Tempest" 

28 Well-known govern- 

29 American league 
team (abbr.) 

30 fictional hypnotist 
32 Style exemplified 



1 Those who a 

2 "Oo unto — 

3 Fourth esta 

4 Goals 

5 Well-known record 
label 

6 Wei 1 -known king 

7 151 to Caesar 

8 Prefix meaning milk 

9 Confused (2 wds.) 



by 1 

33 "She's 

34 Be unwe 

35 Visible 

36 Think 



3; I 



gan 



.for if 



11 Most imnedii 



38 ScnttisI 
and phi' 

39 College 



44 Actress Gibbs 

46 African antelope 

47 Well-known TV banc 

49 Pince 

(eyeglass type) 

50 1968 fil 
Station 

51 1965 fi 
Ryan's 



Zcbri 



73Wr Week's Crossword Puzzle 

Compliments of SPOTUGHT stqff 

Answer next week 



GET members 



Press conference 



to attend 'Expo* this Wednesday 



p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ ■! 

SFREE PIZIAI S 



I Buy any size Little Caesars 

■ Original round pizza at regular 



I. price, get the identical pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 




W.A.C.C. itidenli we 
iddldoDal 10« oal; witk 
iladnt I.D. mi Ikb ad. 



One coupon per customer. Carry out only- At participating locations. 



I« Ca««ai EatttTriJM. I 



Gamma Epsilon Tau, the College 
graphic arts fraternity, is sponsoring a 
trip to tour Graph Expo '86, in 
Philadelphia, on Wednesday, Oct. 22. 

According to Margaret M. DiNar- 
do, GET secretary. Graph Expo '86 is 
one of the largest print shows this year; 
more than 300 companies plan to be 
represented. 

All graphic arts students are being 
encouraged to attend, she said. 

There is a $20 bus fee. Admission 
to the Expo is free. 



There will be a press conference 
Wednesday at 11 a.m. in the College 
Board Room, second floor. Lifelong 
Education Center, according to Dr. 
Miles Williams, dean of employee and 
community relations. 

"The conference concerns an im- 
portant announcement regarding the 
future of the College and Lock Haven 
University," he said. 

A luncheon will follow in Le Jeune 
Chef, the College's student-operated 
restaurant, for those invited to the con- 
ference. 



Next Week: Bulletin Board/SportsCard Return! 



SoSPOTUGHTDMndi;, Scpl. 15, IN* 

Recreation Center hours listed 

The College Rec Center will be open this week 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday, and 7 a.m. to S p.m. on Friday, according to Ms. Sandra 
Rhone, College activities assistant. 

Weekend hours will be II a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. 

Ms. Rhone said she is urging all students to respect Rec Room rules and 
regulations. 



ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIQHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Snaeks 

Hoi and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 




BENSON 



Corner of 3rcl and Maynard Sts. 



i S CCCSSC C CC Ct C WC CS: 




I— i M i LJi. -^— pe3— rjaT .>aac:j)Mftu!— t 



ABC BOWLING LANES 

1245 Park Avenue (at Rose St.) 
College League Sign-Ups 

Men, Women, or Mixed 
Four Persons per Team 

Sign Up - 4 P.M. Sept. 16 
Start - 4 P.M. Sept. 23 
Price $3.25 Free Slioes 



IF YOU WANT TO 
BOWL AND THIS 
TIME DOESN'T FIT 
YOUR SCHEDULE, 
PLEASE PHONE FOR 
OTHER TIMES 

AVAILABLE. 




Performing Artists Series 
debuts: 3 big shows set 

The College will present its first annual Performing Artists Series beginning 
Jan. 31, 1987, according to Mrs. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

A Chorus Line, the Jerry Kravat Entertainment Production Touring Edi- 
tion, will be held Jan. 31 at 8 p.m. in the Scottish Rite Auditorium, downtown 
Williamsport. 

The Touring Company, starring VicU Edwards, Walter Louis and Lynette 
Can, has appeared collectively in 88 different shows in which they have given a 
total of 37,095 performances. 

On Feb. 21, at 8 p.m., comedic entertainer Steve Landesberg will appear, 
also at the Scottish Rite Auditorium. 

Landesberg is best known for his role as Sgt. Arthur Dietrich on the highly 
acclaimed television series, Barney MiUer. 

His other credits include dozens of television programs ranging from the 
Tonight Show to prime time specials. In addition, he recently appeared in his 
own network television special. The Steve Landesberg Television Show. 

Trumpeter Maynard Ferguson is scheduled to appear March 14 at 8 p.m. in 
the Scottish Rite Auditorium. Ferguson, best known for the theme to the movie, 
Rocky, will appear with his new touring band. High Voltage. 

Ferguson and his band perform a variety of tunes, ranging from contem- 
porary fusion charts to jazz standards like Stardust, Body and Soul, and 
Birdland. 

According to Mrs. Fremiotti, season tickets, which includes admission to all 
three shows with varied seating, cost $30 for students, faculty and staff (seatinc 
in a non-reserved section); $35 for the public (seating in a non-reserved section); 
and $40 patron (reserved seating, and name included in the programs for all per- 
formances). 

Mn. Fremiotti pointed out that the reduced price for students, faculty and 
staff is limited to one reduced price per individual. 

"The number of tickets purchased is not limited; however, only one reduc- 
ed ticket per student or employee will be permitted," she said. 

She added, "There is no College reduction on patron tickets." 

In addition, the College is offering employees the opportunity to purchase 
tickets for the series through a payroll reduction plan. For additional informa- 
tion, interested persons may contact the College Activities Office, extension 
7269. 

Season tickets are available at the College Activities Office, Room 108, 
Gymnasium. Students, faculty and staff wishing to receive the reduced price 
must buy tickets through that office, Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

She added that College employees who would like to purchase tickets under 
the payroll reduction plan must obtain them through the same office. 

Season tickets are available to the general public at three locations, in- 
cluding B & S Picture Frames, 400 Market St., Williamsport; the Caboose 
Restaurant, 500 Pine St., Williamsport; and the College Activities Office. 

WWAS is on; request line added 

WW AS 88.1 FM, the College student-operated radio station was to begin 
broadcasting last Friday, according to Harry J. Rogers, public relations/promo- 
tions director for the station. 

Rogers said that during the summer months, a request line was added to the 
station's broadcasting equipment. The telephone number for that line is 
327-4778. 

WWAS will broadcast 8 a.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday. 

Rogers is a broadcasting student from Williamsport. 



Phone 326-2885 for more information 



Free Trophies and Banquet 
Provided by ABC Bowling Lanes 




cwtuoauojl 



Cillo's 

College 

Comer 




PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. TUrd St. 

(Next to the Acadtnic 

Center) 



CHEESE & EGG on MUFHN 
75* REG. 95'taxincld. 

WHOLE TURKEY SUB 

2.35 REG. 2.7(^AX INCLD. 



HOURS* 

Men. tfam Than. 




7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.n 



Partnership formed between College 
and Lock Haven University 

SPOTLIGHT 



Moadi;, Sept. 22, IMt • Vol. 22, No. 5 • I Pifei 
WUUuuiMrl Arei Comnaiilt; CoDcgc • Winitinipon, Pi. 17701 



Lock Haven 
University 
Office to be here 

By Kitli; L. Cobb 
Of Tbe SPOTLIGHT SUff 

The College will join forces with 
Lock Haven University to provide fully 
iinplemented, complementary programs 
to students in the Central and North 
Central Pennsylvania areas, Dr. Robert 
L. Brueder, College president announc- 
ed during a press conference at the 
College last Wednesday. 

Dr. Breuder, who was joined by 
Dr. Craig Dean Willis, president of 
Lock Haven University, said that the 
-agreement includes the estabUshment of 
a Williamsport Office of Lock Haven 
University of the College Campus. 

Dr. WiUis said that office would be 
temporarily manned by James Smalley, 
director of continuing education at Lock 
Haven. 

He indicated that a search would 
be (Conducted for a person to fill the 
newly created position. 

Smalley will be available in Room 
301, Academic Center, on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays ftom 2 to 4 p.m. 

Dr. Breuder and Dr. WiUis both 
stated that approvals will be secured to 
estabUshed a fully operational Lock 
Haven University Center on the cam- 
pus. 

Dr. Breuder said that the partner- 
■■■ Pteast turn lo Page 6 




FLAG FOOTBALL gol underway lut 
week with lots of action. The 
SPOTLIGHT offers the two players pic- 



tured above a "bonai" if they checii in 
with the adviser, Anthony N. Cillo, 
anytime/anywhere today before 4:30 p.m. 



19 student nominations received for Governance committees 



Nineteen student nominations were 
received for membership on Governance 
System Committees, aaording to Dr. 
Jeannette L. Fraser, dean of educational 
research, planning and evaluation. 

"I think we got a good cross sec- 
tion of curriculums," she said, adding 
that some nominations came from facul- 

.1 t*^i4<'.^!fei$«^*^^ vftw^* =i 



IDs today 

at North Campus; 

SGA reps to visit 



ty, and some from other students. 

"We will examine all available in- 
formation - transcripts, cumulative 
averages, and campus reputations. 
From that information, we will deter- 
mine which of the nominees will be in- 
vited to attend an open me^g," she 
stated. 



Ms. Sandra Rhone, Student 
Government Association adviser, and 
two returning SGA senators will visit 
the North Campus from 1 to 7 p.m. to- 



She added, "This will hopefully be 
done within this week, because we will 
need to conduct interviews next week. 
At that time, decisions will be made as 
to which students will serve on which 
committees. We're trymg to move this 
along, so that we can have our first 
'real' meeting." 



Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

Returning senators Karen L. 
Campbell, graphic arts student from 



day to take ID photos and to discuss the Moscow, and Joshua J. Burke, graphic 



Student Government Association with 
students, according to Ms. JoAnn R. 



arts student from York, will accompany 
and assist Ms. Rhone. 



The Internal Governance System 
will make College decision-making 
easier and more efficient, she said, ad- 
ding that students who serve on commit- 
tees will be given an opportunity to be 
vocal, to have input, and to generally 
"make a difference." 

Deadline Oct. 3 

for December gradaates 

Friday, Oct. 3, is the deadline for 
December graduates to file petitions for 
graduation. 

The petitions must be filed at the 
Student Records Wmdow in the 
Academic Center. 

Diplomas ordered after Oct. 3 will 
require a SIO late charge payment. 



2aSPOTUGHTDMiM4lT, Sept. U, IfH 

'Our House' looks like a winner 

T*l*>lilon comnwnt by Todd Eggtr, ol Th* SPOTUQHT 8UH 

NBC does II agalnl 

With thB coming of Fall and the new television season, the three major 
networks will once again be battling It out to see which of their newest pro- 
grams will come out on top. 

One contender for this ongoing fight Is NBC's "Our House" starring 
Wllford Brimely from "Cocoon," ■ -n-.e and Deldre Hall of the daytime series 
"Days of Our Lives " 

In the 60 minute debut special, Jessie WItherspoon (Hall), a widow with 
three kids who Is unable to manage after her husband's death, packs up and 
takes herself and family to live with widower father-in-law (Brimley). 

While all have trouble adjusting to their new lifestyle, they do find a deep 
love and respect for one another - which makes the setting for some very 
awkward but touching moments that are sure to bring a smile to the faces of 
everyone who watches. 

"Our House"ls on every Sunday night at 7 p m. 



The SPOTLIGHT has 



m 







1 %,.^ 



1 



a new phone number: 
Ext. #553 
Recreation Center hours listed 

The College Rec Center will be open this week 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday 
througb Thursday, and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, according to Ms. Sandra 
Rhone, College activities assistant. 

Weekend hours will be 11 a.m. to S p.m., Saturday and Sunday. 

Ms. Rhone said she is urgiog all student! to respect Rec Room rules and 
regulations. 



SGA 

STUDENT ACTION 

Concern/Suggestion Form 



Write Your Concern in This Space: 



Write Your Suggestion to the Problem: 



Date Sutimltted: 

[Ctieck Appropriate Items] Student: Yes No- 

Full-tlme Part-time Ofhec 

Curriculum: 

NAME: 

LOCAL ADDRESS: 



TELEPHONE: 
SIGNATURE IREQUIRED]: 



I 






Jody F. McConneU, leiming rcMorcei lechnictl ualituil, aiding Brenda M. 
VIbert, Jonmiliim itndeni from Mancy, in library research. 

The Ubrary ii open Monday through Thnnday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. ind 
on Fridays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. On Sundays, the library ii open from 2 
to 9 p.m. 

'Let's get serious' says adviser: 
Is it Garfield or is it Peanuts? 

"Let's get serious," muttered Anthony N. Cillo, faculty adviser to The 
SPOTLIGHT last week after the student newspaper's weekly staff meeting. 

"We've got to get this thing going... Do they want 'Garfield' or do they 
want 'Peanuts'? 

Eyeballing the staff - most of whom were remaining undeclared and most 
of whom are knowledgeable of the adviser's penchant for cats - he declared: 
"Make it democratic. Appoint a committee." 

...And 50... The Great Garfield vs. Peanuts Debate begins... 

For whom wlO you volt? GmfltUf Peanuts? 
SPOTLIGHT readers soon will determine which of the popular eomie strips 
will be carried in the weekly newspaper. 

Fire College Weekend 
set for Oct. 4, 5 

Fire College Weekend, an annual two-day training session for area 
firefighters, will be held Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 4 and 5, at the College and 
other locations throughout the community. 

According to Mrs. Barbara A. Danko, director of Lifelong Education, 900 
firefighters have registered for the event and at least 100 more are expected. 

Fire Department Rescue and Basic Fire Fighting are among the many 
courses to be offered this year. 

Fire College Weekend is sponsored by the Central Area Fire Chiefs' 
Association, the College, and the Lyocming County Department of Emergency 
Services. 



SPOTUQHT 
Monday, S*pL 22, ■«•• - Vol. 22, No. 6 

Ttie SPOTUQHT Is published each Monday momino of the academic year, ex- 
cept for College vacations, by joumallam and other Interested students of The 
Wtlllamsport Area Community College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1006 W. Third St., Wllllameport, Pa. 
17701 Telephone; (717) 328-3761, Extension 75,63. 



STAFF THIS ISSUE 
Kalhy L Cobb, Brenda M. VIbert LIh B. Lumbard, Ruth Ann HIiMn, Todd A. 
Eggw, Catlwrln. A. H.nnon, Brian M. HoUlngamHlh, Michael Waldron, Angela 



Baltimore bus trip 
ticket deadline 
this Wednesday 

Seats are still available for the bus 
trip to Baltimore Inner Harbor, accor- 
ding to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities, but the 
deadline is this Wednesday. 

The trip is scheduled for Saturday, 
Oct. 4. 

"Interested persons should be 
aware that the deadUne for reservations 
is this Wednesday. If we don't get 
enough reservations, the bus will have 
to be cancelled," she said. 
Greek festival 

Ms. Fremiotti said that many in- 
teresting events are taking place near the 
harbor during this time of the year, in- 
cluding many art and flower exhibits, 
performances by the Baltimore Sym- 
phony, and a Greek Festival. 

Other attractions include the 
aquarium, the Baltimore Zoo, the 
Power Plant, and the B&O Railroad 
Museum. 

Coit lilted 

The cost per ticket is $16 for 
students, faculty, staff, and alumni of 
the College, and $18 for the pubhc. The 
money is not refundable, the coor- 
dinator pointed out. 

Interested persons may call Ms. 
Fremiotti at Ext. 7269 or visit the Col- 
lege Activities Office, first floor of the 
gym, before 4:30 p.m. 

New York City 
bus reservations 
still being taken 

Reservations are still being taken 
for two bus trips scheduled to go to New 
York City, on Saturdays, Dec. 6 and 
13, according to Ms. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

"There are more seats available on 
the trip scheduled," she commented. 

Tickets are $20 for students, facul- 
ty, staff and alumni of the College, and 
$22 for the public. 

Reservations may be made by call- 
ing College Ext. 7269 or visiting Ms. 
Fremiotti's office on the first floor of 
the gym. 

Ms. Fremiotti emphasized that 
students, faculty and staff are entitled to 
one reduced price per ID. All other 
must pay the price of pubUc tickets, 
even if they are accompanying someone 
from the College. 

Movie tickets avaUable 
in College Boolutore 

UA movies tickets may be purchas- 
ed at the Bookstore during regular 
bookstore hours - 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
aaording to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
College activities coordinator. 

UA tickets may be used at any 
theatre and cost $2.50. The Student 
Government Association sponsors the 
ticket sales. 




SportsCard 

Today: 

Basketball and Volleyball leagues.. .4 p.m. to 
10 p.m. in the gym. 

Karate class. ..7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the gym 

Weight Room open. ..7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the 
gym. 
Tomorrow Sept 23: 

Open gym.. .4 p.m. to 10 p.m., leagues will be 
in play. 

Weight Room cUnic...4 p.m. to 6 p.m. 
Wedneidiy, Sept 24: 

Leagues in play.. .4 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

Weight Room open. ..open gym. 
Tbnndiy, Sept 25: 

Leagues in play.. .4 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

Weight Room open... Open Gym. 

Karate class. ..7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the gym. 

A weight training clinic will be held tomorrow, 
Tuesday. Sept. 23, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the 
weight room. Cathy A. Peterman, the woman's 
fitness director at the YMCA, will be running the 
clinics, and also will be available for any questions 
on how to start your own fitness program. 

Staff and faculty interested in forming a 
volleyball league should see Ms. Margot R. Bayer, 
evening activities assistant, in the gym. Room 209, 
or call Extension 7416 after 1:30 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday. 



SrOTUGHTaMoa^r, Sen. 21, 1N(d3 

BULLETIN BOARD 

Monday, Sept. 22 through Sunday, Sept. 28 

MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega Fellowship - 7 to 9 p.m., 
tomorrow, Tuesday, Room 133, Academic Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau - business meeting, noon 
to 1 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous - 7 p.m., Wednesday, 
Room BI07, Lifelong Education Center. 

Service & Operation of Heavy Equipment 
Association - 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., tomorrow,Tues- 
day, Room 319, Academic Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda - general meeting, tomor- 
row, Tuesday, 3:30 p.m.. Room 329, Academic 
Center. 

Student Government Association - ex- 
ecutive/Senate meeting, tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 
23, 4 p.m., Room B107, Lifelong Education 
Center; officer elections. 

EVENTS 

Voter Registration - League of Women 
Voten, voter registration. Lifelong Education 
Center lobby, II a.m. to 2 p.m., next Monday, 
Sept. 29, sponsored by the Student Government 
Association. 

Bus Trip - Baltimore Inner Harbor Bus Trip, 
7 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 4, $16 to 
W.A.C.C. students, faculty, staff, and alumni, and 
$18 for the public. Contact College Activities Office 
in Gym. 

Forestry Qub Woodsmen Meet - Sunday, 
Oct. 5, Wheeling, W. Va., all day. 

MOVIE 

Three Brothers - A Film Society presentation, 
7:30 to 10:30 p.m., next Thursday and Friday, 
Oct. 9 and 10, Academic Center Auditorium. 

BUS TRIPS 

New York City - Sitanby, Dec. 6, 6 a.m. to 
9 p.m., $20 for W.A.C.C. itndeoU, faculty, staff, 
and atamiii. $22 for pnblk. Contact CoOcge Ac- 
IhitiM OfOce in Gym. 

New York City - Satnrday, Dec. 13, i a.m. 
to 9 p.m., same ai above. 

BAKE SALE 

A bake sale sponsored by the Human Services 
Club will be held from 8 a.m. to 1p.m. this 
Friday,SEpt. 26, in the Academic Center Lobby. 
PERFORMING ARTISTS SERIES 

...begins in January, but season tickets now 
available for Maynard Ferguson, "A Chorus 
Line", and Steve Landesberg. Call Ext. 7269. 



Garfield ii O.K. 
Any cat that likei 
PIZZA can't be aU badl 



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One coupon per customer Cany out only. At participating locations 



4D8POTLlGBTDMoidi;, Sept. 11, 1M( 

SGA senators meet informally, 

New and returning senators for the Student Government Association met 
for the first time last Tuesday in an informal "Let's get acquainted with each 
other and the SGA" meeting, according to Sandra Rhone, SGA adviser. 

Also in attendance were the newly-appointed committee chairpersons and 
committee members. 

During the meeting, the group was addressed by Dr. Jeannette L. Fraser, 
dean of educational planning, research, and evaluation, concerning the Internal 
Governance System and SGA's role within that system. 

Dr. Fraser ewxplained that the SGA will be permitted to appoint two 
members to sit on the College Council, through which all College decision- 
making recommendations will flow, before reaching the College president or the 
Board of Trustees. 



PBL to meet 
tomorrow; picnic 
to be Thursday 

Phi Beta Lambda, the College's 
business fraternity, will hold its first 
meeting tomorrow at 3:30 p.m., in 
Room 329, Academic Center, according 
to Lisa Folmer, PBL treasurer. 

Miss Folmer said that the items to 
be discussed include election of a new 
president and club activities such as a 
dance and a hayride. 

The meeting will be open to new 
and returning members. 

Picnic plinned 

Paul W. Goldfeder, PBL adviser 
and assistant professor of business, said 
that the group will meet at his home 
This Thursday for an outdoor buffet 
picm'c. ' 

"This will be our 12th annual pic- 
nic," he said, adding that all current 
members and potential members are in- 
vited. 

Goldfeder said that directions to 
his home are available in his office. 
Room 305, ACC. 



'Go Get Squeezed' 

Week being observed; 

students helping 

This week is 'Go Get Squeez- 
ed Week' in Lycoming County. 

Blood pressure screening will 
be available at various business 
and industry sites, according to 
Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, College 
activities coordinator. 

Practical nursing students 
will be available to do screening 
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., tomorrow 
and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday 
in the following locations: first 
floor of the Academic Center, 
Lifelong Education Center, Room 
B107, and the Learning Resource 
Center lobby. 




ONE OF THE MANY DISPLAYS dnriof lut week's DoBoUtown Garden 
Clnb Flower Show... A complete report will be presented In next week's 
SPOTUGHT. 

63 faculty and staff named 
to Governance committees 



It's Peannti for mel 

A Dog ii Min'i belt 
friend... And SNOOPY 
is a dog... whether 
he beUevei it or not! 



Sixty-three College faculty and per- 
sonnel recently were elected/appointed 
to serve on five Internal Governance 
System committees, according to Dr. 
Jeannette L. Fraser, dean of educational 
research, planning, and evaluation. 

"I think we got a good response to 
the elections process," she said, clarily- 
ing by commenting that over 70 percent 
of the College employees participated. 

Dr. Fraser said that the next move 
will be elections of committee chairper- 



hear about Governance System 

"This is perhaps the first opportunity for students to have a real voice in 
what goes on at the College," she said, adding that the SGA shouyld select two 
students who are vocal, not easily intimidated, and who are able to take a stand. 

Also during the meeting, new and returning senators nominated officers for 
the new academic year. 

The nominations process, however, was ruled invalid by Ms. Rhone and 
Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, College activities coordinator. 

"The nominations process which was used did not follow proper 
parliamentary procedure," Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

Therefore, according to Ms. Rhone, nominations will have to be done 
again during tomorrow's meeting. 

Other items the group considered included student activities such as a dance 
and other options. 

Italian film 
to be shown 

"Three Brothers," a film directed 
by Francesco Rosi, will be shown by 
The Film Society from Oct. 9 through 
12. 

A story of three brothers who 
return to their family homestead for 
their mother's funeral, the movie is set 
in present-day Italy. The fihn shows the 
contrast of their very different lives 
along with their father's remembrances 
of his wedding day. 

Showings will be 8 p.m., Thursday 
and Friday in the Academic Center 
Auditorium and 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 
p.m. Sunday in the Lycoming College 
Art Center. 

Film Society members may attend 

any film this season and purchase 

another ticket at any time. Prices are: 

Five Admission Membership 

-$I5 

Ten Admission Membership 
-J25 

Non-members - $4.50 admis- 
sion at the door. 

Further information is available by 
calling 398-7227, 327-1502, or 
326-1090. 



Cillo invited 
to lead sessions 
at workshop 

Anthony N. Cillo, associate pro- 
fessor of journalism, will lead two ses- 
sions during the Ninth annual High 
School Journalism Workshop sponsored 
by The Pottsville Republican, a Pulitzer 
Prize winning newspaper. 

The workshop will be held Thurs- 
day, Oct. 2, at the Penn State Universi- 
ty Schuylkill Campus. 

Cillo will conduct a morning 
workshop session on newswriting and 
an afternoon session on feature writing. 

The workshop usually attracts 
hundreds of high school students involv- 
ed in school publications work. 

Three members of The 
SPOTLIGHT staff will accompany 
Cillo to the workshop. They are Kathy 
L. Cobb, managing editor; Brenda M. 
Vibert, editorial page editor, and Don- 
na L. Trimble, photography editor. 



sons from within the committees 
themselves. 

In addition, she said, the nomina- 
tions process for members who will 
serve on the College Council is currently 
in progress and that will be followed by 
an election. 

Nineteen student nominations were 
received and are cunently being review- 
ed. 

[Editor's Note: Space limitations 
precluded listing of newly elected/ap- 
pointed members. Watch for complete 
listing in next week's SPOTLIGHT.! 



JOB-OPs 

IitformalioH supplied by College 
Advisement and Career Services Office 
in the Learning Resources Center. In- 
quiries should be directed to that office. 

Part-Time - Beiter's would like to 
hire a cifpeotr; ttndeai for warehouse 
and delivery work. 20 hours per week 
on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. 
Call Dave Eisworth at 326-2073. 

Carl Haga Chevrolet, Inc -Milton, 
Pa. has an opening for a person to work 
4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Fri- 
day and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. 
Would be answering telephone, taking 
in money, and working on computer. 
Apply in person. 

Part-time Bookkeeper ~ Wabash 
Sylvania Employees Federal Credit 
Union, 1050 E. Broad St., Mon- 
toursville. Pa. 17734, has an opening 
for a part-time permanent bookkeeper 8 
a.m. to noon, five days a week. $3 an 
hour. Send resume to the attention of 
Mrs. Holmes or caliber at 368-2691, 
Ext. 327, for an appomtment for an in- 
terview. 

Babysitters - Several babysitters 
needed fourth Thursday of every month 
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. for the Christian 
Women's Association, $20 per person. 
Call Trisha Hofstrom at 998-2191. 

Clerks and carriers - Several 
students needed to work part-time at 
the Williamsport Post Office as clerks 
and carriers. Must provide certification 
of being at least 18 years of age and of 
being a student at the College. Call 
Thesea at 322-3573 for an appointment 
for an interview. 

Photographer - photographer for 
sports, mostly in late afternoon and 
some evenings. Call 326-9599 and talk 
to Sally Laird. 

'Shape Up' program 
being offered in town 

The Williamsport Y.M.C.A. and 
the Williamsport Recreation Commis- 
sion are holding an eight-week program 
designed to strengthen the heart and 
lungs. The program is called "Shape 
Up." 

Each class includes a series of 
warm up, stretch out, vigorous and cool 
down exercises. Students will learn to 
increase the efficiency of their body 
movements without excessive stress on 
their heart and lungs, according to in- 
formation from the Rec Commission. 

The program is held in the Jackson 
Elementary School on Monday and 
Wednesday evenings from 6:45 p.m. to 
7:45 p.m. It began Sept. 8 and con- 
tinues through Oct. 22. 

Another class is held in the Stevens 
Elementary School on Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings from 6:45 p.m. to 
7:45 p.m. It began Sept. 9 and con- 
tinues through Oct. 22. 



Trek for Life and Breath 
scheduled for Oct. 3 through 5 
hikers orientation this Wednesday 



Hikers from all parts of the state 
will be taking part in the sixth annual 
Trek for Life and Breath, which will 
begin Friday, Oct. 3, near Hillsgrove 
and is scheduled to end Sunday, Oct. 5, 
at World's End State Park. 

The event, which was the first of its 
kind in Lycoming and Sullivan Coun- 
ties, is sponsored by the Central Penn- 
sylvania Lung and Health Services 
Association. 

Hiken nlM pledges 

The hikers, who raise pledges 
before the trek, will meet at Camp 
Lycogis Girl Scout Camp and traverse a 
25-mile course of the Loyalsock Trail. 

The hikers will have a Warmup Get 
Together Friday evening at the Scout 
Camp and a hikers breakfast Saturday 
morning. Four miles will be covered Fri- 
day, 11 miles Saturday, and 10 miles 
Sunday. The trek ends with barbeques, 
t-shirts, and patches for all participants 

Local hospital 
to hold cocaine 
unfonnation night 

Because of great pubUc concern 
over the powerfully addictive drug 
"crack," the Muncy Valley Hospital is 
holding a cocaine information night at 
the Holiday Inn, 1840 E. Third St., 
Williamsport, accordmg to Mrs. Janet 
Querifflit, College nurse. 

The meeting will be held 
Thursday.Sept. 25, at 7:30 p.m., and 
will last approximately two hours. 

Principal speaker for the event will 
be Dr. Bruce K. Branin, assistant 
medical director, Marmotli Medical 
Center, Waverly, Pa. 

Following Dr. Branin's presenta- 
tion, there will be a formal ques- 
tion/answer time, and free information 
will be available. 

Carry the number, 
says College nurse 

Students covered by their parents' 
insurance carrier would be wise to carry 
the insurance number with them, said 
Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, College nurse. 

At Convenient Care and local 
hospitals, it is the student's responsibili- 
ty to provide this information at the 
time of treatment to avoid parents bemg 
billed directly for services provided, she 
said. 

Bookstore offers 
discount on tools 

The College Bookstore has an 
overstock of electrician's high quality 
tools. These are priced to meet competi- 
tion with an additional 10 percent off 
through Tuesday, Sept. 30, according to 
Mrs. Eleonore R. Holcomb, superviser 
of the College Bookstore. 



gPOTUGHTaMoidi;, g«p(. 22, IMtoS 

American Samoa 
Community College 
president to visit 
here today 

Dr. EneUko Sofa'i, president of 
American Samoa Community College, 
will talk to College staff today about the 
, . . , . possibiUty of students coming from 

the backpackmg experience, the Lung American Samoa to the Williamsport 
Assoaation provides the wilderness ex- Area Community CoUege. 



on Sunday afternoon, 

Novicei welcoaw 

All meals and trail food are fur- 
nished by sponsoring Stroehmann 
Bakeries Incorporated. 

In an effort to introduce novices to 



penence at no cost to the hiker. One 
orientation session is planned to provide 
participants with route details, equip- 
ment needs and first aid information. 

"The orientation session," aaor- 
ding to Lauren Anderson, trek chairper- 
son, "is extremely important to the 
hiker. It is staffed," she said, "with 
highly skilled hiking and backpacking 
experts." She explained that the 
volunteers and staff of the Lung 
Association try to offer knowledge, 
skills and tips to the hikers for which 
they might otherwise pay. 

The orientation session is schedul- 
ed for this Wednesday, Sept. 24, from 7 
p.m. until 9 p.m. at Central Penn- 
sylvania Lung and Health Services 
Association offi(y, 531 W. Fourth St., 
Williamsport. 

Rei^jlntlon forms ivillible 

Registration forms are available at 
many local backpacking and related 
busmesses and the Lung Association of- 
fice at 531 W. Fourth St., Williamsport. 



According to information from 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of the 
Advisement and Career Services Center, 
Dr. Sofa'i will be accompanied by G. 
Robert Converse, a former staff member 
of the College. 

Dr. Sofa'i is in the United States to 
attend a Title III meeting m Baltimore. 

Included in his schedule here today 
is a tour of the Academic Center and 
academic divisions located there, a 
meeting with Dr. Robert L. Breuder, 
CoUege president, and Dean William 
Martin, dean of student services, a tour 
of tile Industiial Technology Ddvision, 
and tours of other areas of particular in- 
terest to him. 



BOW, QUIVER FOR SALE 
45- lo 6S-ponDd compoond bow 

with qaiver. Preciiion brand. 

Camonfliged. $55.00. 322-6819 after 5 

p.m. [advt.J 



^ •••••••••••••••••••••• -K 



The 
Williamsport Area Community College 



FIRST ANNUAL 



Calendai 



Contest 



Atteniion artists! 

The Collegt is sponsoring a calendar art 
communily. 

We arc searching for an originaJ pen-and-ink drawing from among our students, faculty 
and staff- The winning entry will receive both priie money and publication credit 
calendar. 



) be open to all members of the College 



1987 



GRAND PRIZE $100 



You need not be an estabUshed artist or have a particular "style". All that is required is an 
ability to draw neatly and accurately in pen and ink. 

This year's subject is The Academic Center 

Deadline for entries is November 3. I9B6 

This is a juried competition and certain restrictions apply. For a complete description and a 
list of rules, visit the College Information Office on the second floor of the Lifelong Education 
Center. 

Good Luck! 



* ••••••••••••••••••••••* 



6aSrOTUGHTDM<M4i;, StU. 12, lUt 



More tuition subsidies awarded 



Tuition subsidies from local 
businesses for students at the College 
have been announced, according to 
Donald S. Shade, director of financial 
aid. 

All subsidy selections are made by 
the College Fmancial Aid office, and are 
worth from S25.25 per credit, up to a 

HOSA elects 
'86-'87 officers 

Bj Todd Effitr 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Stiff 

The local chapter of the Health Oc- 
cupations Students of America recently 
elected officers for the academic year. 

Mrs. Janet A. Barbour, HOSA ad- 
viser and health instructor, listed the of- 
ficers: 

Kitrina Cbaapel, of Canton, presi- 
dent; HaUie Fanar, of Montgomery, 
vice president; Stephenie Kiessling, of 
Williamsport, secretary, and Deana 
Hall, of Williamsport, treasurer. 

The delegate to the 1987 Penn- 
sylvania HOSA convention will be 
Cherri Castle, of Canton. 

Helps itodenls develop 
The adviser explained that HOSA is 
an organization that helps students 
develop a better vocational understan- 
ding, an awareness of social intelligence, 
civil consciousness, and leadership 
skills. 

The local chapter consists of eight 
secondary students and the adviser. 

They meet weekly to discuss fund- 
raising projects for group trips and are 
cunently planning trips to Washington, 
D.C., and to Baltimore. 

Two convenlloni 

Mrs. Barbour also stated that the 
local chapter will be participating in 
two conventions this academic year. 

The first is the Central District 
Training Session on Oct. 17 at Bradford 
County AVTS. Members, she said, will 
have the opportunity to meet members 
from other HOSA chapters and to im- 
prove leadership skills. 

The second is the Annual Penn- 
sylvania HOSA Convention at Host 
Farms, Lancaster, from April 1 to April 
3. Students from the local chapter will 
be selected by their adviser to par- 
ticipate in competitive events such as 
medical spelling, standard flrst 
aid/CPR, and a talent show. 



r Girfield, ^ 



maximum of S404, Shade said. 

The following students were recent- 
ly awarded subsidies: Margaret E. Lit- 
tle, business management student from 
South Williamsport; Christopher A. 
Noble, computer science student from 



Lock Haven 
University 



Elks offering 
scholarship: see 
Financial Aid 

The Elks National Founda- 
tion is again offering a vocational 
scholarship, according to an an- 
nouncement from the Financial 
Aid Office in the Academic 
Center. 

The scholarship is in the 
amount of {1,000 for each of two 
years. This would be for 1987-88. 

The student must be enrolled 
for at least 12 credits in a program 
culminating with an associate 
degree or certificate, but less than 
a bachelor's. 

AppUcations are available in 
the Financial Aid Office, Room 
201, Academic Center." 

The deadline is Nov. 25. 



Co-Op Newsletter 
published for September 

The "CO-OP NEWSLETTER", a 
publication of the College's cooperative 
education/experiential learning office, 
has been published for September. 

The newsletter notes that each 
academic division of the College is 
represented by one or more experiental 
learning coordinators. 

Students with questions may call 
the Experiential Learning Office (Room 
157, Learning Resources Center) at Ext. 
7239. 



BARRY'S 

BROOKLYN STYLE 
EATERY 




ROOMS FOR RENT 
"Save-A-Buck Specials 
Open 'TU 11 P.M. Daily 



Williamsport; Stephen R. Shaffer, 

diesel technology student from South CHflfP tfi hp hPfP 

WiUiamsport, and Patricia R.Eagleson, VU**'^ *^ '^'^ "^'^ 

accounting student from Montoursville. Continued fiom Page lUmm 

Shade said that he is reminding 
students from Cherry Township, in 
Sullivan County, that they may be eligi- 
ble to receive tuition subsidies. Students 
interested should see either the township 
or the College's financial aid office. 



Writing contest 
deadline nears 

The Amy Foundation recently an- 
nounced its annual awards program, 
open to creative writers who've "ex- 
pressed God's position on cunent world 
affairs". 

Issues must be relevant, and deser- 
ving of attention, according to the an- 
nouncement. 

To be eligible, submitted articles 
must have been published in the secular 
media in 1986 and be postmarked 
before January 1987. 

Prizes include a $10,000 first prize 
and range to a $1,000 fifth place prize. 
Winners will be announced May 1, 
1987. 

All entries should be forwarded to 
The Amy Foundation Writing Awards, 
P.O. Box 16091, Lansing, MI 48901. 



ship would permit students who are in- 
terested in achieving a bachelor's degree 
to do so at the College, through the im- 
plementation of Lock Haven's program- 
ming, some of which will be available 
on this campus. 

In addition, students who attend 
the University will have an opportunity 
to attend courses at the College. 

Dr. Breuder said that last year a 
program was developed between the two 
institutions which would enable students 
to obtain a bachelor's degree in general 
studies for management of technology. 

Both presidents were optimistic 
about the partnership, with Dr. Willis 
commenting, "We believe that the two 
of us can do more for the region work- 
ing together rather than separately in 
terms of developing new, viable pro- 
grams which will be instrumental in 
Central Pennsylvania's transition to 
new types of industry." 

A formal agreement was signed at 
the press conference by both presidents, 
and by Mrs. Kathryn W. Lumley, 
chairperson of the College Board of 
Trustees, and William F. WiUiams, 
chairperson of the Council of Trustees 
of Lock Haven University. 



|p»r 



maanaKxMCMMtuaaK)] 



ABC BOWLING LANES 

1245 Park Avenue (at Rose St.) 
College League Sign-Ups 

Men, Women, or Mixed 
Four Persons per Team 

Sign Up - 4 P.M. Sept. 16 
Start - 4 P.M. Sept. 23 
Price $3.25 Free Shoes f 



IF YOU WANT TO 
BOWL AND THIS 
TIME DOESN'T FIT 
YOUR SCHEDULE, 
PLEASE PHONE FOR 
OTHER TIMES 

AVAILABLE. 




Phone 326-2885 for more information 

Free Trophies and Banquet 
Provided by ABC Bowling Lanes 



Human Services Club names 
officers, thanks supporters 

Report b; Muta Ctnle, Chb repoitcr 

The Human Services Club wishes to thank everyone who supported the 
club's first meeting, according to the club advisers. 

"The turnout was fantastic and with your continued support we know the 
club will be a great success," said Trish M. Knuil, newly-appointed president. 

"A reminder," she added: "Dues are $2 per person per semester and must 
be paid on or before Oct.lO." 

Club officers who have been appointed are Trish M. KnuU, of 
Williamsport, president; Connie Robbins, of Loyalsock Township, co-president; 
Andrea Braim, of Williamsport, secretary; Debby J. Hughey, of Williamsport, 
treasurer, and Maria C. Casale, of Williamsport, reporter. All are human ser- 
vices majors. 

Faculty advisers are Thomas A. Zimmerman, instructor of human service 
and social sciences; Dr. Richard Sahn, instructor of sociology and psychology, 
and Dr. Roy Fontaine, professor of psychology. 

"We welcome everyone to join us," the new president said, adding, 
"Meeting times are posted and published in the SPOTLIGHT." 



8P0TUGBTOM<ndar, 8cp(. 21, intD? 




ACTION IN FLAG FOOTBALL inclnded these pliyen. play contiDne). See 
SPORTSCARD on page 3. 

Sasquehanna Room Mena 

Monday, Sept. 22 - Lnnch 

Rigatoni, small tossed salad, Italian bread, $2.19; Chicken nuggets, potato 
and vegetable, $2.59. 

Monday, Sept. 22 - Dinner 

BBQ, hamburger steak, potato and vegetable, $2.39; enchilades, potato, 
and vegetable, $2.89. 
Tneiday, Sept. 23 - Lnnch 

Beef & peppers over rice, potato and vegetable, $2.S9; triple salad platter, $2,59. 
Tatidar, Sept. 23 - Dinner 

Shrimp Creole, potato or vegetable, $2.95; Baked ham, fruit sauce, potato & 
vegetable, $2.89. 
Wednciday, Sept. 24 - Lnnch 

Spanish rice, pork cutlet, Italian bread, $2.39; roast beef, potato & vegetable, 
$2.59. 

Wednesday, Sept. 24 - Dinner 

Roast filled chicken breast, potato & vegetable, $2.89; roast pork, potato & 
vegetable, $2.89. 
Tbonday, Sept. 25 - Lnnch 

Ham, broccoli benedict over muffin, $2.59; Stromboli & fries, $2.89. 
Ttannday, Sept. 25 - Dinner 

Breaded scallops, potato & vegetable, $2.95; Swedish meatballs, gravy potato & 
vegetable, $2.39. 
Friday, Sept. U - Lunch 

Turkey breast, gravy, potato and vegetable, $2.59; Veal steak, lemon sauce, 
potato & vegetable, $2.59. 
Friday, Sept. 2li - Dinner 

Sausage Calabrese, vegetable and Kaiser roll, $2.59; macaroni & cheese, 
vegetable, $2.59 



collegiate camouflage 



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Can you find the hidden legal terms ? 



ABATE 

ACT OF GOD 

AGENCY 

ARBITRATION 

BAILMENT 

CAVEAT EMPTOR 

CONSIDERATION 

DAMAGES 

DEED 



FRANCHISE 

LIEN 

MARTIAL LAW 

NOVATION 

PATENT 

PRIVITY 

PROBATE 

PROOF 

PROXY 



DURESS 

EASEMENT 

ESCROW 

ESTOPPEL 

FELON 

REMEDY 

SUBPOENA 

SUMMONS 

TORT 

TRUST 



This Week's Puzzle Brought to You By 

Mignano Sob Shop 

869 Second St. • WIDlanuport • Phone 323-7443 




Last Week'i Answer 



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Bloodmobile here in October 

A Bloodmobile visit sponsored by the Student Government Association will 
be made at the College in October, according to Ms. Sandra Rhone, SGA ad- 
viser. 

The Bloodmobile will be at the Earth Science Center on Oct. 16, and on 
Main Campus on Oct. 21 and 22. 

A goal of 450 pints has been set. 



SasrOTUGHTDMndi;, 8cpl. 22, ItM 




Nursing alumna 
selected 1986 
Nurse of the Year 

Kim Smith Sander, a graduate of 
the College's practical nursing program, 
was selected as the Jersey Shore 
Hospital 1986 Nurse of the Year by her 
fellow workers, according to Mrs. Linda 
Falchek-Clark. 

The July issue of the Jersey Shore 
Hospital "Health Beat" reported that 
she received the award at a reception 
during National Nurse Week. 

She has been employed by the 
Jersey Shore Hospital for four years. 

In photo at 1^ are Mrs. Betsy 
Crossley, Jersey Shore Hospital direc- 
tor of clinical services: Kim Smith 
Sander, and Thomas S. Lawton Jr., ex- 
ecutive director of the Jersey Shore 
Hospital. ICounesy photo] 



Alcoholics hotline 
ready for callers 

There is help for alcoholics from 
Dial-a-Sober-Thought, sponsored by 
the Gateway Rehabilitation Center in 
Pittsburgh, according to Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit, College nurse. 

A new thought is recorded daily to 
aid alcoholics in their recovery process. 
The phone number for Pennsylvania 
residenU is 1-800-437-6237. 

Those outside of Pennsylvania may 
call 1-800-457-6237. 



Early Warning Cards issued; 
seminars scheduled for help 



Cillo's 

College 

Comer 

PHONE 322-1321 

UN W. TUrd St. 

(Neitto 

Ike Academic Ceiter) 

THIS WEEK'S 
SPECIALS 

Bacon -k Qeese -k Egg 
Sub 
$1.50 TAX mcu) Reg. $1.1 

Cold Ham & Cheese 
Whole Sub 

$3.UU TAX INCLO 

Reg. $3.35 

HOURS* 

Men. thru Thura. 

7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. lo 4 p.m. 



Early Warnings Cards were 
distributed last week by instructors, ac- 
cording to Lawrence W. Emery Jr., 
director of Advisement and Career Ser- 
vices. 

The cards are issued to students 
suffering from academic difficulty, so 
that they may prepare for mid-term ex- 
ams, he stated. 

Emery said, as part of that, the ad- 
visement center and the library will be 
offering the following seminars: 

The Advisement and Career Ser- 
vices will offer Study Skills Seminars to- 
day, and tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 
and next Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 
29 and 30. 



Student referrals should be sent to 
Jocelyn K. Thomas, secretary, in the 
Advisement and Career Services Center, 
room 1S7, of the Learning Resources 
Center to make appropriate ar- 
rangements. 

The seminars are scheduled for 
4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. in Room 155, LRC. 

Library Research Skills Seminars 
will be held tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 
23, and next Tuesday, Sept. 30, from 7 
p.m. to 8 p.m., and this Thursday, 
Sept. 25, and next Thursday Oct. 2, 
from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

Faculty should refer students to 
report to the College library circulation 
desk to sign up. 



;":2;*':£;"a;"^*':^*»4i'*^**:ai":ai**:i;"*"<S"isi":a;**4;'»:a;«»:a:":a;«*a;**ai"a;*»:a:*»je;"i 

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ALL NIQHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Snacks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



BENSON 





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Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. || 




Student 
Housing 



SINGLE 
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924 W. Third St. 

A Block from Campus 

and 

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SPOTLIGHT 

Mondi;, Sept. 29, 1986 • Vol. 22, No. 6 • 8 Pigo 
WilUmuport Arei Commniitty College • Wllliuiuport, Pt. 17701 



College/LHU committee 
to determine coursework 
to be offered 



A comminee is being set up to 
determine which areas of courseworic 
will be made available on our campus, 
said Dr. James E. Middleton, dean of 
academic affairs, concerning the recent 
partnership agreement between the Col- 
lege and Lock Haven University. 

Of that inter-institutional commit- 
tee. College representatives wiD be Dr. 
James P. Rice, associate dean of educa- 
tional advancement. Dr. Daniel J. 
Doyle, integrated studies division direc- 
tor; Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, professor 
of English and chairperson. College 
Council; Dr. Donald B. Bergerstock, 
director of business and computer 
technologies, and Dr. Middleton. 

"To my knowledge. Lock Haven 
has not yet established its committee 
members," Dr. Middleton stated. 

Although there has only been 
preUmjnary discussion concerning what 
kinds of courses will be available. Dr. 
Middleton said that the primary areas 
seem to be Uberal arts, advanced 



business courses and some advanced 
work in computer sciences. 

"The key areas are those which 
would be compUmentary to our pro- 
grams, but not competitive," he said. 

He explained that recently Lock 
Haven University officials surveyed 
former community college graduates to 
determine where the highest interest lies. 

The intercollegiate committee will 
examine those results, and also look at 
what programs or courses would in- 
crease enroUment, he added. 

"This partnership is very student- 
oriented; we're interested in doing what 
we can to maximize opportunities for 
students," Dr. Middleton stated. 

He added, "We will utilize the 
strengths of both institutions to ac- 
complish this goal, but we will not com- 
pete with each other. There «nll be some 
faculty exchange, but the exact manner 
in which coursework will be offered has 
not yet been finaUzed. 



SGA executive Early Warning 
officers elected seminars continue 



New and returning senators for the 
Student Government Association elected 
officers for the current academic term 
during last week's senate meeting, ac- 
cording to Ms. Sandra Rhone, SGA ad- 
viser. 

The new officers are William J. 
Fritz, a plumbing and heating student 
from Homer City, SGA president; 
Maria L Herold, general studies, Selin- 
sgrove, vice-president; Kathy L. Cobb, 
individual studies, Williamsport, 
treasurer; Joshua J. Burke, graphic arts, 
York, parliamentarian/student action 
officer; and Lynee K. Wasson, business 
management. Pine Grove Mills, student 
awareness/communications officer. 

During the meeting, the group also 
discussed the nominations/elections pro- 
cedure it will use in determining the two 
SGA representatives to the College 
Council, of the Internal Governance 
System. 

According to Ms. Rhone, the 
group elected to remain within the 
parameters of the SGA executive of- 
ficers, senators and committee chairper- 
sons. Formal nominations and elections 
will be held tomorrow at 5 p.m., during 
the SGA senate meeting. 

■■■ Please him lo Page 2 



The Advisement and Career Ser- 
vices will offer Study Skills Seminars to- 
day, and tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 30, 
in Room 155, LRC, ft-om 4:30 to 5:30 
p.m., according to Lawrence W. Emery 
Jr., director of advisement and career 
services. 

Emery said, Ubrary research skills 
seminars will be held tomonow and 
Thursday, Oct. 2, from 4:30 to 5:30 
p.m., room 155, LRC. 

Faculty should refer students to 
report to the College library circulation 
desk to sign up. 

The seminars are being offered in 
conjunction with the recent distribution 
of Early Warning Cards, to assist 
students suffering from academic dif- 
ficulty so that they may prepare for 
mid-term exams, Emery stated. 

Deadline Oct. 3 

for December graduates 

Friday, Oct. 3, is the deadlme for 
December graduates to file petitions for 
graduation. 

The petitions must be filed at the 
Student Records Window in the 
Academic Center. 

Diplomas ordered after Oct. 3 will 
require a $10 late charge payment. 




Dr. Robert L. Brender, College praident, and Dr. Cnlg Dein Willis, 
prt«iden( of Lock Haven Univerdty, wev lymboUc gifts of intercollegiate 
iweitaUrti during i pren conference held Sep). 17. 



Students given tuition subsidies 



The following students were 
selected as the recipients of company 
tuition subsidies, according to Donald 
S. Shade, director of financial aid. 

Labels by Pulizzi, Williamsport, 
has donated $2424 a year for two years, 
a total of {4848. Recipients are 
Christopher A. Noble, computer infor- 
mation systems, Williamsport; Stephen 
R. Shaffer, diesel technology, 
WiUiamsport; and Patricia R. Eagleson, 
accounting, Montoursville. 

Lamco Communication, 
Williamsport, has donated $500 a year 
for 3 years, a total of $1500. The reci- 
pient is Theresa M. Ronen, broad- 
casting, Montoursville. 

Presto Print, WiUiamsport, has 
donated $500 a year for 3 years, for a 
total of $1500. The recipient is Richard 

Fire College 
this weekend 

Fire College Weekend, an annual 
two-day training session for area 
firefighters, will be held this Saturday 
and Sunday, Oct. 4 and 5 at the College 
and other locations throughout the 
community. 

According to Mrs. Barbara A. 
Danko, director of Lifelong Education, 
900 firefighters have registered for the 
event and at least 100 more are ex- 
pected. 

Fire College Weekend is sponsored 
by the Central Area Fire Chiefs' 
Association, the College, and the 
Lycoming County Department of 
Emergency Services. 



C. Holsinger, graphic arts, Muncy. 

Litton Electron Devices Division, 
Loyalsock, has donated $5000 a year 
for 3 years, a total of $15,000. Reci- 
pients are six electronics students: Bret 
M. Bitler, Muncy; Stephen E. Casson, 
WiUiamsport; Bruce J. Curtis, Jersey 
Shore; WUUam R. Marks, Jersey Shore; 
Brett A. White, WiUiamsport; and 
David J. Yoder, Linden. 

Shade said a $50,000 scholarship 
fimd has been estabUshed by die 
WeUsboro Area School District to aid 
its residents attendmg either the Main 
Campus or the North Campus. 

For fiuther information, interested 
WeUsboro residents may contact the 
School District Administrative Office at 
2 Charles Street, WeUsboro. 

Library joins 
delivery service 

The CoUege Library and the media 
Center have recently joined the In- 
terlibrary DeUvery Service (IDS), accor- 
ding to Mrs. Kate D. Hickey, director 
of learning resources. 

Mrs. Hickey said, "This is a 
delivery service between Ubraries 
throughout Pennsylvania, supported by 
individual membership fees and the 
State Library of Pennsylvania." 

"This service will enable the 
Library to obtain library materials for 
students and films for faculty more 
quickly and economicaUy than in the 
past," she said. 



iDSPOTUGHTaMradi;, 8«pl. », IMt 



SGA 



CoiUiniudfrom Page /■■■ 

Executive officers meet tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Sept. 30 at 4 p.m. Senators 
and chairpersons attend the S p.m. 
meeting, immediately following the ex- 
ecutive meeting. The senate meeting is 
open to the pubUc. 

Ms. Rhone said, "It is important 
that all officers, senators and committee 
chairpersons attend tomorrow. Photos 
will be taken for an up coming issue of 
the SPOTLIGHT." 



The SPOTLIGHT stqff ex- 
presses deepest sympathy to 
Anthony N. Cilia, 
SPOTLIGHT adviser, and 
Jerry Cillo, Cillo's College 
Corner, in the loss of their 
sister, Sally. 



Voter registration 
today in LEG 

The League of Women Voters will 
register potential voters It a.m. to 2 
p.m. today in the lobby of the Sus- 
quehanna Room, LEC, according to 
Ms. Sandra L. Rhone, SGA adviser. 

Individuals who have never 
registered, and who will be 18 on or 
before Nov. 4 are invited to register, 
Ms. Rhone said. 

Others who have moved, have 
changed their names, or have not voted 
in two years should re-register she said. 

The event is being sponsored by the 
Student Government Association. 



PROJECT REENTRY 

A Comprehensive 
LIFE/CAREER 

Planning Program 
for anyone without a 
high school diploma 

*Find out how to obtain your GED 
'Receive Career Counseling 
»Leam job readiness skills 

Interested... 

Call 
PROJEa REENTRY 

at 

326-3761, ext. 7450 

or visit the office in the 

Automotive Technology Center 

Classroom 147 



Action Committee 
needs YOU 

The purpose of the Student Action 
Committee is to hunt down and in- 
vestigate various problems students are 
experiencing with the College, according 
to Janice E. Appleton, conunittee 
chairperson and secretarial student from 
Towanda. 

Miss Appleton said suggestions, 
concerns and ideas with possible resolu- 
tions are the tifeblood of the committee. 
If you are a concerned student and 
would Uke to seriously contribute to the 
committee, please contact Miss Ap- 
pleton at the Student Action Line, Ex- 
tension 7248, or Ms. Sandra Rhone, 
Extension 4763, or stop by the Student 
Government office, A138, Lifelong 
Education Center, and leave your name 
and number. 

Health applications 
to be reviewed 

All students enrolled in the in- 
dividual studies or general studies pro- 
grams, interested in health programs for 
the Fall 1987 semester, may contact the 
College Admissions office to make sure 
that their applications are in order so 
that they may be processed, according 
to Ms. Davie Jane Nestarick, health 
sciences division director. 

Ms. Nestarick siud the programs 
include dental hygiene, dental assisting, 
oaupational therapy assistant, practical 
nursing, radiography and surgical 
technology. 



It's Peanuts for mel 

A Dog it Man's best 
friend... And SNOOPY 
is a dog... whether 
he believes it or not! 



SPOTLiaHT 
Monday, S«pL 2t, ItK ■ Vol. 22, No. a 

The SPOTUQHT la published each Monday morning o( the academic year, ex- 
cept (or Cotlege vacattona. by journalism end other Intereated students of The 
Wllllamsport Area Community College 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1006 W Third St., VKIIIIamsporl. Pa- 
17701 Telephone: {7171 326-3761 . Extension 7533. 



collegiate crossword 

i 




12 Deal out 

13 Opposite of syn. 
18 Tennis strokes 
21 College events 



I of ex. 



17 tele 

19 Type of fish 

20 Simultaneously 
(4 wds.) 

22 Prison place 

23 Departure 

24 Barber shop item 
27 Technique develo 

t>y Freud 

31 Sorrow 

32 Blackjack conman 
(2 wds.) 

33 Chemical suffix 

34 Beverly Sills' 

35 Houses in Sevill 

36 Oash 

37 Author's outputs 
(abl)r.) 

38 Musical maneuver 



45 remark 

50 Shinbone 

51 Having no more 
space (3 wds. ) 

53 Distribute 

54 No, in Nuremberg 

55 Aware of 

56 Orchestra section 

57 Head inventory 

58 Mae 



9 Antagoni: 

10 Antagoni: 

11 Per 



24 



Act 



25 Concise 

26 Poker bet 

27 Path 

28 Word said during a 

29 Together (2 wds.) 

30 Conmon 

32 Piece of precipi- 



38 Warnings of troubl 

39 Recurrent theme 

41 Sentence part 

42 Orchestra leaders 

44 Fasten again 

45 Accumulation 

46 Competent 

47 Mr. Long 



49 Plenty 

50 Seaman 
52 Bon 



This Week's Puzzle Brought to You By 

Dennis Buck Hairstyling 

325WalnalSt. • WilUmuport • Phone 326-3608 



Opinions expressed are those of the student newspaper or of those whose 
mes accompany Items Opinlona do not reflect official opinion of the Institution, 



STAFF THIS ISSUE 
Kithy L. Cobb, Brenda M. VIbert, Lisa R. Lumbard, Ruth Ann Hlison, Todd A. 
Egger, Michael Waldion, Angela SIpe, Mary E. Walter, Margaret M. OINardo, 
and Donna L Trimble. 

Anthony N. Clllo, contributing adviser. 



\^S~«^-SS5,-S«.«- 



BARRY'S 

BROOKLYN STYLE 
EATERY 




I 
ROOMS FOR RENT 

"Save-A-Buck Specials 

Open 'TO 11 P.M. Daily 



New York City 
bus reservations 
still being taken 

Reservations are still being taken 
for two bus trips scheduled to go to New 
York aty, on Saturdays, Dec. 6 and 
13, aaording to Ms. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

"There are more seats available on 
the trip scheduled," she commented. 

Tickets are $20 for students, facul- 
ty, staff and alumni of the College, and 
$22 for the public. 

Reservations may be made by call- 
ing College Ext. 7269 or visiting Ms. 
Fremiotti's office on the first floor of 
the gym. 

Ms. Fremiotti emphasized that 
students, faculty and staff are entitled to 
one reduced price per ID. All other 
must pay the price of public tickets, 
even if they are accompanying someone 
from the College. 

Crop Walk 
scheduled 
to help 
world hunger 

A Crop Walk is scheduled for Sun- 
day, Oct. 19, according to Ms. JoAnn 
R. Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

The walk, which will begin at 1:30 
p.m. at Memorial Park, will benefit 
world hunger. 

Ms. Fremiotti said 20 percent of 
the proceeds go to the Williamsport 
area. 

Interested students, faculty, and 
staff are encouraged to participate by 
volunteering to walk, or by sponsoring 
another walker, she said. 

Interested persons can sign up to 
walk three, six, or 10 miles. The benefit 
will also include bike routes. 

For more information, contact Ms. 
Sandra Rhone, College activities assis- 
tant, at Extension 4763. 

Ms. Rhone's office is located in the 
Recreation Center in the Lifelong 
Education Center. 



Cast announced 
for Miller play 

The WilUamsport Players recently 
announced the cast of their opening 
play for the 1986-87 season, Jason 
Miller's PuUtzer Prize-winning story of 
a group of former basketball stars of a 
championship team from a Scranton 
High School. 

The acclaimed That Championship 
Season was also the winner of the New 
York Drama Critic's Circle Award and 
a Tony Award. 

According to mrs. Jo Ann R. 
Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator, the production will star Ernest 
Giglio as the Coach; Charles M. Knight 
as George Sikowski; David B. Person as 
James Daley; Jerry Neece as Tom 
Daley; and Frank Fedele as Phil 
Romano. 

Mrs. Fremiotti said the play will be 
staged in the College Academic Center 
Auditorium on Oct. 17, 18, 19, 24 and 
25. 

The production will be directed by 
Frank Fedele. 

Tickets are available for either in- 
dividual performances, or for the entire 
season. They can be obtained at the 
College activities office, room 108, 
Gymnasium, or at Otto's Bookstore, or 
the West Branch Racquet Club. 

Movie tickets available 
in College Bookstore 

UA movies tickets may be purchas- 
ed at the Bookstore during regular 
bookstore hours ~ 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
aaording to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
College activities coordinator. 

UA tickets may be used at any 
theatre and cost $2.30. The Student 
Government Association sponsors the 
ticket sales. 




'.> 



SPOTUGHTDMoidi}, Scpl. 1% in(a3 







Nurse's hours 

The Student Health Serrlcea 
Office, hi Room 104, Gym- 
nulnm, ii open from 8 to 3:30 
p.m. daOy Monday throogh Fri- 
day. 

Mn. Juet R. Qnerlmlt, t 
rtgbtered narae, U ivtlkble to 
care for minor Ulnetaes ud in- 
Juies u weD at refemli. 



p H ■■ I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ w 

rFREE PlIIAll 

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Buy 2iny size Little Caesars 
Original round pizza at regular 
price, get the identicaJ pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 




W.A.C.C. StDdCDU UTC 

•ddilloiiil 10% oal; with 
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One coupon per customer. Cany out only At participating locations. 



Lut week's blood presrare clinic wu located In three places: the front 
lobby of the ACC building. In front of the library, LRC, and hi Room B107, 
LEG. Practical nnrsing itndenis did the screening last Tuesday and 
Wednesday. 

Recreation Center hours listed 

The College Rec Center will be open this week 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday, and 7 a.m. to S p.m. on Friday, according to Ms. Sandra 
Rhone, College activities assistant. 

Weekend hours will be 11 a.m. to S p.m., Saturday and Sunday. 

Ms. Rhone said she is urging all students to respect Rec Room rules and 
regulations. 

Vitamin C... A Wonder Drug? 

Vitamin C has been greatly pubUcized as a "wonder drug" capable of cur- 
ing everything from the common cold to cancer. However, what sounds "too 
good to be true" may be exactly that. 

According to Mrs. Janet R. Querimit, College nurse, vitamin C stengthens 
blood vessels, speeds wound healing and enhances the body's absorption of 
dietary iron. It also increases the body's resistance to foreign bodies and 
bacterial infections. 

However, Mrs. Querimit said, most nutritionists don't beUeve that large 
doses of vitamin C are effective in decreasing the incidence, severity or life span 
of the common cold and related viral infections. 

She stated that although it's easy to obtain enough vitamin C through a 
balanced diet and without vitamin supplements, it's most important that the 
benefits of vitamin C can be derived f^om only 60 mg a day. 

The normal, healthy athlete needs only 60 mg of vitamin C daily, Mrs. 
Querimit emphasized. "Extra amounts of this essential nutrient are not absorb- 
ed or used by the body's tissues and are eliminated m the urine. In other words, 
megadoses don't result in mega-benefits," she said. 

Transfer seminars 
set for next week 

Transfer seminars will be held next 
Monday. Oct. 6, at 1 p.m., and next 
Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 11 a.m., in the 
Academic Center Auditorium, in 
preparation for College transfer Day, 
Monday, Oct. 13, according to Thomas 
C. Shoff, transfer counselor. 

Each seminar will last 30 minutes 
with time available for students to ask 
questions, Shoff said. 

Shoff urges students interested in 
an eventual transfer to attend one of the 
three seminars. 

He also stated that information 
pamphlets will be available. Any stu- 
dent having questions can contact him 
at ext. 7246, or room 157 m the Advise- 
ment and Career Services Center, Lear- 
ning Resource Center. 



Government Surplus 

Military Clothing 

and 

Equipment 

Appalachian Outfitters 

15 East Water Street 

Muncy, PA 17772 



Monday - 

Friday 

Saturday 



Thursday 



9-7 
9-9 
10-5 



Phone 717-546-8296 



4aSPOTUGHTaMouU;, Sept. 29, i:.: 
sSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSe 




**Our Key to the Pc 




Flower show held in 




The Duboistown Garden Club presented a standard flower show Sept. 12 
and 13 in Le Jeune Chef in the Lifelong Education Center, according to Mrs. 
Felix French, show chairperson. Exhibits were displayed in Le Jeune Chef as 
well as in the outer hallway. 

Some of the award winners included: Eleanor Hoyt, Mrs. Miriam Bower, 
the Tricolor Award; Mrs. Fehx French, the Creativity Award; Mrs. Linda Seely, 
Award of EHstinction; Mrs. Edna Schooley, the National Arboreal Award; Mrs. 
Gloria Shaw, Award of Horticulture Excellence. 

Mrs. Margaret Rickenbach, Mrs. Rosemarie De Pasquale, Boise P. Hall, 
the Award of Merit; Mrs. Diane Ertel, Robert Lesher, the National Educational 
Award. 

Pennsylvania award winners were Mrs. Dorothy Meeks, the Special 
Recognition Award; Mr. and Mrs. Austin G. Shaw, the Pennsylvania Educa- 
tional Award; Mrs. Edna Schooley, Judges Award for Best of Show. 

Mrs. Gladys Dapp, the Horticulture Award; Mrs. Felix French, the Staging 
Award. 






SPOTLIGHT 



story by Brenda M 



Photoi b: 



SPOTUGHTDMokUt, 8q.l. 2», IfMoS 



Past and Present** 



in Le Jeune Chef 






Student awards were Diane M. Bongiovi, floriculture student from 
Williamsport, and Phillip Steele, floriculture student from Shikellamy, First 
Place. 

Anne M. Bacon, floriculture student from Northern Tioga, and Elizabeth 
A. Call, floriculture student from Stroudsburg, Second Place. 

Valerie L. Peet, floriculture student from Montoursville, and Anne M. 
Bogaczyk, floriculture student from Southern Tioga, Third Place. 

Honorable Mentions were awarded to Karen M. Hartzell, Montgomery; 
Shelly M. Lowe, Covington; and Maria K. Mihalski, Nazareth. All are 
floriculture students. 





I M. Vibert 



Ds by Donna L. Trimble 




6DSP0TUGHTDMiMdV, StU. 19, Ittt 




Fitker Dm C. Koviiik, pulor of ihc Holy Crou Orlbodoi Church. 

Performing Artists Series 
debuts: 3 big shows set 

The College will present its first annual Performing Artists Series beginning 
Jan. 31, 1987, according to Mrs. JoAno R. Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

A Chorus Line, the Jerry Kravat Entertainment Production Touring Edi- 
tion, will be held Jan. 31 at 8 p.m. in the Scottish Rite Auditorium, downtown 
Williamsport. 

On Feb. 21, at 8 p.m., comedic entertainer Steve Landesberg will appear, 
also at the Scottish Rite Auditorium. 

Trumpeter Maynard Ferguson is scheduled to appear March 14 at 8 p.m. in 
the Scottish Rite Auditorium. Ferguson, best known for the theme to the movie. 
Rocky, will appear with his new touring band. High Voltage. 

According to Mrs. Fremiotti, season tickets, which includes admission to all 
three shows with varied seating, cost $30 for students, faculty and staff (seatinn 
in a non-reserved section); S35 for the pubUc (seating in a non-reserved section); 
and MO patron (reserved seating, and name included in the programs for all per- 
formances). 

Mrs. Fremiotti pointed out that the reduced price for students, faculty and 
staff is Umited to one reduced price per individual. 

Season tickets are available at the College Activities Office, Room 108, 
Gymnasium. Students, faculty and staff wishing to receive the reduced price 
must buy tickets through that office, Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

She added that College employees who would hke to purchase tickets under 
the payroll reduction plan must obtain them through the same office. 

Bloodmobile here in October 

A Bloodmobile visit sponsored by the Student Government Association will 
be made at the College in October, according to Ms. Sandra Rhone, SGA ad- 
viser. 

The Bloodmobile will be at the Earth Science Center on Oct. 16, and on 
Main Campus on Oct. 21 and 22. 

A goal of 450 pints has been set. 



Orthodox Church 
encourages attendance 

by Brenda M. VIbcrt, of the SPOTLIGHT ilaff 

"Being orthodox means being part of the faith community - worshipping, 
praying, and singing together, and serving one another," aaording to a pam- 
phlet titled "About Being Orthodox," supplied by the Holy Cross Orthodox 
Church, 1725 Blair St., Williamsport. 

"The Orthodox Church offers the most meaningful and rich expression of 
faith and worship there is," according to Father Dan C. Kovalak, pastor of the 
Holy Cross Orthodox Church. 

The word Orthodox Church comes from the Greek othos - correct and 
doxa - teaching (form Dokien, to think), or worship (from Doxa, meaning 
glory). 

According to Father Kovalak, the Orthodox Church is a woridwide com- 
munity of christian people (there are five million members in the United States) 
who believe in Jesus Christ as God and in the Church he established. 

Father Kovalak mentioned, "Our services are all in English and we 
recognize the seven sacraments." 

A pamphlet titled "What is the Orthodox Church?" says that some of the 
characteristics of the Orthodox Church are: The church is One, because our 
Lord, founded only One Church. It is Holy through the sanctification of her 
founder and head. Jesus Christ, and the operation of the Holy Spirit. It is 
CathoUc, because it is universal and knows no Umitations of time or place. It is 
ApostoUc, because it was founded by the Holy Apostles and their teachings. The 
Orthodox Church beheves in the universal resurrection of the dead. It teaches, 
that all of mankind will be Judged at the awesome Second Coming of Lord, 
Jesus Christ." 

Sunday service at the Holy Cross Orthodox Church is held at 1 1 a.m., with 
a prepatory vesper service (telling through worship - a dramatic presentation on 
creation), on Saturday evenings at 6:30 p.m. 

Father Kovalak stated, "It is not our intention to judge. Our doors are open 
to everyone in the community who wants to live a Christian life, and make the ' 
worid a little better place to live in." 



Alcoholics hotline 
ready for callers 

There is help for alcoholics from 
Dial-a-Sober-Thought, sponsored by 
the Gateway Rehabilitation Center in 
Pittsburgh, according to Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit, College nurse. 

A new thought is recorded daily to 
aid alcohoUcs in their recovery process. 
The phone number for Pennsylvania 
residents is 1-800-437-6237. 

Those outside of Pennsylvania may 
call 1-800457-6237. 

Bookstore offers 
discount on tools 

The College Bookstore has an 
overstock of electrician's high quality 
tools. These are priced to meet competi- 
tion with an additional 10 percent off 
through Tuesday, Sept. 30, according to 
Mrs. Eleonore R. Holcomb, superviser 
of the College Bookstore. 

CroMword Answen 



Gwfield is O.K. 
Any cat that likes 
PIZZA can't Iw aU bad! 




Cillo's 

College 

Comer 

PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Third SI. 

(Next to 

the Academic Center) 

THIS WEEK'S 
SPECIALS 



Turkey and Cheese Half Sub $1.55 
Whole Sub $2.95 Reg. $1.85 
Reg. $3.25 tax incid 

Egg on Muffin 
$.60 

tax incId 
Reg. $.80 

HOURS* 

Mod. thru Thurs. 

7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 




Week of Monday, Sept. 29 through Sunday, Oct. 5 

MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega Fellowship - 7 to 9 p.m., 
tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 30, Room 133, 
Academic Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau - noon to 1 p.m., 
tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept, 30, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous - 7 p.m., Wednesday, 
Oct. 1, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Forestry Club, Woodsman Meet - All day, 
Sunday Oct. 5, at WheeUng, West Virginia. 

Student Government Association -executive 
meeting, tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 30, 4 to 5 p.m., 
Room B107, Lifelong Education Center; open to 
executive ofBcers only. 

Student Govenunent Association - Senate 
meeting, tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 30, from 5 to 6 
p.m., Room BI07, Lifelong Education Center;open 
to all students and staff. 

EVENTS 

Raffle - There will be a Forestry Club raffle, 
at the Earth Sciences Center, today, Monday, Sept. 
29. 

Movie ~ The film society will present "Three 
Brothers", on Thursday , Oct. 9, and Friday, Oct. 
10, from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. at the Academic Center 
Auditorium. 

Bus Trip - Baltimore Inner Harbor Bus Trip, 
7 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 4. Contact College 
Activities Office in Gym. 




ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIGHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Snacks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 








BENSON 



"Project Reentry" 
financed through 
June 1987 

by Kathv L Cobb, of the 
SPOTUGHT stqff. 

"Project Reentry," a comprehen- 
sive life/career planning program for 
anyone without a high school diploma, 
has been financed by a $41,926 grant, 
aaording to Ms. Nancy C. Beightol, 
grant coordinator. 

"Project Reentry" provides infor- 
mation on GED testing, career counsel- 
ing, and job readiness skills, Ms. 
Beightol said. 

She added that project services are 
offered at no charge to participants. 

Persons who participate will also 
be encouraged to enroll in adult basic 
education courses, the GED program 
and/or vocational training. 

Ms. Beightol stated, "We are con- 
cerned with the multi-needs of the adult 
learner... we will encourage the pursuit 
of equivalency diploma or vocational 
training." 

Students who are cunently enrolled 
at the College but have no high school 
diploma may quaUfy for the program if 
they have successfully completed 30 
credit hours, Ms. Beightol said. 

"We will assist students who meet 
that criteria in completing Pennsylvania 
education forms which would enable 
them to obtain an equivalency 
diploma," she said. 

Participants will first be interview- 
ed, to assess individual needs, and to be 
matched up with other services available 
in the coimnunity. 

Ms. Beightol will also administer 
the ofBcial GED practice test, which will 
show the participant his or her strengths 
and weaknesses. 

Ms. Beightol said, "Administering 
the test will permit us to predict the final 
test score within five points, and will 
allow the participant to approach the 
actual test with confidence." 

Ms. Beightol will be assisted by 
Joan M. Staver, a human services stu- 
dent from Williamsport. 

"Project Reentry" offers services 
in Lycoming County (at the College), at 
the North Campus in Tioga County, 
and at the Towanda PubUc Library in 
Bradford and Sullivan Counties. 

Ms. Beightol said the project may 
also assist inmates of the Bradford 
County Prison in Towanda, and 
"possibly the Lycoming County Prison 
in Williamsport." 

"Project Reentry" will serve ap- 
proximately 120 individuals, she said. 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. ^ 



BOW, QUIVER FOR SALE 
45- to iS-poand componnd bow 

with qoiver. Preciiion brand. 

Cimonflaged. $55.00. 322-«819 after 5 

p.m. [advt.l 

LOSTI Scientific calculator in a 
black case. If found please return to 
Computer Lab, third floor, ACC, or 
call Larry at 435-0959. 



SPOTUGHTDMoida;, Sept. 2«, IfUO? 

Cultural Society 
to meet Thursday 

Students are cordially invited to at- 
tend the first meeting of the Multi- 
Cultural Society, 3:30 p.m. (his Thurs- 
day, Oct. 2 in room 151 of the Learning 
Resources Center, according to Mrs. Jo 
Ann R. Fremiotti, College activities 
coordmator. 

"This organization was formed two 
years ago on campus to advocate ser- 
vices for non-traditional and minority 
students, and provide for them a net- 
work of information and resources," 
Mrs. Fremiotti said. 

She added, "We hope to encourage 
student participation this year, and to 
plan many cultural and social events 
within the community." 

Mrs. Calvetta A. Walker, instruc- 
tional specialist, and Mrs. Maryann R. 
Lampman, instructor of reading, will 
serve as co-advisers to the organization. 

Refreshments will be served. 



Student i 
Housing 



SINGLE 
ROOMS 

924 W. Third St. 

A Block from Campus 

and 

957 Vine Avenue 

Around the Corner 



I calCn 

|326-6536 



r^ 



SoSPOIUGBTaMonli;, Sept. 1% IMt 



il 




Stadenti btlUe (or poueilon of bukctbiU u II leivei bukel during league 
pit; lut week. 



PBL holds first meeting 

Phi Beta Lambda held its first meeting of the semester last Tuesday, Sept. 
23. The meeting was conducted by Paul W. Ooldfeder, PBL state adviser, and 
assistant professor, business administration. 

The group discussed plans for this semester's activities, which include 
assisting the Salvation Army with bell ringing at Christmas; manning the 
Christmas tree at the Lycoming Mall for the Lycoming County Health and Lung 
Association; and assisting the Red Cross with campus Bloodmobiles. 

Aaording to Susan R. Kallansrud, PBL secretary, and journalism student 
from WiUiamsport, there will be a fall workshop hosted at Bloomsburg Universi- 
ty, this Saturday, Oct. 4. The day wiU be highUghted by a State Office reception 
and dance. Registration is at 9 a.m. 

Mrs. Kallansrud said that the National Fall Leadership Conference for the 
Eastern Region will be held in Syracuse, New York, on Friday, Oct. 31, and 
Saturday and Sunday, Nov. I and 2. Students from 12 Eastern states will par- 
ticipate. Registration is $34 per person. 

The next Phi Beta Lambda meeting is scheduled to be held pext Tuesday, 
Oct. 7 at 3:30 p.m. in room 329, in the Academic Center. 

PBL dues are JI2 for the year, payable at the PBL office, room 3, lower 
level of the Academic Center. 

'Let's get serious' says adviser: 
Is it Garfield or is it Peanuts? 

"Let's get serious," muttered Anthony N. Cillo, faculty adviser to The 
SPOTLIGHT last week after the student newspaper's weekly staff meeting. 

"We've got to get this thing going... Do they want 'Garfield' or do they 
want 'Peanuts'? 

Eyeballing the staff ~ most of whom were remaining undeclared and most 
of whom arc knowledgeable of the adviser's penchant for cats - he declared: 
"Make it democratic. Appoint a committee." 

...And so... The Great Garfield vs. Peanuts Debate begins... 

For whom will you vote? Garfield? Peanuts? 

SPOTLIGHT readers soon will determine which of the popular comie strips 
will be carried In the weekly newspaper. 



SportsCard 



Todiy: 

Basketball, flag football, and volleyball 
leagues.. .4 to 10 p.m. in the gym. 

Weight Room open.. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Karate class...? to 9 p.m. in the gym. 
Tomorrow, Sept. 30: 

Open Gym.. .4 to 10 p.m., leagues will be in 
play. 
Wednesday, Del. 2: 

Leagues in play. ..4 to 10 p.m. 

Weight Room open. ..Open Gym. 
Thnnday, Oct. 3: 

Leagues in play.. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Weight Room open. ..Open Gym. 

Karate class...? to 9 p.m. in the gym. 
Sunday, Oct. 6: 

Weight Room open. ..Open Gym, 5 to 9 p.m., 
Volleyball, basketball, and any other activity for 
which equipment is available. 

Anyone interested in participating in a raquet 
ball tournament should see Ms. Margot R. Bayer, 
evening activities assistant, in the Gym, Room 209, 
or call Extension ?416 after 1:30 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday. 



■K ••*•*************••••• M. 




* 






¥ 


¥ 




The 


¥ 


¥ 

¥ 


WiLLIAJ 


dSPORT Area Community College 


¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 


FIRST ANNUAL 


¥ 






¥ 


¥ 




^->i 


¥ 


¥ 

¥ 




Calendar^ 


¥ 
¥ 


¥ 




^ jujp^^ 


¥ 


¥ 




w^m.'ilr 


¥ 


¥ 




M/Wf 


¥ 


¥ 




UMmt 


¥ 


¥ 




^Wf tl 


¥ 


¥ 

¥ 




Contest 


¥ 
¥ 


¥ 






¥ 


¥ 






¥ 


¥ 


Attention 


artists! 


¥ 


¥ 


The Colic 
community, 


e is sponsoring a calendar an contest to be open to all members of the College 


¥ 


¥ 


We are searching for an original pen-and-ink drawing from among our sludenu, faculty. | 


<K 


¥ 


and staff. The 
calendar. 


winning entry will receive both prize money and publication credit in our 19S7 


¥ 


¥ 






¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 


¥ 
¥ 


GRAND PRIZE $100 


¥ 


You need 


not be an established artist or have a particular "style". All that is required is an 


^ 


ability to draw neatly and accurately in pen and ink, | 


¥ 


¥ 


This year 


subject is The Academic Center 


Deadline 


or entries is November 3. 1986. 


¥ 


¥ 
¥ 


This is a juned competition and certain restncuons apply. For a complete description and a | 


¥ 


list of rales, vi 


It the College Information Office on the second floor of the Lifelong Education 


Center, 




■^ 


¥ 


Good Luck! 1 


¥ 


¥ 




1 


¥ 



¥ ••••••••••••••••••***-^^ 




Vote Today 
For Garfield or Peanuts 

. See Pages 4 & 5 
Your Vote Benefits Literacy Council 



FirehoDM dog itopped to give hb Mcret vote for either Snoopy or Gtr- 
fleld. On truth, Lee Shipe, i flremu with the Old Lycoming Townahip 
Firehonte, donned the Dalmttlu coitnme to entertain Fire College Weekend 
pirtklpinU. Shlpe told SPOTLIGHT maniging editor Kithy L. Cobb thit If 
hb fIrehonM pnrchuei the coitnme ~ whkh coiti $500 - it would be nied 
dnring open houe, In pindei, and to Tidt the pedlitrici dcpvtmentt In the 
local hoipltab.) (SPOTLIGHT photo by Donna L. Trimblel 




SPOTLIGHT 

Moidir, Oct. 13, 1«M • Vol. 22, No. I • I Papi 
WUUuuport Aftt CoBBiilt; CoOete • WDUmiKirt, Pi. 177(1 



g^"*!!"" 

^ ^ 




500 twirl and spin 

at first dance of the year 



By Ruth Ann Htxion 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Approximately 500 persons attend- 
ed the Student Government Association 
(SGA) dance lield in tlie Susquehanna 
Room last Wednesday, according to 
SGA treasurer Kathy L. Cobb, in- 
dividual studies student from 
Williamsport. 



Ms. Cobb said, "Everyone had a 
rowdy, raucous, foot-stomping, good 
ol' time.. .the floor was shaldng." 

The dance was deejayed by the 
College radio station, WWAS, with 
equipment from local radio station 
WFXX. 

Ms. Cobb termed the dance "a 
success." 



1,000 take part in fire training 

Approximately 1,000 persons, in- Sunday, Oct. 5 at various campus and 
eluding students, staff and instructors, community locations, 
attended Fire College Weekend held One of the highlights of the 
Oct. 4 and 5, according to Chief weekend was a shde presentation Satur- 
WiUiam G. Hayes, president. Central day evening at the Loyalsock Township 
Area Fire Chiefs' Association. Volunteer Fire Company, 701 Nor- 

Hayes said students attended thway Road, WiUiamsport. 
classroom instruction on Saturday, Oct. The slide show, presented by War- 
4, and gained hands-on experience on 

In Pnmp Opcratlou, the firemen were initnicted hi the correct method to 
attack hoics to tOI the fire tracki wltk water. (SPOTUGHT pkoto by Donna 
L. Titablel 

Umm Pteost mm to Page 4 



2d8POTUGHTDMoiJit, Oct. », 1W« 



Le 



ITERS TO SPOTLIGHT JXEADERS 



Re; 



Thank you! 

I wish to thank all of the people In- 
cluding faculty and students for aiding 
Michael after his accident on Friday, 
Oct. 3. 

That was very kind of you and I 
really appreciate It. Thanks again. 

iHbal Wtldron 
of Muney 

Waldron was Involved In an 
pedestrlan<ar accident on West Tfiird 
Street In front ot the Academic Center. 
He was not Injured. Ed. 



Lewisburg Rotary Club praises 
machine and welding classes 

[This Is a transcription ot a letter sent to Paul S. Shrlner, associate pro- 
lessor ol welding, and Lawrence Graczyk, machine shop Instructor. It Is 
published for SPOTLIGHT readers at their request. Ed J , 

The Lewisburg Rotary Club wishes to connmend you for your community 
spirit In making our project a success. It Is with the deepest appreciation of you 
and your [students] that I am writing this letter. 

When at the time things were looking very bleak, vou came to our rescue. 

We needed pig roasters very badly for a community project and through 
you and your classes the efforts will show for many years. The roasters were 
fabricated at W.A. C. C. with most of your Ideas Incorporated Into the design. 

The work was done expeditiously and satisfactorily In all respects. 

Once again, I want to thank you personally and wish you the best In all of 
your future endeavors. 

William P. Mitray, Chairman 
Jeffrey Trceia, Praildtnt 
Rotary Club of Lawliburg 



Human Service 
Club thanks 
supporters 

Report by 

Maria C. Caaala, 

HSR mambar/raportar 

The Human Service Club Is thank- 
ing all those who supported the 
group's bake sale on Sept. 26. 

It was a huge success. The profits 
will be used to hold various activities In 
the future. 

It's never too late to Join the club. 
We need you because others need us. 
Come and Join our family. 

Reminder: Dues are due by today, 
Monday, Oct. 1 3. 

Thanks agalnl 



Four attend 

literacy 

workshop 



Four persons from the College at- 
tended a tutor training session spon- 
sored by tlie Lycoming County Literacy 
Project on Oct. 3 and 4, aaording to 
Mrs. Nancy C. fieigbtol, Project Reen- 
try coordinator. 

The workshop, which was held at 
the James V. Brown Library in 
Williamsport, was attended by Carl M. 
Hillyard, instructor of carpentry, Ms. 
Beightol and two students. 

Marcia A. Knott, a general studies 
student from Williamsport, and Karen 
L. Simpkins, a dental hygiene student 
from Quakerstown, attended. 

"The focus of the workhop was to 
teach us how to teach an illiterate adult 
to read," Ms. Beightol said. 



She added that the method used in 
teaching illiterate adults to read is the 
Laubach method, which was developed 
by Dr. Frank C. Laubach of Benton, 
Pa., around 1930. 

The Laubach method involves the 
use of four skill books and a phonic- 
based approach. 

"The method is so successful 
because 88 percent of words in the 
English langauge can be sounded out," 
Ms. Beightol stated. 

Those who attended the worbhop 
received certification to instruct with 
this method and will be matched one- 
on-one with an illiterate adult from this 
area. 



The workshop was conducted by 
Ms. Daryl Way-Bbder, tutor/trainer for 
the Lycoming County Literacy Project. 

The Literacy Project is located in 
the James V. Brown Library, 19 E. 
Fourth St., downtown Williamsport. 

"The project operates, for the most 
part, on a volunteer basis. Anyone in- 
terested in contributing at least one hour 
per week and their ability to read can 
contact the project through the Brown 
Library or through me," Ms. Beightol 
said. 

Interested persons can reach the 
Brown Library at 326-0536. 

Ms. Bei^tol is located in Room 
147, Automotive Trades Center. She 
may be contacted by phone at College 
Ext. 7450. 



Transfer Day today 



Transfer Day will be held between 1 and 3 p.m. today in the Gym, according 
to Thomas C. Shoff, transfer counselor. 

"Students interested in transfer are encouraged to attend," Shoff said. 

This evening, then, College Night for high school students will be held in the 
Gym. 

The evening program is a program directed toward high school students going 
into college on the freshman level, whereas Transfer J)ay is directed toward college 
students planning to transfer to another college program, Shoff stated. 



SPOTUaHT 
Mondly, Oct. 1$, laat - Vol. 22, No. S 

The SPOTLIGHT is' published each Monday morning ot the academic year, ex- 
cept for Coiiege vacations, by journalism and other Interested students of The 
Williamsport Area Community College. 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W, Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 
1 7701 . Telephone: (717) 326-3761 , Extension 7221 



CO 



o 
6% 
< tr 




STEPHENKING'S "^^^ 




■p'-Ty^'iYJ^jr, ;t''- ^■'"^'^- 



Multi-Cultural Society plans 
recruitment today, tomorrow 



SPOTUGHTDMoidir, Oct. 13, ItH a3 



Hospital conducts cocaine itfo night 



The Multi-Cultural Society held a 
meeting earlier this month and plans 
were announced for a recruitment drive, 
according to Mrs. Calvetta Walker, in- 
structional specialist. 

Mrs. Walker added that the 
recruitment drive will be held today and 
tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in 
front of the Susquehanna Room. 

She said the drive is to "recruit 
new members that are either non- 
traditional or minority students." 

No dues are charged to join the 
society. 

According to the Constitution of 
the Multi-Cultural Society, regular 
members shall consist of "any in- 
terested students, faculty, and staff of 
the College advocating concerns and 
needs of the non-traditional students to 
the College." 

Non-traditional students are defin- 
ed as students who meet one or more of 
the following: handicapped in a 
physical, economical, or educational 
sense, or a student with less than a full- 
time status. 

Mrs. Walker said that a "talent 
roster" was also discussed at the 
meeting. The roster is distributed an- 
nually by the College Board and is 
distributeid to four-year colleges and 
universities. 

Some schools use the talent roster 
to award scholarships to minority 



Movie tickets ayailable 
in College Boolcstore 

UA movies tickets may be purchas- 
ed at the Bookstore during regular 
bookstore hours - 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.j 
according to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
College activities coordinator. 

UA tickets may be used at any 
theatre and cost J2.50. The Student 
Government Association sponsors the 
ticket sales. 



BARRY'S 

BROOKLYN STYLE 
EATERY 




5g 
I 

ROOMS FOR RENT 
"Save-A-Buck Specials 
Open 'til midnit* dally 



students who plan to transfer to four- 
year institutions. To be eligible, 
students must have a cumulative grade- 
point average of 2.73, be scheduled to 
receive an associate degree, or have 
completed 60 credits by the end of the 
1986-87 academic year. 

Mrs. Walker said she is urging all 
eligible students to sign up for the talent 
roster and join the Multi-Cultural Socie- 
ty. 



The Muncy Valley Hospital held a 
cocaine information night at the Holi- 
day Inn, 1840 E. Third St., 
Williamsport, aaordmg to Mrs. Janet 
Querimit, College nurse. 

The meeting was held on Thurs- 
day, Sept. 23, and lasted for two hours. 

Principal speaker for the event was 
Dr. Bruce K. Branin, assistant medical 
director, Marmoth Medical Center, 
Waverly, Pa. 

Some of the facts on cocaine as 



Trustees meet, approve items 



The College Board of Trustees met 
last Monday, Oct. 6, in the College 
Board Room to discuss regular 
business, including the approval of bids 
for personal computer hardware and 
software. 

The personal computer hardware 
and software would equip four 
microcomputer laboratories in the new 
Advanced Technology and Health 
Sciences Center. The equipment would 
be used for practical experience for 
students and as open lab equipment. 

IBM was selected as the sole ven- 
dor for the equipment to insure com- 
patibility with existing equipment at the 
College. 

Total cost is $419,762.96, which 
will be drawn from five federal grants. 

The trustees also approved exten- 
ding appropriations for a number of 
purchase orders from the 1985-86 fiscal 
year, and various personnel items. 

In addition. Dr. WiUiam J. Martin, 
dean of student services, presented 
board chairperson Mrs. Kathryn W. 
Lumley, a Waterford Crystal "Kennedy 
Bowl" for the College in College presi- 
dent Dr. Robert L. Breuder's name. 

Dr. Martin presented the gift on 



behalf of the British Isles travel/study 
team, which consisted of numerous 
faculty, staff and administration. The 
group toured the British Isles during the 
summer months. 

The Waterford Bowl will be placed 
in the College's Professional Develop- 
ment Center, which is still under con- 
struction on Susquehanna Street. 

The Board of Trustees is next 
scheduled to meet at 8 p.m., Monday, 
November 3. 



presented by Mrs. Querimit are: 

Everyday, 3,000 to 7,000 people in 
the United Stated try cocaine for the 
first time. 

30 miUion people (15 percent of the 
U.S. population) have tried cocaine at 
least once. 

6 million people are regular 
users. (use the drug more than once a 
week) 

Three of five who abuse cocaine 
wiU become addicted. 

Cocaine is seven times as expensive 
as gold. 

Cocaine is a S50 to {60 biUion per 
year business (four times the sales of 
U.S. steel.) 

Americans spend $160 miUion per 
day for cocaine. 

Median age of abuser, 32 years 
old, earns between $15,000 and $50,000 
(88 percent are unemployed). 

In addition, Mrs. Querimit pointed 
out that "Crack" is being purchased for 
$10 in New York City and being sold 
for double the amount in rural areas. 



CompuSource 
Computer Center 

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,^ith sec 



Mondaj*. October 13, 1986 
1 p.m. ^ 3:30 p.m. 



SPRING GARDEN COLLEGE 



4nSParLICHTDMonU?, Pel. 13, »M 



o^ 



WHICHEVER 

'CANDIDATE' 

GETS THE 

MOST VOTES WILL 

BE THE COMIC STRIP 

PUBLISHED IN THE 

SPOTLIGHT. <C> 

Vote Early ^O^ 

...and Often!!! ^ V 

.0^ 






.'^^' 



ONLY ONE CENT 



One U.S. Dollar ge 



# 



GARFIELtr by Jim Davia 

! \ 

Hie cat who has become a national institution. 





ONE CENT F 




1,000 participate 



FIremeD itruBk karriciB; lo ihed lir lulu thil ire ilmort oit of lir. 
Tbe tmonni of lir ia Ike Uiki for Ike Inlilig letaioi wu mlBimil ud wken 
only Iwo mlnnlei of Ume wu lefl, beOi weni off lo warn Ike flreneg. Tke 
lanki ud nuki kid lo be remoTcd In order lo bitatbe nomuDy agtln. 
ISPOTUGHT photo by Kathy L. Cobb/ 



■ Continued fiom Page I 
ren Fucbs Jr., a lire dispatcher with the 
Brooklyn, N.Y., Communications Of- 
fice, featured action-pacited slides of 
fires in the New York area. 

Fuchs is a fire photographer whose 
photographs have been published in 
many national and international 
magazines. 

He is also the author of a book 
featuring fire photography, titled, 
Where is the Fire? 

During the weekend, students 
received training in several areas, in- 
cluding vehicle rescue, bus rescue, water 
rescue, truck company operations, 
smoke mask, and aircraft crash rescue 
and firefighting, among others. 

In addition, a new course, Food 
Hospitality for Fire Department Aux- 
iliary, was offered, and instructed by 



CoUfge instructor Mrs. Ann R. Miglio. 

Mrs. MigMo said she was assisted 
by Mrs. Vivian P. Moon, food and 
hospitahty instructor, who discussed 
sanitation procedures with the group. 

Other items covered by the instruc- 
tor included pastry-maUng, garnishing, 
soupi and stocks, merchandising, 
record-keeping, and preparation and 
serving of a full-course meal. 

The course. Track Company 
Operations, included search and rescue 
techniques, forceable entry, ventilation, 
and effective use of self<ontained 
breathing apparatus. 

The course was instructed by Lt. 
Frank Miale, a New York City Fire 
Department ladder company specialist, 
and Robert Kehrbaum, a retired bat- 
talion chief with the New York City Rre 
Department. 



8K)TUGHTaMonl«T, Oct. U, 1W« d5 



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r A VOTE...!!! 



gets 100 VotesI 



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LYCOMING 

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Imtnicton in Water Reme ihow tke proper procedire for "roUig i Fbcmen lie mw to cnt throigk poiU m wtadow fraaei to Hike wfeit li 

drowning victim ont of tlie witer in i net if ke li nncoudoni." [SPOTLIGHT Inown m "pictnic wlndowi", to lift rictiw oat of i Imi. [SPOTUGHT photo 
photo by Donna L. Trimble/ by Donna L. TrimbleJ 



6oSP0TUGHTDMMilqr, Oct. 13, 1*H 

Meet 
Your 
SGA 



Not pictured are Daniel R. Partscli, DD, 
Sidman, senator; Deborah A. Balliet, DA, 
HoUidaysburg, committee chairperson; Darcie 
A. Kelsey, AK, Willianuport, committee 
chairperson, and Michele A. Schuler, WP, 
Willianuport, committee chairperson. 






I ; 



William J. Fritz 
Homer City 
President 



Maria I. Herold, GS 

Selinsgrove 

Vice President 



Kathy L. Cobb, IS 

Williamsport 

Treasurer, 

Governance Council Rep 




Joshua J. Burke, OA 


James T. Corle, NM 


Lynnee K. Wasson, BM 


Karen L. Campbell, GA 


York 


New Enterprise 


Pine Grove Mills 


Moscow 


Parliamentarian, 


Programming Development/ 


Student Awareness, 


Senator 


Student Action Officer 


Evaluation Oliicer, 
Governance Council Rep 


Communications Officer 





Barry A. RathmeU, ET 

North Bend 

Senator 




Barry D. Blumqoiit, AC 


Susan K. Baymer, CA 


Brian J. Winters, CA 


Warren 


Huibesvillc 


Brookville 


Senator 


Senator 


Senator, 

Chairperson, 

Food Committee 



William C. Cahett, Jr., EL 

Duncansville 

Senator 



Roger L. Snook, FT 

Beaver Springs 

Senator 




Christopher V. Wey, HS 
Dewart 

Chairperson, 
Student Awareness Committee 



Janice E. Appleton, SA 

Towanda 

Chairperson, 

Student Action Committee 



Stephanie L. Sewesky 
Willianuport 
Chairperson, 

Programming Com 



PBL meets, discusses plans; officers 
to be installed 



Several issues were resolved and 
future plans were made for the coming 
semester during the Phi Beta Lambda 
meeting last Tuesday, Oct. 7, aaording 
to Paul W. Goldfeder, PBL state ad- 
viser. 

Goldfeder said committees will be 
appointed and amiounced at the next 
meeting, scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 
21. Members may apply by contacting 
PBL president Martin T. Green, 
business management student from 
Williamsport, or PBL treasurer, Lisa A. 
Fobner, business management student 
from Montoursville. 

The main thrust will be to help 
charitable organizations within the com- 
munity, Goldfeder stated. 



Plans were being made to include 
help for the Lycoming Health and Lung 
Association, the American Red Cross, 
the Salvation Army and the American 
Rescue Workers. 

A formal installation of PBL of- 
ficers will soon take place as well, 
Goldefeder said. 

Social activities for the organiza- 
tion wiU be announced in the future. 

Goldfeder added plans are com- 
plete for a bake sale to be held in the 
Academic Center lobby next Wednes- 
day, Oct. 22. 

In addition, the new membership 
period is still open. Any student wishing 
to join the organization can apply in the 
PBL ofBce, Room 3, Academic Center. 





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SPOTLlGHTDMoidH. Oct. 13, 1»M d7 



collegiate crossword 



re Mr? ?! Hn 

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jS 57 ■■58 59 



ACROSS 

I Pocket the cue ball 

8 Airline cwnpany 

14 Beforehand bargain 

15 Large shellfish 

16 Shoots a gun again 

17 Leaves 

18 Lady sheep 

19 Noisy disturbances 

21 Part of NNP 

22 "God's Little •' 

24 Slender fish 

25 Italian seaport 

26 Prearranged fight 

27 Jazz percussion 
instruments 

29 Arabian seaport 

30 Elinor of the Het 
32 Gershwin piece, for 

34 College courses 

36 Track team 

39 Self-centered one 

43 Newspaper item, for 
short 

44 Makeup of cards 

46 Football's 

Graham 

47 Laminated minora 



48 German pronoun 

49 tide 

50 Certain lodge 
member 

51 Fur coat materia 

55 Wire measure 

56 Press 

58 Solvent ingrediei 

60 Incomplete 

61 Holy places 

62 Fitted within om 



1 Butter, J. 

2 Hair styl. 

3 Sports of 



25 Low-pitched 
woodwind 

27 Graiimatical 
structures 

28 Pitcher's statis 
31 Mr. Whitney 

33 Slangy throw 

35 Sailed 

36 Aaron's specialt 

37 Texas city 

38 Comedian Don — 
40 First on the Us 

(2 wds.) 



5 Infield coveri 

6 Liz Taylor roT 

7 Red-letter worn 

8 Above: Ger. 

9 Siestas 

10 Longshoreman's 

union (abbr.) 
H Whirlwind 
12 Became a conte 



worker 



54 Type of ins 
57 Ending for 

I 59 Mr. Conway 



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SoSPOTUGBTDMoidV. Oct. 13, IfU 

Talent roster 
forms available 

Talent rosters are annually 
distributed by the College Board to 
four-year colleges and universities. 

Some institutions use the roster in 
awarding scholarships to outstanding 
minority students who plan to transfer 
to a four-year institution, according to 
Dr. Daniel J. Doyle, Integrated Studies 
Division director. 

Requirements are at least a 2.75 
cumulative grade point average, to be 
scheduled to receive an associate degree, 
or will have completed at least 60 credits 
by the end of the 1986-87 academic 
year. Dr. Doyle said. 

Eligible students may submit their 
names for inclusion in the talent roster. 
Dr. Doyle stated, adding there is no 
cha:'ge to be included on this list. 

For further information and to 
receive a nomination form, students 
may go to the Integrated Studies office. 
Room 211, in the Academic Center. 



BULLETIN BOARD 

Week of Monday, Oct. IS through Sunday, Oct. 19 



MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 to 9 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 14, 
Room 133, Academic Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon, tomonow, Tuesday, Oct. 14, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 15, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., next Tuesday, Oct. 21, Room 329, 
Academic Center: general meeting. 

Student Government Association... executive meeting, tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Oct. 14, 4 p.m.. Room B107, Lifelong Education Center: open to executive of- 
ficers only. 

Student Government Association... Senate meeting, tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Oct. 14, 5 p.m.. Room BI07, Lifelong Education Center: open to all students 
and staff. 

EVENTS 

Bloodmobile... Student Government Association sponsoring, 10 a.m. to 2 
p.m.. Earth Sciences Campus. 

Stage... Play, That Championship Season by Jason Miller, presented by 
The WiUiamsport Players in conjunction with the College: Opening night, this 
Friday, Oct. 17. Runs Oct. 18 and 19 and again Oct. 24 and 25. Academic 
Center Auditorium. 



Play opens 
this Friday 
in ACC Auditorium 

The WiUiamsport Players in con- 
junction with the College will present 
That Championship Season, a play by 
Jason Miller, five times this month 
-with an opening night set for this up- 
coming Friday. 

Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, College 
activities coordinator, listed the dates 
on which the play, a Pulitzer Prize win- 
ner, will be presented: 

- This Friday, Saturday, and Sun- 
day, and next Friday, oct. 24 and Sun- 
day, Oct. 25. Curtain times are 7:30 
p.m.for this Sunday's performance and 
8 p.m. for all others. 

Tickets for the performances are $3 
for students, faculty, and staff. General 
admission is $5. 

Season tickets are $10 for students, 
faculty, and staff. General admission 
$18. 



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SPOTLIGHT 



Moadiy. Oct. 20, I9W • Vol. 22, No. 9 • 4 Pigcs 
WlUluniport Aru Commonit; College • WUIiuuport, Pi. 17701 



FIRST MEETING OF INTERNAL 
GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE TODAY 




GARFIELD WINSI Garfield won the 
SPOTLIGHT'S "penny-a-vote election" last 
week. And, one day, Ms. JoAnn R. Frsmlotti, 
center, coordinator of College activities, stop- 
ped by to explain the "fun activity" to visitors 
Qlovanna E. Favale, far left, of Milan, Italy, and 
Carlo Rocca, of Turin, Italy. At the voting table 
that day were Lisa R. Lumbard, seated 
center.chalrparson for the SPOTLIGHT fund- 
raiser and a general studies student from 



Wllllamsport, and Ruth Ann Hlxson, seated 
right, a Journalism student from New Columbia. 
Miss Lumbard said Garfield won by 668 votes 
[$6.68]. The "election proceeds" will be divid- 
ed for a contribution to the Lycoming County 
Literacy Project and as a part payment for 
publication rights for the comic strip In the 
campus newspaper. 

[SPOTLIGHT PHOTO I DONNA LTRMBLE] 



SGA sets objectives for the year 



oOD By Kathy L.Cobb 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The Student Government 
Association met last Tuesday to 
discuss organizational strategies and 
objectives for the 1 986-1 987 academic 
year, according to William J.Fritz, SGA 
president and plumbing and heating 
student from Homer City. 

During the meeting, Mrs. l^/larla I. 
Herold. SGA vice president and 
general studies student from Selin- 
sgrove, presented the objectives 
which were collective ideas submitted 
by all SGA senators and officers. 

D n D 

Included were elections and pro- 
gramming, to be completed one 
semester before actual need; the stu- 



dent recognition banquet, held each 
spring; affecting an SGA budget in- 
crease for 1987-1988; amendment of 
the SGA constitution and job descrip- 
tions, and establishment of directional 
signs on campus. 

IVIrs. Herold said another high con- 
sideration was the upgrading of visibili- 
ty and increased programming. 

f^s. Kathy L. Cobb, SGA treasurer 
and individual studies student from 
Wllllamsport, discussed the need for a 
budget committee, which would 
evaluate the current budget, assist in 
programming spending, and develop 
and recommend an increased budget 
for next year. 

D D D 

Also during the meeting, Fritz ad- 



dressed the importance of upgrading 
SGA committee interest. 

"Most of the work is done at the 
committee level," he said, indicating 
that all students are invited to become 
committee members. He also pointed 
out that senators should become in- 
volved in committee work. 

Fritz said the next scheduled 
Senate meeting is tomorrow, Tues- 
day, Oct. 21, at 5 p.m. in Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

He stressed that all students, 
faculty, and staff "are welcome" to at- 
tend that meeting. 

The next executive meeting is 
scheduled for 4 p.m. tomorrow in 
Room B107, LEC. It is open only to 
SGA officers. 



The first meeting of the 
Internal Governance Struc- 
ture is scheduled for today, 
3:30 to 5 p.m. in Le Jeune 
Chef, according to Mrs. 
Veronica Muzic, chairper- 
son of the Governance 
Council and professor of 
English. 

During this orientation 
meeting, the Council 
members and Committee, 
members will discuss 
reporting and communica- 
tion mechanisms, the 
hierarchical schemata of 
the system, identification of 
issues, and roles and 
responsibilities, Mrs. Muzic 
said. 

Scheduling of in- 
dividual Council and Com- 
mittee meetings will also be 
discussed. 

Mrs. Muzic added that 
refreshments will be serv- 
ed. 

■■■ Please turn to Age 4 



Transfer Day 
'successful' 

Approximately 200 students at- 
tended Transfer Day held in the Gym 
last Monday, according to Thomas C. 
Shoff, transfer counselor. 

Shoff said there were 21 colleges 
and universities represented. 

Shoff added that other students in- 
terested in transferring may stop in to 
see him in Room 157, Learning 
Resources Center or may telephone 
him at College Ext. 7246. 

The counselor noted that in 
November there will be'workshops for 
Interviewing and resume writing. 
Weldon W. Michael, career develop- 
ment specialist, will be in charge of the 
workshops. 



2nSPOTLIOHTaMond«y, Oct. 20, 1986. 



Viewpoint 

Disinformation... Its effects are far reaching 



The SPOTLIGHT comments 

Giving false information to the media creates a deplorable situation. Like a 
stone thrown into a placid pool, the ripples are far reaching. 

We call it disii\formalion, but it is, in fact manipulation of the media to 
achieve some goal of an individual, an organization, or a governmental body at 
the expense of the media and, most importantly, the public. 

• • • 

As the puWic becomes aware that false information has been dispensed by a 
certain medium, doubt is cast as to the credibility of that medium. 

The press goes back to its source and says, "This is what I was told." 

NBC sitcoms: beyond belief! 

A Television Review by Catherine A. Hannon 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Stqff 
The key element that seems to be missing from NBC television shows this 
season is realism. Neither the Cosby Show nor Alf is believable; life just isn't like 
it's represented in these sitcoms. 

The Cosby Show is considered by many people to be the best show on 
television. What other shows are they comparing it with? 

There are many other television shows that are more entertaining and more 
believable. They just require more intelligence on the audience's part. 

• • • 

The strength of the Cosby Show is that it shows the family in a good light. 
It's main problem is that it doesn't show an average family. The parents on the 
show don't really treat their children like children. They treat them more Uke 
equals -which takes away some of the realism from life. 

On the show, the kids don't even act like normal kids! They're perfect 
children... well-behaved -- and rarely argue. These kids don't even wear jeans!!! 
They wear designer clothes! I have never seen kids that don't wear jeans once in 
a while! It gives me the impression that to be in a close family, you can't wear 
Levis -- you have to wear designer clothes by Bill Blass. 

The character of the youngest girl in the show really irnlates me. She oozes 
sweetness and cuteness like Karo syrup. I'd love to do something to upset her 
and make her look less cute - like cutting off one of her three braids. This would 
give us an opportunity to see if she can act more convincingly than a piece of fur- 
niture. 

• • • 

Alf is a new show. It's about an alien life form (A.L.F.) that comes to earth 
when his planet is destroyed and is taken in by a human family. Too bad his 
planet was destroyed - or the audience would have the good fortune to have Alf 
sent back. Alf gives new meaning to the words, "rude house guest". 

Alf is an insult to cat lovers and people with intelligence everywhere. He is 
always trying to eat the family cat. Not to mention he makes dumb jokes every 
few seconds that get laughter at the expense of the humans that have taken him 
in. 

In my opinion, Alf is ugly, not cute. He's a muppet's nightmare with a big 
nose. He is sarcastic and not at all well-behaved. He is always causing trouble 
that could lead to the neighbor's finding out about him. If I were part of the 
family that had taken him in, I would have kicked Alf out in the first episode. 

• • • 

Alf doesn't seem to have any redeeming qualities whatsoever and I don't see 
why NBC keeps this ridiculous show on the air - except to try to get high 
ratings. 

Both The Cosby Show and Alf are testing the limits of human intelligence 
with their content. I'd like to see some more realism, more human emotion, and 
plots put into the shows to which we are subjected each new season. 



Impressions 



Impressions... 

The new literary/art/photography magazine 

welcomes student, faculty, and stqff submissions 

Deadline for submissions: November 17 

Drop Off: SPOTLIGHT Office, 

Room 7, Lower Level, Academic Center 

Fall 1986 Issue to be Available the Week of Dec. 2 



The source replies, "Oh, but you misinterpreted what I said. I said this... 
not what you printed (broadcast)." 

• • • 

The press then has to extricate itself from the murky waters of skepticism. 
Sources must be proven. This puts the press on the defensive to show that the 
source was irresponsible in giving false information. 

As the battle wages over disinformation, more dirt is dredged up from the 
bottom of the once placid pool. Soon, the public cannot see clearly either oppo- 
nent and does not know whom to believe. 

It is best that straightforward, accurate information be presented to the 
media so that it can be reported responsibly to keep the public informed. 

It: Steplien King's latest liorror story 
not for reading in the darl(! 

A Book Review by Ms. Arlene L. Lumbard, contributor 
and Ms. Kathy L. Cobb, SPOTLIGHT managing editor 
IT, Stephen King's longest book to date, boasts 1,138 pages and a clever, 
evil creature of many disguises ~ "It". 
Just what is "It"? 

"It" is Pennywise the Clown; a mummy; a werewolf; voices in the sink 
drain -voices of the dead. It is whatever scares you the most, whatever creeps 
through your childhood nightmares. 

• • • 

IT takes you back to those youthful, carefree days wheh imaginations run 
rampant, when just about anything can turn into a monster of sorts and scare 
you out of your wits. For King's characters, it means being scared, literally, to 
death. 

Despite its length and a few segments which drag, the book is easy reading. 
King's easy identification with youth makes his storytelling realistic - so realistic 
that it scares you, and sticks in the back of your mind. 

• '• • 

King knows how to capture your imagination and instill fears. IT leaves you 
with the feeling that around any comer, on any street - even in your own home 
- something terrible could happen to you. 

So, if you catch us looking over our shoulders, you'll know why!! 

The Student Action CoMMirrEE 
Needs You! 

A Utter to SPOTLIGHT Readers 
from Janice E. Applelon, Student Action Committee chairperson 

As you probably know, this positive committee is part of the Student 
Government Association (SGA). Its purpose is to gather, analyze, and in- 
vestigate ideas, suggestions or problems that students may have concerning Col- 
lege life. 

SGA works with various committees for student needs. We sincerely want to 
do our best and for that to happen, we need your input and participation. 

Without you, SGA simply won't have anything to work with or to work for. 

If you have good ideas and would hke to see some changes, do something 
about it. Get involved! It's important for the betterment of our school. 

If you are interested in becoming a member, please leave your name and 
number in the SGA office. Meeting times are announced in The SPOTLIGHT, 
New Week News, and over WW AS. 

A suggestion box located in the SGA office (right next to the Rec Center) is 
eagerly awaiting suggestions from VOU. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday. Oct. 20, 1986 - Vol. 22, No. •-. 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning of the academic year, except for 
College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The V^'illiamsport Area 
Community College, 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W Third St., Williamsporf, Pa. 1 7701 
Telephone: (71 7) 326-3761 , Extension 7533. 



Opin 



STAFF 

Kathy L Cobb, h^anaging Editor: Brenda M. Vibert. Associate Editor: Donna M. Tnmble, 
Photograpt^y Editor: Michael Waldron, Advertising Director: Lisa R. Lumbard, Ct^iet Com- 
positor. Marge M. DiNardo, Production Manager 

HEPORTEHS/STAFF ASSISTANTS 

Catherine A Hannon. Ruth Ann Hlxson. Marc Varano. Todd Patterson, Janine M 
Sullivan, Diane L. Shaheen, Angela Sipe, and Margie Flanagan. 

Contributing Faculty Adviser: Anthony N. Clllo, associate professor of journaiism 



Women's Forum today begins 
new series of campus programs 



SPOTUOHTDMonday, Oct. 20, 1986 J 



"Choices", sponsored by the 
Women's Forum, will present a pro- 
gram entitled "Knowing Your Sexuali- 
ty", according to Dr. Jeannette Fraser, 
dean of educational research, planning 
and evaluation, and Mrs. Veronica M. 
Muzic, professor of English. 

This is an informal presentation 
exploring and defining responsibility to 
one's self and others, according to 
Mrs. Iv^uzic. 

It will be held today from 1 1 ;30 
a.m. to 1 p.m. in Le Jeune Chef in the 
Lifelong Education Center. 

They're going fast 
says coordinator 

Tickets for the College's Perform- 
ing Artists Series which begins in 
January are going fast, according to 
Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotli, coordinator of 
College activities. 

Students can buy season tickets 
to the Series - which includes A 
Chorus Line (Jan. 31), Steve 
Landesberg (Feb, 21), and Maynard 
Ferguseon and High Voltage (March 
14). 

Those who wish to buy tickets can 
do so at the College Activities Office, 
first floor of the Gym, or may telephone 
College Ext. 7269. 

YOUR VOTE COUNTSI 



Today's program will be the first in 
a series of "Choices" luncheons. 
Students may bring a "brown bag 
lunch" and talk with others on contem- 
porary issues. 

This session, she said, is free to 
students, faculty,and staff. 

Co-advisers are Mrs. Muzic, Dr. 
Fraser, and Ms. Kathryn A. Ferrence, 
counselor. 

Additional information is available 
by telephoning College Ext. 4763 or by 
visiting the Peer Information and Refer- 
ral Center, Room 105, Gym. 



Suicide is topic 

of seminar 
at North Campus 

How to understand and In- 
tervene In adolescent suicidal 
behavior will be the focus of a 
one-day seminar to be held at 
the North Campus of the Col- 
lege this Wednesday. 

The seminar will be held 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 
Is sponsored by the Tioga 
County Human Services Agen- 
cy and the Center for Lifelong 
Education at the North Cam- 
pus. 

Information Is available by 
telephoning (717) 724-7703. 



41 6 River Avenue 



>Typing(Gon.Mu>„) •Rubber Stamps 
•PriTile MtU Boio (Ke;! 
•Puqiort Pholoi •Pboto Copies 
>Notu]r Public •Resnme Writing 



•GUI Wrapping 'Pickiglng SoppUet 

•Pwkiging •Electronic Mill 

•Answering Service •Word Proctuing 

•GIftwrap SnppUes •Term Pipcn 



"'"li.X'K-Tp.m' ''■'"• PHONE 327-1766 

Prof«Mlonal packaging and ahtpping of your matarlala In minutaa. 
Wa'll ahip your packaga via UPS or, If your pacfcago naada to gat tfiara quickar, wa'll 
ahip It Air Expraaa tor ovarnlgfit dallvary. 




The cast tor Jason Miller's That Championship Season, scheduled tor 8 
p.m. this Friday, Oct. 24, and 8 p.m. this Saturday, Oct. 25, Includes (first 
row, left to right) Dave Person as James Daley; Ernest Qigllo as the Coach, 
and Jerry Neece as Tom Daley. Second row Is Charles M. Knight as 
George SIkowskI and Frank Fedele as Phil Romano. The performances, 
sponsored by the Wllllamsport Players and directed by Frank Fedele, are 
to be held In the Academic Center Auditorium. [Courtesy photo] 



New York City 
reservations 



Schoiarsiiips 
for women now 



still being taken being offered 



Reservations are still being taken 
for two bus trips scheduled to go to 
New York City, on Saturdays, Dec. 6 
and 13, according to Ms. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

Tickets are $20 for students, facul- 
ty, staff and alumni of the College, and 
$22 for the public. 

Reservations may be made by 
calling College extension 7269 or 
visiting Ms. Fremiotti's office on the 
first floor of the Gymnasium. 

Mrs. Fremiotti emphasized that 
students, faculty, staff are entitled to 
one reduced price per ID. All others 
must pay the price of public tickets, 
even if they are accompanying so- 
meone from the College. 



Give Blood/It Counts 



The Wllllamsport Chapter of the 
American Business Women's Associa- 
tion now is offering two scholarships to 
female students of the College, accor- 
ding to an announcement from the 
FinancialAid Office, 

There will be scholarships offered 
for the Spring semester and again in 
June. 

Applications are available In the 
Financial Aid Office, Room 201, 
Academic Center. The deadline for 
submission is Dec. 26. 

D,D,D 

Drink 

Drive 

Die 



V 

X 



CONSIDERING A HEALTH CAREER? 
PRACTICAL NURSING MAY BE FOR YOU! 

3-semester certificate program 

59 transferable credits 

816 hours of hands-on experience in 3 clinical settings 

1 536 total course/lab hours 

MAXIMUM 1 5;1 student/teacher ratio 

Jobs throughout the stale 

STOP IN ACC 420 FOR MORE DETAILS ON NURSING 

Applicants musi be residents of Psnns/lvawa 




4aSPOTUOHTDMonday, Oct. 20, I9M 

FIRST MEETING OF 

INTERNAL 

GOVERNANCE 

STRUCTURE 

TODAY 



■m Conliniudfiom Pan I 

83 faculty/staff 

to serve on committees 

Eighty-three College faculty and staff personnel were recently elected/ap- 
pointed to serve on five Internal Governance System commitlees, according 
to Dr. Jeannette L. Fraser. dean of educational planning research and evalua- 
tion. 

Dr. Fraser said that each committee will be responsible for electing a 
committee chairperson from within the parameters of the committee 
members. 

In addition to the 83 faculty/staff, 1 1 students were selected to serve. 
Selections were based first on nominations, then on academic standing, 
leadership qualities, and assertlveness. 

The 83 newly elected/appointed faculty/staff, and student committee 
members are: 




PCTOBli-R P/A 



f+--6PA\, 



D D D COLLEGE COUNCIL D D D 
Chairperson: Mr*. Veronica M. Muzic, professor of English. 
Faculty: 

Business and Computer Technology Division - Gary R. Knebel. instruc- 
tor, computer science; two-year term. 

Construction Technology Division - Robert W. Stull, professof, electrical 
occupations; two-year term. 

Developmental, Counseling, and Learning Resources Center - Thomas 
C. Shoff, counselor; two-year term. 

Health Sciences Division - Mrs. Margaret L. McKeehan, professor, prac- 
tical nursing; three-year term. 

Industrial Technology Division - Lament E. Butters, associate professor, 
civil engineering technology; three-year term. 

Integrated Studies Division - Mrs. Nancy Bowers, instructor, 
mathematics; three-year term. 

Natural Resource Management Division - James E. Pivirotto, associate 
professor, forest technology; three-year term. 

Transportation Technologies Division - John K. Hammond, associate 
professor, automotive; two-year term. 

Secondary Vocational - Paul S. Schriner, associate professor, welding; 
three-year term. 

D D D 

College StaH: 

President's Council - Dr. Jeannette L. Fraser, dean, educational 
reserarch, planning, and evaluation, two-year term. 

Academic Affairs - Dr. Don B. Bergerstock, director. Business and Com- 
puter Technologies, three-year term. 

Administrative Affairs - Carl L, Christiansen, director, computer services, 
two-year term. 

Student Services - Donald S. Shade, director, Financial Aid. 

APT not L - Ms. Patricia Baldwin, manager. Word Processing Center, 
three-year term. 

Classified - Mrs. Marian E. Blackburn, secretary to the director of Lifelong 
Education, three-year term. 

Service - Robert E.Stepp, custodian, two-year term. 

North Campus - Dr. William J. Lex, associate dean, two-year term. 

a a a 

Appointed: 

President's Designee - Dr. Robert G. Bowers, executive assistant for in- 
ternal affairs. 

Committee Chairs (5)- to be determined by committee members. 

Students: 

Kathy L.Cobb, individual studies student from Williamsport, one-year 
term. 

James T. Corle, nursery management student from New Enterprise, one- 
year term. 

ODD CURRICULUM COMMITTEE D D D 
Elected: 

Business and Computer Technology Division - Ronald L. Rock, pro- 
fessor, business administration. 

Construction Technology Division - William A. Kranz, instructor, air con- 
ditioning and refrigeration. 

Developmental, Counseling, and Learning Resources Center - Mrs. 
Marilyn G. Bodnar, reader services librarian. 

Health Sciences Division - Harry C. Specht, assistant professor, physical 
education. 

Industrial Technology Division - William A. Holmes, instructor, machine 
tool technology. 

Integrated Studies Division - Dr. Peter Dumanis, professor, English. 

Natural Resource Management Division - Dennis E. Fink, instructor, hor- 
ticulture. 

Transportation Technologies Division - William E. Curry, instructor, 
diesel mechanics. 

Academic Division Directors - Dr. Ralph A. Home, director, Construction 
Technology Division. 

Academic Coordinator - Mrs, Linda Falcheck-Clark, coordinator, prac- 
tical nursing. 

D D D 
Appointed: 

Academic Affairs - Dr. James P. Rice, dean of educational advancement. 

Administrative Affairs - Ms, Connie R, Kelsey, assistant registrar. 

Student Services - Dennis L. Dunkleberger, assistant director, admis- 
sions/recruiter. 

nan 

students: 

Melanie N, Hampton, computer information systems student from Mon- 
toursvilie, one year term, 

Ruth A, Mase. human services student from Liberty,, one year term. 



D D D ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND ISSUES D D D 
Elected: 

Business and Computer Technology Division - Alex W. Bailey, pro- 
fessor, business administration. 

Construction Tectinology Division - William H. Ealer, assistant professor, 
architecture. 

Developmental, Counseling, and Learning Resources Center - Ms. 
Kathyrn A. Ferrence, counselor. 

Health Sciences Division - Daria L. Brov^n, instructor, dental hygiene. 

Industrial Technology Division - David Lynn Turney, instructor, machine 
shop. 

Integrated Studies Division - Dr. Richard M. Sweeney, professor of 
English. 

Natural Resource Management Division - Richard J. Weilminster, 
associate professor, horticulture. 

Transportation Technologies Division - no candidate. 

Academic Division Directors - Dr. Daniel Doyle, director, Integrated 
Studies. 

D D n 

Appointed: 

Academic Affairs - Dr. John F. Thompson, associate academic dean. 

Student Services - Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director. Advisement and 
Career Services. 

Educational Research, Planning and Evaluation - Dr. Robert W. Wolfe, 
assistant director. Integrated Studies. 

Developmental Studies - R. Dean Foster, director, Developmental 
Studies. 

D D D 
Students: 

Dale A. Cole, accounting student from Hughesville, one-year term. 

Christopher V. Wey, general studies student from Dewart, one-year term. 

D n n STUDENT AFFAIHSn D D 
Elected: 

Developmental, Counseling, Learning Resources - Mrs. Mary Ann R. 
Lampman, instructor, reading. 

At Large - Mrs. Rae Ann Karichner, (Health Sciences) 2-year term, assis- 
tant professor of dental hygiene. 

Charles A. Brooke (Integrated Studies) 3-year term, assistant professor, 
math. 

Thomas Zimmerman (Integrated Studies) 2-year term, instructor, human 
services/social science. 

Richard W. Rankinen (Natural Resources) 3-year term, assistant pro- 
fessor, forest technology. 

APT not L - William C. Bradshaw, director, experiential learning. 

Classified - Gloria H. Valencik, secretary to director of Business and 
Computer Technology Division. 

nan 

Appointed: 

Academic Affairs - Ms. Davie Jane Nestarick, director, Health Science 
Division. 

Administrative Affairs - William T. Ward, information center soft- 
ware/device specialist. 

Student Services - Chester D. Shuman, director. Admissions and College 
Activities. 

Supervisor of Security - Cecil C. Cryder, supervisor of security 

Coordinator of College Activities - Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, College ac- 
tivities coordinator 

D D D 
Students: 

Mary Jo Bubb, computer information systems student from Williamsport, 
one-year term. 

Joseph K. Carlson, computer information systems student from 
Bellefonte, one-year term. 

William J. Fritz, plumbing and heating student from Homer City, one-year 
term. 

D D D HUMAN RESOURCES D D D 

At Large - Frank L Porter, (Integrated Studies) 2-year term, associate 
professor, English. 

Benjamin H. Eldred (Natural Resources) 3-year term, assistant professor, 
service and operation of heavy construction equipment. 

Mrs. Vivian P. Moon, (Health Sciences) 2-year term, associate professor, 
food service/dietetics. 

Ms. Patricia J, Shoff, (Business and Computer Technology) 3-year term, 
associate professor, business administration. 

APT not L - Mrs. Barbara A. Danko, director of Lifelong Education. 

Dr. Edward M. Geer, director of Secondary Vocational Programs 

Classified - Mrs. Jane R. Miles, secretary to dean of development, and 
Mrs. Dorothy G. Dincher, general ledger bookkeeper. 

Service - Michael H. Miller, groundskeeper, and Edward J. Bergstrom, 
carpenter. » 

D D D 



SPOTLIOHTnMonday, Oct. 20, 19860 5 
Appointed: 

Academic Affairs - Dr. James E. Middleton, dean of academic affairs. 

Employee and Community Relations - Dr. Miles Williams, dean of 
employee and community relations. 

Executive Assistant for Internal Affairs - Dr. Robert G. Bowers. 

Director of Personnel Services - Mrs. Linda M. Morris, director of person- 
nel services. 

a n D 

D D D LONGE RANGE PLANNING D D D 
Elected: 

At Large (5) - Robert L. Hafer. instructor, auto body. Transportation, 
2-year term. 

- James E. Logue, associate professor of English, Integrated Studies, 
3-year term. 

- Patrick D. Murphy, assistant professor, advertising art. Integrated 
Studies, 3-year term. 

- William L. Stevens, assistant professor of service and operation of 
heavy construction equipment. Natural Resources, 3-year term. 

- Mrs. Mary E. Temple, instructor, practical nursing. Health Sciences, 
2-year term. 

Classified or Service - Michelle E. Aunkst, secretary to the director of 
Health Sciences. 

ODD 

Appointed: 

Academic Affairs - Dr. James E. Middleton, dean. 

Administrative Affairs - David A. Hoyes. director, business operations. 

Development - Paul Petcavage, coordinator of grants management and 
development. 

Student Services - Dr. William J. Martin, dean. 

Educational Research, Planning and Evaluation - Dr. Jeannette L. Eraser, 
dean. 

Employee and Community Relations - Mrs. Elaine J. Lambert, director, 
communications 

D DD 

Students: 

Harold J. Harper, dental hygiene student from Millersburg, one-year term. 
R. Lynn Sherllnski, human services student from Williamsport one-year 



The party begins. 
2 drinks later. 



;r 4 drinks. 

Alter 5 drinks. 

7 drinks in aU. ^ — 




The mons you dnnk, the more coondination you lose. 
That's a tact, plain and simple. 

It's also a fact that 1 2 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine and 
i 'A ounces of spints all fiave the same alcohol content. And 
consumed in excess, all can affect you . Still, people drink too 
much and then go out and expect to handle a car 

V/hen you dnnk too much, you can't handle a car 

You can't even handle a pen. 



k public service message from WiW^OffeiS Institute 



fiaSPOrUOHTDMoDday, Oct. 20, 1986 

Scholarship 
applications 
now available 

The Elks National Foundation Is of- 
fering a $2,000 scfiolarship to students 
planning to pursue a voca- 
tional/technical course leading to an 
associate degree, certificate, or 
diploma, but less than a baccalaureate 
degree, according to Donald S Shade, 
financial aid director. 

The scholarship Is for $1 ,000 for 
two years. A high school diploma or 
'GED Is not required. 

Applications may be obtained In 
the Financial Aid Office on the second 
floor of the Academic Center. 

The deadline for applying Is Nov 
25. 

Students interested In applying, 
said Shade, should return the applica- 
tions to the Elks Lodge in their 
hometowns. 




S.N.O.W. ELECTS - The Student Nurses of W.A.C.C. have elected 
new officers. Tliey are, In front row, Christine E. Cole, at left, who Is a 
third semester student from Wllllsmsport and president of the group, and 
Holly A. Kllnger, also a third semester student from Beaver Springs, one of 
the two vice presidents. In the back row are Pattle Jo Schom, second 
semester student from WIMIamsport, vice president; Pamela J. Saylor, se- 
cond semester student from Lock Haven, treasurer, and Karen E.Ambs, 
second semester student from Dushore, secretary. [SPOTLIGHT photo] 

Phi Beta Lambda holds meeting: 
hay ride and bake sale planned 



Government Surplus 

Military Clothing 

and CI^*^ 
Equipment / LJ 

Appalachian Outfitters 

15 East Water Street 

Muncy, PA 17772 



Monday - Thursday 9-7 
Friday 9-9 

Saturday 10-5 

Phone 717-546-8296 



Phi Beta Lambda held its latest 
meeting Wednesday at the home of 
Paul W. Goldfeder, PBL state adviser 
and adviser to the College's chapter. 

The next meeting will be held on 
Tuesday, Oct. 21. at 3:30 p.m. in 
Room 329, Academic Center. 

Next Wednesday, a movie will be 
presented and a meeting held In 
Goldleder's home. All members, the 
adviser said, are being urged to attend 
"this brief meeting and movie night". 
Refreshments vi/ill be served. 

The adviser said that PBL will 
meet weekly until further notice. 

He also noted two events planned 
for this week: 

- A- hayride this Thursday. 
Ivlembers are to meet in front of the 
Academic Center at 5:45 p.m. if a ride 
is needed, he said. Directions will be 
given. Refreshments will be served 
after the ride. 

-A bake sale this Wednesday, 



;:«ji!X*::*2Ki::*3K5*aK:iK:!i!::«3^ 

ALWAYS OPEN - ?' 

ALL NIGHT, 5" 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS f 




Snacks 

Hoi ami Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



BENSON 




from 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Academic 
Center Foyer. Among items to be sold 
are baked goods, candy, soda, and 
chips. 

SportsCard 

Today: 

Basketball, and volleyball 
leagues.. .4 to 10 p.m. in the Gym. 

Weight Room open. ..4 to 10 p.m. 

Karate class, ,7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 
Tomorrow, Oct. 21: 

No Open Gym this night. 

Pool and Dart Tournament in Rec 
Center,..? p.m. until finish. Sign up in 
Rec Center by Ivlonday night. 

Weight Room open. .4 to 10 p.m. 
Wednesday, Oct. 22: 

No Open Gym this night. 

Weight Room open. ..4 to 10 p.m. 

Pool and Dart Tournament in Rec 
Center...? p.m. until finish. 
Thursday, Oct. 23: 

Leagues in play.. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Weight Room open. ..Open Gym. 

Karate class...? to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 

The Racquetball Tournament has 
been postponed until further notice. 

Rollerskating at Skating Plus, 8 to 
1 2 p.m. on November 1 3. Free to all 
students, faculty and staff with 
validated ID. Skates can be rented for 
.50 cents. 



Photo nnagazine 
announces 
annual contest 

Photographers Forum Ivlagazine Is 
offering over $3,400 cash prizes to stu- 
dent photographers this year. 

According to information from Ivls. 
Joann R. Fremiotti. coordinator of Col- 
lege activities, the winning photos will 
be published in the Iv^ay 1 98? issue of 
Photographer's Forum and all finalists 
will be published in the Best of College 
Photography Annual 198?, 

Students may enter as many black 
and white prints, color prints, or slides 
as they wish. 

The subject matter is open. En- 
tries will also be considered for future 
issues of Photographer's Forum 
magazine. 

There will be two grand prizes for 
best color print or slide, and best black 
and white print, two second prizes for 
best color print or slide, and best black 
and white print, two third prizes for best 
color print or slide, and best black and 
white print, and ten fourth prizes for 
best color print or slide, and best black 
and white print. 

There will also be 1 00 honorable 
mention awards -which Include a cer- 
tificate of outstanding merit. 

Entry blanks are available in The 
SPOTLIGHT office. Room ?, 
Academic Center, or in the College Ac- 
tivities Office In the gym. 



BARRY'S 

BROOKLYN STYLE 
EATERY 




i 

ROOMS FOR RENT 

"Save-A-Buck Specials 
Open 'til midnita dally 



M^ 



H Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts 






CompuSource 
Computer Center 

COMPREHENSIVE COMPUTER AND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SERVICES 

COMPUTERIZED WORD PROCESSING 

FAST SERVICE. SPELLING GUARANTEED. 

$1 .30 PER PAGE. REVISIONS HALF-PRICE 

Minimum Fee $5.00 

Rod Millar, President 

(717)327-1423 

416 River Ave., Suite 243, Wiiliamsport, Pa. 17701 



Vandalism less of a problem 
says student services dean 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, Oct. 20, 1986D i 



In the past, vandalism has been 
somewhat of a problem on campus. 
Last year, student dances were no 
longer permitted because of vandalism 
to the restrooms and plants in the 
Lifelong Education Center, according 
to Dr. William J. I^artin. dean of student 
services. 

"Someone even chainsawed one 
of our trees," Dr. Martin said. 
"Everyone should realize that the stu- 
dent activities fee, which all students 
pay, pays for vandalism." 

He added, "in short, the majority 
is hurt by the acts of a minority." 

Dr. Martin said that the situation 
has been somewhat alleviated this 
year, "Maybe students are beginning 



Job Ops 



Information is supplied by the Col- 
lege Placement Office in ttie Learning 
Resources Center: inquiries should be 
directed to that office. 

Quality Inn - Route 1 5-South, has 
openings for waitresses, busboys, 
prep persons and hostesses. Ap- 
plicants should go to front desk to fill 
out application. Part-time. 

Associate degree graduates 
with courses In chemistry - Glyco 
Inc., 3500 Trenton Ave., Williamsport, 
Pa. 1 7701 , will have an opening for a 
quality control laboratory analyst at the 
end of the year. Send a resume to 
Craig Weaver, personnel manager. 
Permanent full-time for December 
graduates. 

New Books 

Five new books available in hard- 
back cover, as listed by Ms. Carla M. 
Home, adult services librarian, James 
V. Brown Library, 19 E. Fourth St., 
downtown Williamsport. 

1 . It - Stephen King, Vinking Press 

2. Wanderlust - Danielle Steel, 
Doubleday Books 

3. Supply of Heroes - James Carrol, 
Dutton Publishers 

4. Suspects - Caunitz Williams, 
Crown Publishers 

5. The Green Train - Herbert Lieber- 
man, Putnam Books 



to realize that we've spent so many 
years trying to overcome the image of 
a dirty-knuckled, dumb old trade 
school," he commented. 

He also commented on the suc- 
cess of the first dance of the year, 
sponsored by the Student Government 
Association on Oct. 8. "The c(ance was 
a success. The fact that there was no 
vandalism stemming from the activity 
shows that our students are beginning 
to care about our facility," he said. 

North Campus 
program to help 
single parents 

College Information Office Report 

The North Campus of the College 
is offering a free program designed to 
help single parents and homemakers 
improve their job skills, build self- 
confidence, cope with stress, manage 
time and money, find a job, and con- 
tinue their education. 

Program services include life skills 
workshops, a network of support ser- 
vices and tuition assistance for training 
programs. 

The first series of life skills 
workshops will be held from today 
through Nov. 26 and will include such 
topics as: 

Communication skills, decision- 
making techniques, building self- 
confidence, coping skills, stress 
management, community rights, time 
and money management, career plan- 
ning, job search skills and vocational 
assessment. 

Free child care is available for par- 
ticipants. 

Information is available by 
telephoning (717) 724-7703. 



Give Blood/It Counts 




Next Week 
^'^ in 

/^ The SPOTLIGHT... 



Grammy Gets the Whammy 
from... *The Men' 



— 3E — 



m Hn IT ■?! 

™™38 IP ™™™ 



T'W^ ~B^^ JTirJT 

n ■tM ^\ — Hr^ 

jB ■■51 ™ 53 5^ 



ACROSS 



1 Pocket the cue ball 
8 Airline company 

14 Beforehand bargain 

15 Large shellfish 

16 Shoots a gun again 

17 Leaves 

16 Lady sheep 

19 Noisy disturbances 

21 Part of NNP 

22 "God's Little ' 

24 Slender fish 

25 Italian seaport 

26 Prearranged fight 

27 Jazz percussion 

29 Arabian seaport 

30 Elinor of the Met 
32 Gershwin piece, for 

34 College courses 



48 German pronoun 

49 tide 

50 Certain lodge 
member 

51 Fur coat material 

55 Wire measure 

56 Press 

58 Solvent ingredient 

60 Incomplete 

61 Holy places 



3 Spor 



offii 



university 
20 Extremely depressed 
2i Type of peach 
25 Low-pitched 

woodwind 
27 Grarmatical 



31 Mr. Khitney 
33 Slangy throw 

35 Sailed 

36 Aaron's speci. 

37 Texas city 
36 Comedian Don 
40 First on the 

(2 wds. 



5 Infield covering 

6 Liz Taylor role, 

7 Red-letter woman 

8 Above; Ger. 

9 Siestas 

10 Longshoreman's 
union (abbr.) 

11 Whirlwind 

12 Became a contest. 



41 Hood or le 
worker 



45 Whip 

51 Created 

52 Employed 

53 Yearn 

54 Type of insi 
57 Ending for 

correspond 
; 59 Mr. Conway 



Crossword Puzzle Brought to You By... 

HAIR CONCEPTS INC. 

300 Shiffler • Triangle Building 
Phone 323-8860 



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IHIEE PIIIA!] 

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Buy any size Little Caesais 
Original round pizza at regular 
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FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GLiNT PLAZA 

327-8600 




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iddldoiitl 10% only wlUi 
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One coupon per customer CarTy out only At participating locations. 



It Cmmi EatovriaM. U 



SaSPOUIOHTDMonday, Oct. 20,1986 




Lynda Sue Shlpman, LPN, Is runnar-up and alternate Nurse of Hope of 
Pennsylvania. According to Ms. Linda Falchsck-Clark, coordinator of the 
College's practical nursing program, and Melissa J. Phillips, 
coordlnator'a aecretary, Ma. Shlpman will aerve aa an official represen- 
tative of the American Cancer Society should the Nurse of Hope not be 
able to fulfill the obligations. In the meanwhile, she will alao be a 
repreaantatlve at various professional, social and community functions. 

[SPOTLIGHT PHOTO / BRENDA M VIBERT] 



CiUo's 

College 

Comer 



PHONE 
322-1321 



IIM W. TUid St. 

(Next 10 

Ike A w d f k Cealer) 



ei^ 



BREAKFAST 

C SPECIAL 
Steak • Cheese * Egg :^v 
Sub 
$1.50 TAX iNCLD Reg. $1.80 

LUNCH SPECIAL 

COLD HAM SUB 

Whole Sub 

$2.85 Txtodudrt Reg. $3.20 

Half Sub 

$1.45T«inci»doi Reg. $1.75 

HOURS* 

Mon. thro Tkin. 

7:30 a.m. lo 6 p.iD. 

FiMay, 7:30 i.m. lo 4 p.a. 



One American dies in an 

alcohol-related accident 

every 35 minates. 



SGA prexy 
issues call 
to students 



Bulletin Board 

D dD Information provided by College Activities Office 
and complied by Brenda M. Vibert, of Ttie SPOTLIGHT Staff 
Week of Monday, Oct. 20 through Sunday, Oct. 28 

MEETINGS 

Alpha Omega Fellowship... 7 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 21, Room 
1 33, Academic Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... noon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 21, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous... 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 22, Room 8107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 21, Room 329, 
Academic Center: general meeting. 

Qovernanca... all participants, 3:30 p.m., today, Monday, Oct. 20, Le 
Jeune Chef. 

Student Government Association... executive meeting, tomorrow, Tues- 
day, Oct. 21, 4 p.m.. Room B107, Lifelong Education Center, open to ex- 
ecutive officers only. 

Student Government Association... Senate meeting, tomorrow, Tuesday, 
Oct. 21, 5 p.m.. Room B107, Lifelong Education Center, open to all students 
and staff. 

CHOICES... lunch-time aeries sponsored by Women's Forum, 11:30 
to 1 p.m., Le Jeune Chef, today, Monday, Oct. 20. 

EVENTS 

Raffle... (Paul Bunyan), Earth Sciences, today, Monday. Oct. 20, through 
next Wednesday, Oct 29; drawing, Wednesday, Oct. 29; $1 donation. 

Stage play... That Championship Season by Jason Miller, presented by 
the Williamsport Players in conjunction with the College: this Friday, Oct. 24, 
and this Saturday, Oct. 25; Both performances at 8 p.m. Tickets from College 
Activities Office in Gym. 

Lecture... CHOICES, sponsored by the Women's Forum- "Knowing Your 
Sexuality". Today, Monday, Oct 20, in Le Jeune Chef, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 
p.m. 

Halloween Message... The SPOTLIGHT Organization sponsors to benefit 
Literacy Project, today, Monday, Oct. 20, in the Academic Center Foyer, and 
in the LEC Lobby, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Graphic Arts Show... bus trip to Graph Expo, Philadelphia Civic Center, 
sponsored by Gamma Epsilon Tau, the College graphic arts fraternity, this 
Wednesday, Oct. 22; bus leaves at 5:30 a.m. for planned 1 a.m. arrival; con- 
tact GET members in basement. Academic Center. 

BLOOOMOBILE... aponsored by the Student Oovernment Association, 
tomorrow, Tueaday, Oct. 21, and Wednesday, Oct. 22, from 9:45 a.m. to 
3:45 p.m. In the Gym. 

Bake Sale... sponsored by Phi Beta Lambda, this Wednesday, Oct. 22, 
from 10 am. to 2 p.m., Academic Center Foyer. 

Roller Skating... Skating Plus, from 8 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Oct. 
23; skate rental is 75 cents. 

Students enrolled In College programs nontradltlonal to their sex... 
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., this Wednesday, Oct. 22, Room B107, Lifelong 
Education Canter. 



William J. Fritz, Student Govern- 
ment Association president, has Issued 
a bid for students to "help out" In cam- 
pus service activities and SGA ac- 
tivities. 

This week, Fritz said, help Is need- 
ed with the visit ol the Bloodmobile. 



Volunteers will be "welcomed" in the 
gym on both days, from 8 a.m.to 4 
p.m. Persons interested in learning 
more about helping at the Bloodmobile 
may contact the SGA Office in the 
Lifelong Education Center. 



.^S;,...- ,,.sren 




GOVERNOR VISITS - Gov. Dick Thornburgh visited the campus last 
Wednesday. Here he chats with Mrs. Kathryn W. Lumley, chairperson of 
the College Board of Trustees, and Dr. Robert G. Bowers, executive assis- 
tant for Internal affairs. SEE STORY, PAGE 4 [spotlight photo /donna l 
TRIMBLE] 



GETTING READY - Students and others gathered to prepare for the first 
meeting, last week, of the Internal Governance Structure. Among them 
were, at left, Mrs. Dale L. Cole, accounting student from Hughesvllle; at 
center background, Mrs. Mary Jo E. Bubb, computer Information systems 
student from Wllllamsport, and William J. Fritz, plumbing and heating stu- 
dent from Homer City. 



SPOTLIGHT 

MoDda;, Oct. 27, 1986 • Vol. 22, No.lO • 8 Pages 
WUIiamiport Am CommDail; Coilete • WUliamiport, Pi. 17701 



SGA meets, reviews programming and needs 



Spring 

Registration 

time nearing 

Class scheduling will be 
held Nov. 10 through 13, from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. In the Academic 
Center Student Lounge, accor- 
ding to Ms. Connie R. Kelsey, 
assistant registrar. 

Returning students are 
reminded to meet with their ad- 
visor this week to pick up 
scheduling books and on-line 
scheduling times, she said. 

Ma. Kelsey sald,'-|| you 
can't meet your scheduled 
ilffle, go to the records 
window." 

ScheduHiit Mines will be 
6:30 to 7:3» ^.m., Nov. 10 
through 13 for thoao etudont* 
with only evontag ciaeses. 

Ula roatolralton will be 
Jen. e. The t urt l u ii has yet to 
be da«ennliiodt Me. Kelsey 
staled. 



WA«i- Ct off' > lo^'K i^pp^c ^ 




THIS IS THE WEEKEND! 



The Student Government 
Association met last Tuesday to 
discuss items such as the need of a 
secretary and student activities pro- 
gramming, according to William J. 
Fritz, SGA president and plumbing and 
healing student from Homer City. 

Fritz said the SGA Is still in need of 
a secretary. That person would be 
responsible for taking minutes at both 
executive and senate meetings, and for 
manning the SGA office several hours 
each w/eek, according to Fritz. 

Fritz staled that the SGA Is in- 
vestigating several possibilities in- 
cluding obtaining a work study student, 
or a student enrolled in the secretarial 
curriculum. 
Activities discussed 

During the meeting, the group also 
discussed possible programming for 
the 1986-87 academic year. Items 
discussed Included a sock hop, a hat 
day, a "good apple, rotten apple" day 
monthly movies, Christmas door 
decorating, rock vkjeos, a lip sync con- 
test, a coffee-house, a spring formal, a 
mardi gras, a balloon sale, a daffodil 
sale, and a cabaret night, among many 
others. 



Ainri Those Clickers! TV Reviewer Gets Zapped! 



Readers Crackle Over Sitcom Put-Down: Page 2 



Zdspoti 



'Catherine has made 
a drastic mistake' 



Viewpoint 



Reader Raaponse 

to Televldon Review 

By Herald L. Holcomb 

Qtnml Studlu Studant, Wllllamiport 

In Catherine Hannon's review (Oct, 
20)she opens with the title "NBC sit- 
coms: Beyond Bellell" Yet in her arti- 
cle she is asking "What other shows 
are they comparing it with," referring to 
the Cosby Show and ALF 

However, she neglects to com- 
pare the sitcoms of ABC and CBS, 
which are no better than those of NBC. 
Catherine says, and I quote, "Life Just 
Isn't like it's represented In these sit- 
coms." and "There are many other 
television shows that are more enter- 
taining and more believable. Because, 
and Catherine will probably agree, 
things In life do not happen from day to 
day as in these shows. 

However, I feel Catherine has 
made a drastic mistake. These sitcoms 
are not designed (I believe) to make us 
sit in our comfortable chairs, in our nice 
warm houses, and wonder why our 
lives are not this way. No, I think these 
shows are designed to let us sit back, 
relax, and enjoy something different. 



whether funny or sad, not to be 
psychoanalyzed as a part of the way 
our lives should be. Furthermore, if 
Catherine Is looking for more in- 
telligence in programs, I wonder how 
often she watches NOVA or The Body 
Human. These shows don't Insult the 
intelligence of people. Yet, they don't 
make us laugh either. 

To conclude: If, Catherine, you 
don't like the sitcoms, well then, get up 
off your comfortable chair and turn the 
television off. No one is twisting your 
arm to watch them, but don't take the 
fun out of it for the rest of us who hap- 
pen to like The Cosby Show or other 
sitcoms. 

And, by the way, you said you get 
the Impression that to be a close fami- 
ly, you can't wear Levis, you have to 
wear designer clothes by Bill Blass. 
Well, It so happens, that I wear Bill 
Blass underwear and my family has 
Just as many problems as someone 
who wears Levis. This means it's not 
the clothes you wear that makes a 
close family, but the amount of love 
you put into It. 



'C'mon, IVIs. Hannon, must we 
see l(nocl(down-drag-outs...?' 



Reader Responae 
■■N^ to Talevlalon Review: 
By Jerry E. Nceee 

Broadcaslino Student, WMIIamtport 

I don't usually write in response to 
TV reviews, but in this case, I've forced 
myself. Catherine Hannon's review of 
NBC sitcoms In the Oct. 20 Issue of 
The SPOTLIGHT needs - in fact, ches 
out - for some sort of rebuttal. 

In writing about the Cosby Show, 
sche complains of the lack ol realism. 
TV, by its very nature, is not real. It's 
fantasy, make-believe. (I would think 
someone in college would know the 
difference.) How could anyone expect 
it to depict realism (whatever that is) 
realistically? 

Ms. Hannon states: "It's main pro- 
blem is that it doesn't show an average 
family." What does she mean by 
"average"? The Huxtable family is ob- 
viously upper-middle class; the father 
is a doctor, the mother is a lawyer - 
two professions which equate (at least 
In my mind) to some money, at least 
enough to raise live kids in a relatively 
nice urban area. There is never any 
mention of this during the course of the 
show; it's a given. Most people would 
be able to figure this out. Are the Hux- 
tables an average family, Ms. Hannon? 

Ms. Hannon complains about the 
Cosby kids, how the parents don't treat 
their children like children, how they 
treat them like (GASPI) equals. How 
should children be treated? like chat- 
tel? The children are allowed to think, 
to not only have an opinion but also 
feel free to express it. If you would 
watch the show (Ms. Hannon), you 
would see that the final arbiters (in any 
decision) are the parents. 

"On the show the kids don't act 
like normal kidsl The perfect 



children. ..well-behaved - rarely 
argue." C'mon, Ms. Hannon, must we 
see knockdown-drag-outs every week 
to satisfy your thirst for "realism"? This 
is not the "Dukes of Hazzard." This is 
"real-life" and in "real-life" as in real 
life, families don't beat up on each 
other every week. If they did, imagine 
the hospital bills. (Of course. If they 
decided to change their format, I guess 
Cosby, the doctor in the family, could 
patch them up.) 

"These kids don't even wear 
JeansMI They wear designer 
clothes!. ..by Bill Blass." We've 
covered the Huxtable' s financial status 
above, and my rebuttal to Ms. Hannon 
is: So what? Regardless of class, kids 
are kids (to coin a phrase), whether 
they wear Levis or Bill Blass. The 
Cosby Show deals with real-life situa- 
tions in an entertaining way. In a TV 
way. Last Thursday's program focus- 
sed on whether one of the daughters 
was old enough to wear make-up or 
not, a clash of wills between mother 
and daughter. Who hasn't in real life, 
had a disagreement with their parents? 
Ms. Hannon? 

If all this unduly harsh, generaliz- 
ed, criticism wasn't enough, Ms. Han- 
non attacks the youngest member of 
the Cosby family, Rudy. "She oozes 
sweetness... like Karo syrup. I'd love to 
do something to upset her., like cutting 
off one of her three braids. This would 
give us an opportunity to see if she can 
act..." What's wrong with you Ms. Han- 
non? Don't you like kids? I would say 
Rudy is a lot more convincing an ac- 
tress than "Punky Brewster". She's 
playing herself in a convincing way, 
delivering her lines and not running into 
the furniture. Loosen up a little. 



Crossing West Third... 
Russian Roulette? 

The SPOTLIGHT commenta 

We recently had the misfortune of witnessing a friend trying to play Rus- 
sian Roulette with a ton of steel. 

Crossing West Third Street may not be on your list of things that excite 
you, but if your doctor has said Increase your heart rate, then this is the past- 
time for you. 

Our friend just wasn't thinking or watching very well. We all know that we 
should look both ways before crossing the street. But, do we know that NO 
ONE has the right of way when it concerns life or death? Luckily our friend Just 
had a bad scare and wasn't seriously injured. 

Traffic has the signal light at the corner and the students were given a 
crosswalk a few feet away from that. This doesn't mean traffic has to stop 
when we are using the crosswalk; It just means that we can get across there 
and not get a ticket for Jaywalking. 

Some drivers stop when they see us in the area. However, we wouldn't 
want to test their stopping power with our bodies in case they weren't paying 
attention. 

We want to stay healthy and active. We go on diets and go to excerise 
classes. We do all the right things to be the picture of health. 

So why can't we think healthy? Don't get your exercise by dodging the 
cars on West Third Street. Get it by walking the extra few feet to the corner. 

"Stand by Me" One of the best 



Movie review by Llaa R. Lumbard 
Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

"Stand by Me," a film directed by 
Rob Reiner, is touted by most critics as 
one of the best of the year. I tend to 
agree. 

The film, adapted from a Stephen 
King short story ("The Body", Different 
Seasons), portrays four young boys 
who walk a long cisiance to rino me 
body of an allegedly dead teenager. 

Although this is the main plot of 
the story, deeper themes and hidden 
meanings lie within the conversations 
between the boys. During their adven- 



turous Journey, the boys discover one 
another's fears of growing up, and the 
maturity each has already acquired. 

The film also has lighter moments, 
particularly mishaps encountered with 
an elderly Junkyard owner, and a scene 
when, while swimming, the boys 
emerge from the water covered with 
leeches. 

Reiner has come a long way since 
his television sitcom days. He has pro- 
ven his real talent lies in directing mo- 
tion pictures - if this enjoyable, moving 
film is any indication. 



Impressions... 

The new literary/art/photography magazine 

welcomes student, faculty, and stqff submissions 

Deadline for submissions: November 17 

Drop Off: SPOTLIGHT Office, 

Room 7, Lower Level, Academic Center 

Fall 1986 Issue to be Available the Week of Dec. 2 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Oct. 27, 1986 - Vol. 22, No.10 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday morning of the academic year except for 
College vacations, by journalism and other Interested students ol The Willlamsport Area 
Community College. 

Office; Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W, Third St., Williamsporl Pa 17701 
Telephone (7171 326 3761, Extension 7533, 



Opin 



_, s expressed are those of the student newspaper or ol those whose names ac- 
company items Opinions do not reflect official opinion of the Institution. 

The SPOTLIGHT Is a member ol 
the Columbia Scholastic Press Association 

STAFF 

Kathy L, Cobb, Managing Editor, Brenda M. Vlberl, Associate Editor: Oonna L Trimble 
Photography Editor: Michael Waldron, Advertising Director: Usa R. Lumbard Chiel Com- 
posllor: Marge M. DINardo. Production Manager 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSISTANTS 

Catherine A. Hannon. Ruth Ann Hlxson. Marc A Varano, Todd A. Patterson Janine M 
Sullivan, Diane L. Shaheen. Angela S, SIpe. and Margie E. Flanagan 

Contrlbullns Faculty Advlur Antliany N. Clllo, associate prolessor ol lournallsm- 

The SPOTLIGHT grstetully acknowledges the assistance ol 
Dale L Metzger. associate prolessor of graphic arts 



Community Ed Lecture Series 
to feature healtli-related topics; 
first (diabetes) is tliis evening 



SPOTLIGHTDMoada;, (kl. 27, 19Si d3 



Collegs Information Office 

The College's Center for Lifelong 
Education Is offering a free Communi- 
ty Education Lecture Series - starting 
ttiis evening - wtiich deals with health- 
related topics. 

Divine Providence Hospital is co- 
sponsoring the series. All sessions will 
be held in Room 122, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center, City Campus. 
Diabetes topic tonlglit 

Opening the series will be a pro- 
gram on diabetes at 7 p.m. tonight. Dr. 
Robert li^elis, medical director of the 
hospital's diabetes center, will be the 
featured speaker. 

In November, there will be pro- 
grams on osteoporosis, breast cancer 
and mammography, and chronic lung 
disease. 
On Thursday, Nov. 6 

Osteopososis will be featured on 
Thursday, Nov. 6. Dr. John Caice, 
director of nuclear medicine; Dr. Keith 
Shenberger, arthritis and rheumatology 
specialist, and Rhonda Bird, a 
registered dietitian, will speak. 
Nov. 1 3: breast cancer 

On Thursday, Nov. 13, Dr. Har- 
shad Patel. director of radiology, and 

Director, instructor 
speak at WAHS 

Dr. Donald B. Bergerstock, direc- 
tor of the Business and Computer 
Technologies Division, and John W. 
Miller, connputer science instructor, 
were guest speakers at the Lycoming 
County In-Service Day held at the 
Williamsport Area High School. 

Their presentation, "Opportunities 
for Excellence" was an update about 
the "state of the art technologies and 
curriculum offerings at the College", 
the director said. 

Dr. Bergerstock also spoke about 
new technologies in the Health 
Science Center. He also noted that the 
Oct. 1 in-service day was very well at- 
tended. He said many questions about 
the College's technology offerings 
were asked. 



BARRY'S 

BROOKLYN STYLE 
EATERY 




ROOMS FOR RENT 

"Save-A-Buck Specials 
Open 'til midnlta dally 



Dr. David Nagel. oncology specialist, 
will speak on breast cancer and mam- 
mography. 

Chronic lung disease will be the 
topic of Dr. Michael Green, 
puimonology specialist, on Thursday, 
Nov. 20. 

The sessions each are at 7 p.m. 

CLE personnel are asking those 
interested to register for the sessions. 
To register, those interested may call 
the Center for Lifelong Education at 
327-4769 during the day or 327-4768 
in the evenings. Registrations, accor- 
ding to a CLE announcement, should 
be completed one week prior to the 
session. 

SportsCard 

Today: 

Karate class. '7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym 

Weight Room open.. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Mid Semester volleyball league 
starts 
Tomorrow, Oct. 28: 

Karate class. .7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 

Weight Room open. ..4 to 10 p.m. 

Anyone interested in 3 on 3 
basketball to practice for Schick Super 
Hoop see Margot Bayer in Room 209 
(Gym). 

Leagues in play. .4 to 10 p.m. 
Wednesday, Oct. 29: 

No open Gym this night. 

Weight Room open.. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Karate class.. .7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 
Thursday, Oct. 30: 

Karate class. .7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 

Weight Room open. ..4 to 10 p.m. 

Badmitton League forming. 
Anyone interested can pick up rosters 
in the REC Center. 

Ruby K. Hayes 
attends session 

Miss Ruby K. Hayes, assistant 
professor of business administration, 
viewed the latest textbooks and equip- 
ment from publishers and venders, and 
heard business education leaders and 
representatives from business and in- 
dustry during a recent trip to Cherry 
Hill, N.J., from Friday, Oct. 10 to Sun- 
day, Oct. 12. 

Bob Moore, educator, speaker, 
and author of Personal Motivation, was 
the keynote speaker for the Business 
Education Conference. 

Some of the workshops Miss 
Hayes attended were "Networking: Us- 
ing the Microcomputer to Teach Infor- 
mationWord Processing," and "Net- 
working: Business Communication 
What! Howl When! 

Miss Hayes also toured the Camp- 
bell Soup Company. 

Miss Hayes said, "I try to go each 
year. It is a motivating factor to keep 
you in touch with what is new. You get 
to interact with people of other states, 
and I feel this is important. 




MOVIN' RIGHT ALONG - Progress on the Professional Development 
Center continues. Kirk J. Schilling, service and operation of heavy con- 
struction equipment student from Altoona, gets advice from Benjamin H. 
Eldred, assistant professor of S&O. Schilling Is working on PDC landscap- 
ing. [SPOTLIGHT PHOTO I DONNA L. TmMBLE] 
^ •*•••••••••••••••••••• ^ 



The 
Williamsport Area Community College 



FIRST ANNUAL 



CALENDA] 



Contest 



M 

M 
M 

M 

¥ 

M ••••••••••••••••••••••* 



Attention artists! 

Tht College is sponsonng a calendar ai 
community. . 

We are searching for an original pen-and-ink drawing from among 
and staff. The winning entry will receive both prize money and publicat 
calendar. 



be open to all members of the College 



GRAND PRIZE $100 



You need not be an established artist or have a parlieulat "style". All that is required is a 
ability to draw neatly and accurately in pen and ink. 

This year's subject is The Academic Center 

Deadline for entries is November 3, 1986 

This is a juried competition and ci 
list of rules, visit ihe College Information Oflice o 
Center. 

Good Luck! 



4DSPOTLICHTDMon(tay. Ocl. 27, 1986 

No show for class could mean 
no financial aid $, director warns 

A warning for students in eight-week courses has been issued by the 
director ot financial aid, Donald S. Shade. 

If you cut or H you withdraw... You might lose financial aid eligibility says 
a Shade announcement. 

"Students beginning second eight-week courses are reminded that the 
class they are beginning has already been included in the total number of 
credits needed to maintain financial aid eligibility," states the announcement. 

"Therefore, students who do not show up for their second eight-week 
courses or who withdraw from them may become ineligible for aid which has 
already been awarded to them. 

"Students who are in this situation should contact the Financial Aid Office 
as soon as possible," Shade added, "to determine the effects of such action 
on their eligibility for financial aid. 



Gramma goes 
gung-ho for 'Hunko 



...As she lived it, she wrote it: 
An adventure in changing Social Customs., 
OR: 

Does the Jungle still beat In these 
civilized (if aging) hearts? 




WELCOME BACKI - Dr. John F. Thompson, associate academic dean, was 
welcomed back on the Job last week alter undergoing surgery. The gorilla 
refused to give Its name, describing Itself only as a "real swinger". 

[SPOTLIGHT PHOTO / DONNA L TRIMBLE] 



Governor visits campus 



"I've got a friend In 
Wllllamsport," Governor Dick Thorn- 
burgh said last Wednesday whan he 
announced that a pilot program 
started six years ago this month was 
a success. Qovernor Thornburgh 
visited the campus to discuss the 
project known as "CLIME" - the 
Cllnton-Lycoming Industrial 
Marketing Effort. CLIME was a part- 
nership between the Economic 
Development Committee (EDC) ot 
Thornburgh's cabinet and local, 
state and federal officials. Through 
"CLIME" the unemployment rate for 



this area has dropped from 14.9 per- 
cent In 1980 to 6.1 percent, bringing 
us below the statewide level of 6.3 
percent and the national rate of 6.7 
percent. The governor toured the 
new $15 million Advance 
Technology and Health Sciences 
Center. 

"This center Is a direct 
response to the Important role ad- 
vanced technology and our educa- 
tional Institutions are playing In the 
revltallzatlon of the state's 
economy," stated Thornburgh. 



A SPOTLIGHT SPECIAL REPORT 
By Donna L. Trimble 
Photography Editor 



The writer Is, indeed, a grandmother 
- of 1 - who long ago declared her 
own Woman's Bill of Rights. (Her 
husband will kill her tor that com- 
ment, of course, but It's all lor the 
lun ol It, right? Right?!?l? Ri,r,L..) 



Job Ops 

This intoimation is provided by the 
College Placement Oflice in the Learn- 
ing Resources Center. Inquiries should 
be directed to that oftice. 




Hickory Farms In the Lycoming 
Mall needs a computer student to work 
every day beginning before Thanksgiv- 
ing until after Christmas Inputing gift 
orders. Would need to work about 
three hours prior to closing: lutonday 
through Saturday until 1 p.m., Sunday 
until 6 p.m. Total of 25-30 hours a 
week. Apply at store. Must be fast and 
accurate. $3.50 an hour. 

Burger King has openings nation- 
wide for managers on military bases. 
Applications can be picked up In the 
Advisement Center. 

Hess's Department Store in the 
Lycoming Mall has openings for securi- 
ty guards starting Nov. 1 through Dec. 
24. Hours: 5:30 to 9:30 seven days a 
week. Pay rate is $4.50 an hour. Call 
PInkerton Security Systems collect: 
Pll) 233-6447. 



Bogert Precast, Industrial Park, 
Williamsport, has an opening for a stu- 
dent to take concrete tests part time. 
Apply to Mr. Miller at the plant. 



St. Luke's United Church of 
Christ, 1175 W. Fourth St., Lock 
Haven, Pa 1 7745 has an opening for a 
youth director 2'/2-3 days per week, in- 
cluding Sundays. Must have youth 
leadership experience and skill, be 
comfortable and articulate In discuss- 
ing your spiritual faith and have ex- 
cellent references. Contact the Church. 



Sheraton Inn has an immediate 
opening for a busboy five or six even- 
ings per week. Call Mike Hamilton at 
327-8231 after 4:30 p.m. 



Permanent Employment 

The Joint Apprentice Committee 
of the Sheet Metal Workers Local No. 
44 of N. E. PA will be accepting ap- 
plications for apprenticeships in the 
Sheet Metal trade. Age 17-26. Must 
reside in Lycoming, Montour, Snyder, 
Union, Potter or Tioga Counties. Ap- 
plication forms may be obtained at Job 
Service Office, 1300 Sheridan St., 
Williamsport, PA 17701 Monday 
through Friday, Oct. 27, through 31 . 

Dr. Bergerstock 
speaks at meeting 
of realtors 

Dr. Donald B. Bergerstock, direc- 
tor of the Business and Computer 
Technologies Division was the speaker 
at the September meeting of the 
Lycoming County Board of Realtors. 

His topic was training on personal 
computers for realtors. This dealt with 
the utilization of microcomputers in the 
real estate business. 

Dr. Bergerstock also spoke about 
the various one-credit courses at the 
College, including word processing, 
data base for microcomputers, and 
microcomputers spreadsheets. 



SPOTLIGHTDMoadiT, Oct. 27, 19M oS 



The entertainment for my offspr- 
ing's coming of age party was left to 
me. Being of sound, iascivious mind, I 
immediately thought of the Bourbon 
Street Night Club. I knew that on her 
21st natal day ,"The Men" would be 
performing there. 

"What! You don't l<now what that 
group is? Let me edjacate ya honey!" 

Picture a hot, dim room with 300 
screaming women, mentally surging 
towards a stage with five near-nal(ed 
men cavorting in rhythm to the latest 
jungle beat. It's enough to give 
"Cheetah" hot flashes. (You remember 
Cheetah? Tarzan's monkey sidekick...) 
THEY GET RESTLESS 

The show was supposed to start 
at 9 p.m. sharp. By 9:03 p.m. the 
natives were getting restless. By 9;05 
p.m. the owners realized they had a 
near riot on their hands, and as soon as 
I promised to step down off the bar, 
they promised to start the show. 

As the first performer - dressed as 
a clown strutted across the stage to 
the tune of "The Entertainer" he teased 
and tantalized all of us with a slow 
removal of fabric which left us to 



believe he wasn't clowning around. 

Left with nothing on but a pouch 
tied to a stnng, he then introduced us 
to an ancient rite of magic. As he 
neared individuals, dollars were whisk- 
ed out of mouths, bras and waist bands 
of women into the mouths and 
g-strings of the dancers. In exchange 
for this we received a picture of him 
and wonderful fantasies 
DOWN IN A FLURRY 

The man at the cash register went 
down in a flurry of tens and twenties as 
we rushed him to exchange them for 
one dollar bills. Come to think of it, his 
left pants pocket is probably where I 
lost my left shoe. 

The next couple of dancers had us 
panting with lust until the feature of the 
night - "Hunko" - came on. As 
"Hunko" gyrated around and start his 
hip bumps and grinds, he got the fringe 
on his g-string doing very strange 
things while the rest of his body re- 
mained motionless. If I tried that I'd be 
in traction with a dislocated pelvis. 

As he leaped from the stage to 
sway on tables, chairs, and ladies laps 
for dollar bills, the noise level reached 



7'/2 on the Richter Scale. "Hunko" 
handed out roses sprinkled with his 
aftershave - a subtle hint that keeps 
him foremost in our fantasies. 
GRAMMY GETS THREE 

Since I managed to garner three 
roses through sheer determination and 
a lot of shoving - (I'm sure the girl's in- 
surance will cover her dislocated hip) 
-you will understand when I say he 
was "primo." 

The last dancer was dressed as a 
woman. It was very disconcerting to 
see some guy in drag that looked bet- 
ter than the girls in the audience. 

At last, it was over and my 
daughter and I would have plenty of 
memories of a fun night at the local 
strip joint for women. But I had to get 
home to rest, so I could get to the bank 
early enough to cash my Social Securi- 
ty check. Atter all, "The Men" will be 
back in a month and I have to make 
reservations for next time. 

The manager has promised to let 
me have a chair to sit on. 

1 wonder if I should double up on 
my Geritol dosage... ? 




Governance Structure 
has first official meeting 



BY KATHY L. COBB 
Of The SPOTLIQHT StaH 

The first official meeting of the In- 
ternal Governance Structure was held 
last Monday in Le Jeune Chef, the 
student-operated restaurant, in the 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College 
president, addressed the group, 
stating, "I'm sure you will collectively 
arrive at decisions in the best interest 
of the institution, making it a better 
place for people who attend today, 
tomorrow, and in the years to come. I 
look forward to the fruits of your labor." 

Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, chairper- 
son of the College Council, addressed 
communication formats, a Governance 
logo, and advertisement of meetings. 

During the meeting, individual 

New Books 

Five new non-fiction books are 
now available according to Ms. Caria 
M. Home, adult services librarian at the 
James V. Brown Library, 1 9 E. Fourth 
St., Williamsport. 

1. "Arab and Jew: Wounded 
Spirits in a Promised Land." - David 
Shipler. 

2. "Be Happy You Are Loved." 
- Robert Schuller. 

3. "His Way." - Kitty Kelley, a 
biography of Frank Sinatra. 

4. "Mayflower Madam" 
-Sydney Biddle Barrows. 

5. "The Story of English." 
-Robert McCrum. 



committees and the College Council 
met for the first time. The primary obi- 
jective of this first meeting was to set 
up a date for another meeting, and to 
discuss objectives. 

Mrs. Muzic specified that the Col- 
lege Library, LRC, will be the official 
repository for the Governance Struc- 
ture. 

"All Governance documents, in- 
cluding agendas, minutes, and recom- 
mendations will be available to the 
public," she said. 

Ninety-four individuals, represen- 
ting a cross-section of the campus are 
involved in the structure, including 83 
representatives of faculty, staff and ad- 
ministration, and 1 1 students. 

The structure is a decision-making 
system, in which committees, dealing 
with issues such as curriculum, 
academic standards and issues, 
human resources, student affairs, and 
long range planning, evaluate and 
make recommendations to the Coun- 
cil. 

The Council acts as an umbrella 
structure, examining all recommenda- 
tions before submitting them to the Col- 
lege president. 

Mrs. Muzic said all scheduled 
meetings of the Council and commit- 
tees will be announced in future issues 
of the SPOTLIGHT and New Week 
News. 

Refreshments at the first meeting 
were provided by secondary voca- 
tional students in the food and 
hospitality program. 




TONIGHT 



6DSPOTlJCHTDMo,.d.,,Ocl27,m« B lOOCl IV Ob I lO H OtS 350 

Goldfeder to speak at leadership pj^f^ during campus visit 
event at Lock Haven University '^ 



Paul W. Goldfeder, Phi Beta (rom Wllliamsport; Shelley A. Stover, 

Lambda state adviser, will speak to parliamentarian and general studies 

students of the Management Science student from the Jersey Shore area; 

Club at Lock Haven University Campus and Doug D- Schreffler, state 

tomorrow. parliamentarian and advertising art stu- 

Goldfeder will address students at dent from Sunbury. 

the Robinson Learning Center, and According to Goldfeder. PBL is 

John Tighe, president of the Manage- the largest organization on campus, 

ment Science Club will present the In- and the only Nationally Affiliated 

troduction. Fraternity on campus. "There are five 

Goldfeder will also speak at The regions of PBL in the United States and 

Eastern National Fall Leadership Con- we have the largest state membership 

ference to be held at the Hilton Hotel, In In the Eastern Region." 

Syracuse, N.Y,, this Friday, Saturday, Phi Beta Lambda fraternity 

and Sunday, according lo Goldfeder. members will hold a movie night and 

Also speaking at the conference meeting at Goldfeder's home this 

will be Martin T. Green, PBL president, Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. He said he is 

and business management student urging all members to attend. 



SGA reps 
give student 
'welcome back' 

Two Student Government 
Association representatives 
welcomed back a student recent- 
ly Injured when a car on which he 
was working fell on him. 

Last Tuesday, SGA presi- 
dent William J. Fritz and Senator 
Daniel R. Partsch welcomed 
back Charles F. Zeniz, a diesel 
mechanics student from Old 
ZIonsvllle. 

Zentz returned to classes 
last Monday after a short stay at 
the Wllliamsport Hospital. 

Fritz Is a plumbing and 
heating student from Homer City. 
Partsch Is a diesel technology 
student from SIdman. 



Three hundred and fifty pints of Cross, said. " The Red Cross had dif- 
ficulty everyday in obtaining blood. 
People are afraid of getting AIDS from 



blood were donated during last week's 
Bloodmoblle visit, according to Ms. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, College activities giving blood.' 



coordinator. 

Ms. Fremiotti said that of the 388 
Individuals who volunteered to donate 



She also said that to keep up with 
demand, it is Imperative that the Red 
Cross obtain 450 pints of blood per 



blood, 38 were deferred for reasons day. 



such as colds or sore throats. 

Ms. Sandra L. Rhone, SGA ad- 
viser, noted, "The Bloodmobile is a 
community service project sponsored 
In part by the Student Government 
Association." 

The goal for last week's Blood- 
mobile was to obtain 400 pints of 
blood. Ms. Haliie H. Luppert, blood ser- 
vice coordinator for the Lycoming 
County Chapter of the American Red 




Organ donation 
topic on Wednesday 



"Organ Donation: The Gift of Life" 
will be the topic of a community educa- 
tion lecture to be held this Wednesday 
at the North Campus of the College. 

The lecture Is being ottered free of 
charge and Is being sponsored by the 
Center for Lifelong Education at the 
North Campus and the Delaware 
Valley Transplant Program. 

As technology has advanced to 
today's level of achievement, organ 



IT DOESN'T HURT, REALLY - Angela S. Slpa, a lournallsm student from 
Lock Havan, prova* giving blood Isn't as painful as aoma might think. Sha 
was ona of the donora during last week's Bloodmoblle visit on campus. 

(SPOTLIGHT PHOTO / DONNA L. THIMBLE] — li ■■_ * Krt t 

Special Courses 

The SPOTLIGHT invites in- 
structors to submit reviews of 
special or new courses to be ot- 
tered next semester. [See Page 
7] The reviews will be included 
in a presentation next week. 
Typewritten material of approx- 
imately 100 words should be 
delivered or sent to The 
SPOTLIGHT, Room 7, Academic 
Center. BEFORE NOON 
TOMORROW. 



procurement and transplantation was 
given thousands of people across the 
country the gift of life, allowing in- 
dividuals to enjoy normal productive 
lives with new kidneys, livers and 
hearts, according to Mrs. Susan W. 
Sweet, coordinator of community and 
business programming at the North 
Campus. 



The SGA sponsors the Blood- 
mobile once every semester. 

Forum liolds 
discussion 

The Women's Forum held a 
presentation, "Knowing Your Sexuali- 
ty" last Monday, Oct. 20 from 11:30 
a.m. to 1 p.m. in Le Jeune Chef. 
Lifelong Education Center. 

The presentation panel consisted 
of Ms. Sharon K. Heitsman, coor- 
dinator of career exploration in non- 
traditional occupations: Ms. Kathryn 
Ferrence, counselor; Janet A. Barbour, 
health instructor; and Thomas A. Zim- 
merman, human service/social science 
instructor. 

The panel discussed topics such 
as dating, sexuality, and various 
aspects of human relationships. They 
also discussed the opinions and ideas 
of the students, faculty and staff that at- 
tended. 

Nursing 
students help 
in screening 

Four nursing students assisted In 
the hunter's health screening at Divine 
Providence Hospital last Wednesday, 
Oct. 8, according to Mrs. Jacquelynne 
D. Ellis, associate professor of nursing. 

Marlene J. Mitchell, of Castanea. 
David M. George, of Elysburg; Mary E. 
Seagraves, of Wllliamsport; and 
Pamela J. Saylor, of Lock Haven, par- 
ticipated In the event, Mrs. Ellis said. 

The second and third semester 
students ran tracings for EKGs. 

The purpose of the event was to 
determine possible health problems for 
hunters. 

Two hundred and fifty-eight 
hunters were screened, Mrs. Ellis said. 



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A 



CouEOE News 
Highlights 



SPOTUGHTaMoidi;, Oct. 27, IHt D i 



■(>■<>* 



TRANSFERRING? 

"Students are encouraged to 
visit the colieges to whicti they 
are Interested in transferring," 
said Thomas C. Shoff. Coliege 
transfer counselor, last week. He 
said colleges usually have an 
open house for prospective 
students. Info: Shoff, Room 157, 
Learning Resources Center. 

* « <r 
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Professor Lynda Icochea, 
director of the Center for Interna- 
tional and Intercultural Education 
at Bergen County Community 
College, New Jersey, is to visit 
the College today to meet with 
various groups involved with the 
College's international education 
project. 

•* A ii 
WOMEN'S CHRISTMAS PARTY 

W.A.C.C. Women Christmas 
party is set for Tuesday, Dec. 9. 
Info and reservationsJane Miles 
at College Ext. 7562 or Bea 
Hllliard at College Ext. 7305. 



•ii -it -i: 
DEADLINE FOR ART ENTRIES 

Deadline for entries in this 
year's Calendar Art Contest Is a 
week from today. Official rules 
available at tf)e Coliege Informa- 
tion Office, second floor, Lifelong 
Education Center. [See an- 
nouncement. Page 3]. 
■Cr ir it 



NAME CHANGED 

"New Horizons" is the new 
name for the program heretofore 
entitled "career guidance and 
vocational training for single 
parents and homemakers", ac- 
cording to Cheri Hilton, coor- 
dinator. lnfo:College Ext. 7449. 

ii -d it 
RACE SCHEDULED NOV. 2 

The Greater Williamsport 
Running Club in cooperation with 
the Williamsport Recreation 
Commission will present the Se- 
cond Annual 10K Run on Sun- 
day, Nov. 2. Info: 327-7530. 



Still Splattering the Walls... 

...after 1 years. Masters of Horror, ENL 251-01 , is a humanities elective 
which explores the serious treatment of horror by authors from the 1 7th Cen- 
tury to modern times - including Shakespeare, Shelley, Poe, Lovecraft, King, 
and Bradbury. 

The course examines the comic book from the earlier forerunners of the 
horror genre to the controversial tulcCarthy Era E.G. horror line which was 
ultimately banned from distribution. 

The course also focuses upon the treatment of horror in the mass media 
including radio horror shows and the evolution of the horror film from silent 
classics to modern masters including George Romero, David Cronenberg, 
Herschel Gordon Lewis and Wes Craven. 

A special unit is devoted to women in horror. 

The course meets Monday-Wednesday-Friday from 1 1 a.m. to noon and 
is taught by Dr. Peter B. Dumanis. ENL 111 or ENL 711 is a rerequisite which 
may be waived with permission of the instructor. 



HAPPY HAU<N 



p,«e^ BOOKSTORE 



P. 



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on minimum purchase 

of *3." or more -textbooks 

excluded from sale 



Tritk US5 and 
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(available at time of purchase) 



HAPPY HAUNTINC, 




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5 Flower containi 
9 Former French 

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47 Pointed mining tools 

49 Racket 

50 Element datun 
(abbr.) 

51 Open-mouthed 
53 Shoshonean 



13 Pertorm like a 
magnet 

14 Legal proceedings 

16 Overwhelms 

17 Prefix: three 

19 Flower part 

20 Water cooler need 
Zl Achilles' murderer 

23 Prefix; half 

24 Yoko 

25 Harbors for yachts 

27 room 

28 Stretching muscle* 
30 Jim Thorpe's school 
32 Sandarac tree 

34 Pi 



54 

55 Hithdn 






state- 



35 Ransom victims 
39 Spain and Portugal 

43 Peer Gynt's mother 

44 Mailer and Thomas 
46 Third most coffinon 



57 Put into action 

59 Boil 

60 "Pete and " 

61 Member of former 
show-biz couple 

62 Part of many 
phones 

DOWN 

1 Get going (2 wds. 

2 Fixes 

3 Lupine and Cantor 

4 Twitch 

5 Morrow or Wertz 

6 Bible book 

7 Had winter fun 

8 Gretna Green 
visitors 



11 "Our Gang" member, 
et al. 

12 Tooth part 

13 Type of tie 
15 Golf shot 

18 Early explorer 

21 Park 

22 Canned fish 
25 Actress Erin 



31 I like 

33 Bypass 

35 Mother of Ishmael 

36 Indians or oranges 

37 Calmed 

38 Destroyed (obs.) 

40 Deep sea fish 

41 Inherent 

42 Worship 

45 "Take " 

48 Binge 

50 Bird feathers 

52 Food 

54 Gudrun's king 

56 Antepenult 



tter 



58 "El 



collegiate crossword 



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THE. » 
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PHONE 327-1766 



SoSPOTUCHTDMondir, Oct. 27. 1M6 



Dance to be this Thursday, , 

A Halloween dance, sponsored by WWAS, the Colleges student- 
operated FM radio station, will be held this Thursday from 9 to 11 p.m. 

The dance will be held In the Susquehanna Room. 

Admission will be $1 lor those in costume and $1.50 for those without 
costumes, according to Miss Theresa M. Ronen. general manager and broad- 
casting student from Montoursville. 

Miss Ronen said there will be prizes for the most original, funniest, and 
scariest costumes. Fortune tellings will be available for $1 

Music will be simulcast live from WWAS 

Continued from Page /■■■ 

Student Government 



Fritz also said that SGA commit- 
tee recruitment is still underway, and 
he said he Is encouraging all students 
to become Involved. 

"We cannot have a strong SGA 
without strong committees," he slated. 
Qat Involved, ha says 

In particular, Fritz urged students 
to become Involved with SGA spon- 
sored events such as the Bloodmobile, 
which was held in the Gymnasium last 
Tuesday and Wednesday 

"Students who give blood or 
volunteer to help carry biood or escort 
donors provide service to both the Col- 
lege and the community," he said. 

Also during the meeting, 
Stephanie L. Sewesky, chairperson of 
the programming committee, and 
general studies student from Selln- 
sgrove, commented on SGA's par- 
ticipation In the Oct. 1 9 Crop Walk for 
Hunger. 

She said, "Three SGA reps 
-Janice Appleton, Lisa Stephenson, 
and myself - walked for SGA. We 
completed 1 miles, while the Lycom- 



ing College students only walked three 
miles." 

Miss Appleton is a secretarial stu- 
dent from Towanda. Miss Stephenson 
is a retail management student from 
Towanda. 
Maatlngs on Tuasday 

The SGA meets regularly in Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center. The 
Executive Committee meets every 
Tuesday at 4 p.m., and is open only to 
officers. 

The Senate meeting is held bi- 
monthly, on alternate Tuesdays at 5 
p.m. 'The meeting is open to all 
students, staff and faculty. 



CiUo's 

College 

Comer 



PHONE 
322-1321 



UN W. TIM St. 

(Ncitio 

Ik AcadMk Cnter) 



Government Surplus 

Military Clothing 

// Equipment 

Appalachian Outfitters 

15 East Water Street 

Muncy, PA 17772 



Monday - 

Friday 

Saturday 



Thursday 



9-7 
9-9 
10-5 



I Phone 717-546-8296 

I 1. ^ t 



BULLETIN BOARD 

Information provided by College Activities Office and compiled by Brenda 
M. VIbert, of the SPOTLIGHT Staff. 
Waek of Monday Oct. 27 through Sunday, Nov. 2 
MEETINGS 

Student Government Budget Committee Meeting.. .4 p.m. .today. Room 
8107. Lifelong Education Center. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship.. .7 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 28, Room 
133, Academic Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau...noon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 28, Room B107. 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous.. .7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 29, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Government Association. ..executive meeting tomorrow, Oct. 28, 
4 p.m.. Room B1 07, Lifelong Education Center, open to executive officers on- 
ly 

Phi Beta Lambda. .7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 29, at the home of adviser 
Paul Goldfeder. All members are urged to attend this meeting and movie night. 

Women's Forum. .7:30 to 9 a.m., Thursday, Oct. 30, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. This is an informal meeting open to anyone in- 
terested. Welcome to bring breakfast. 

Internal Governance System College Council, 3:50 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 
30, Room 120, Building Trades Center. 
Events 

Raffle... (Paul Bunyan), Earth Sciences, today. Monday. Oct. 27, through 
this Wednesday, Oct. 29: drawing, Wednesday. Oct. 29: $1 donation. 



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STUDENT PUBLICATION • WILLIAMSPOHT A R E A C O M M U N I T Y C O L L E G E 

SPOTLIGHT 

M0NDAY*N0VEMBER3, 1986 •VOL. 2 2, NO. 11 • 8PAGES 



College Council 
elects officers 

The Internal Governance Structure Council and committees met in- 
dividually last week to elect officers, establisfi guidelines, and begin work on 
objectives. 

Elected to ttie College Council were: 

Carl L. Christiansen, director of computer services, vice chairperson. 

Patricia M. Baldwin, manager of the Word Processing Center, secretary. 
Committee chairpersons: 

Jane R. Miles, secretary to the dean of development, Human Resources 
Committee. 

Harry C. Specht, assistant professor of physical education. Curriculum 
Committee. 

James E. Logue, associate professor of English, Long Range Planning 
Committee. 

Alex W. Bailey, professor of business administration. Academic Stan- 
dards and Issues Committee. 

Thomas A. Zimmerman, instructor, human services/social science. Stu- 
dent Affairs Committee. 

Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, professor of English, was elected to serve as 
chairperson to the College Council in a College-wide election held in August. 



Governance 
student reps 
to meet 

The 1 1 student representatives in 
the Internal Governance System will at- 
tend an orientation meeting this week, 
according to Dr. Jeannette L. Eraser, 
dean of educational research, planning 
and evaluation. 

Dr. Eraser said two meeting are 
set up to accomodate the students' 
schedules. The first meeting will be 
held from 9 to 11 a.m., tomorrow in 
Room 220, Lifelong Education Center. 

The second meeting will be held 
from 4 to 6 p.m., this Wednesday in 
Room 220, LEC. 

Dr. Eraser said the students would 
be addressed by Mrs. Veronica M. 
Ivluzic, chairperson of the College 
Council, and by herself, on issues such 
as an overview of the College ad- 
ministrative system, identification of 
issues facing students and how to most 
effectively work within the framework 
of their individual committees. 

The College Council and Gover- 
nance committees met in individual 
meetings last week to discuss 
organizational procedures. 

City to levy 
'W.A.C.C. tax' 

Willlamsport Mayor Stephen 
LucasI this week presented a pro- 
posed city budget in which was 
included a tax hike which he said 
was to support the College. 

The new tax would be on 
real estate. 



Courses listed 

Some of the new course or 
special course offerings for the 
Spring Semester are reviewed on 
Page 3. 

This listing represents sub- 
missions for publications. For ad- 
ditional information, students 
may refer to the Schedule of 
Classes. -Ed. 




Your Vote Has Power to Move the World 

Tomorrow's Election Day 



College exceeds quota jn United Way 



The College raised $10,304.94 in 
this year's campaign for the Lycoming 
United Way Fund, according to William 
C. Bradshaw, co-chairman for the drive 
and director of experiential learning. 

Bradshaw said the original goal 
was to meet an established quota of 
$9,600. 

Bradshaw, who co-chaired the 
drive with Frederick T. Gilmour, coor- 
dinator of instructional media, said. 



"Sixty-three percent of the College 
faculty/staff contributed, averaging 
slightly more than $38 per donor." 

He added, "Of the donors, 79 
pledged more than $50. Of those 79, 
25 people pledged more than $100; 4 
pledged more than $200; and one 
pledged more than $500." 

He said that most of the donors 
pledged cash or payroll deduction 
methods. 



"The success of the drive is due to 
all of the donors and the special efforts 
of the unit coordinators," Bradshaw 
stated. 

The Lycoming United Way serves 
33 different organizations and agen- 
cies in the Lycoming County area, in- 
cluding the Lycoming County Blind 
Association and the Lycoming County 
Literacy Project. 



International education topic of visit last week 



Professor Lynda Icochea, interna- 
tional education consultant, met with 
faculty last Monday in Room 125A, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Professor Icochea's visit was 
made primarily to stimulate awareness 
of international education and to pro- 
vide information. 

The grant she reviewed is design- 
ed to create modules in many courses 
and to give information on internships 
and studying abroad, according to Dr. 



Daniel J. Doyle, director of the In- 
tegrated Studies Division. 

Professor Icochea said, "We need 
to teach our students international 
trade in areas such as language 
courses, geography, and writing." 

Professor Icochea added, "In- 
stead of teaching from an American 
point of view, we should teach from an 
international perception. 

According to Dr. Doyle, a College 
committee is working to "international- 



ize" different areas of study. 

He said the committee consists of 
Dr. Thomas J. Walker, associate pro- 
fessor, history and government; 
Chalmer C. Van Horn, associate pro- 
lessor, drafting; Gary R. Knebel, in- 
structor, computer science, and 
himself. 

Professor Icochea is director of in- 
ternational education at Bergen Com- 
munity College, New Jersey. 



laSPOTLIGHTDMoiidij, No». 3, 1986. 



Giving blood: one to another 



Commentary/The SPOTLIGHT 

Life's blood - so short in supply, 
but so much in demand. Each one o( 
us. il physically able, can help alleviate 
the shortage and in essence, save 
lives, by donating our ovi/n blood. 

Sounds like a horrible inconve- 
nience, doesn't it? It isn't - not really 

The truth is. giving blood, on an 
average, takes about eight minutes of 
your time. And a momentary prick of 
the skin. 

The Bloodmobile, operated by the 
Lycoming County Chapter of the 
American Red Cross, visits our cam- 
pus once every semester. The Blood- 
mobile is sponsored in part by the Stu- 
dent Government Association in an ef- 
fort to provide campus and community 
service. 

The Bloodmobile's visit on Oct. 21 



and 22 netted 350 pints of blood. 

thanks to volunteer donors and student 

assistance- 
Three hundred and fifty pints is 

great, but not enough No amount, 

however large, will ever be enough. 

There will always be millions, if not 

billions, of cancer patients. 

hemoph lilacs, accident victims, in 

need of blood - your blood. 

So forget the excuses. We've all 

tried them at one time or another. 

What's a 10-minute inconvenience 

compared to the life of another human 

being? 

The next campus visit of the 

Bloodmobile is scheduled lor March 24 

and 25, Make il a resolution from the 

heart - give blood. 



MJy: Cultural Overkill 



Television Commentary 
By Kathy L. Cobb, Of The SPOTLIGHT StaH 

The public has long criticized the media - particularly the radio and televi- 
sion - lor overkill of popular programming, MTV (Music Television) heads the 
top of the list of offenders. 

In Its regular programming, MTV Is cutting its own throat through constant 
repetition of popular videos. It Isn't surprising to see the same video played 
one hour and the next. 

In point of fact, I have recently seen Cyndi Lauper's "True Colors" video 
played twice, only 23 minutes apart. Who are the veejays playing this stuff for? 
The music audience or themselves? 

Within the last year, the situation has only gotten worse. Someone, 
somewhere, come up with the idea to bring the popular '60's group. "The 
Monkees" back to life. 

Well. okay. I'll go along with that - but only If they can show they've 
grown with the times. 

Whether or not this Idea originated with MTV Is Irrelevant, The facts show 
that MTV has helped push "The Monkees" back Into the public eye. 

Just In 1986, MTV's viewing audience has been subjected to another 
form of cultural overkill - "The Monkees Marathon," 

On Sunday Oct. 26, tVITV aired the third showing of 22 straight hours of 
"The Monkees". that silly nonsensical half-hour program that usually shows up 
as a late-night rerun. 

Well, that's okay too - once, for novelty, but three times? I don't think 
even "Star Trek" groupies would take It that far (but who knows, If they were 
given the chance ,,?) 

And so now MTV has blundered yet again. Last Thursday It aired Madon- 
na's "Make My Video" contest. All day long they played the same song, "True 
Blue", again and again and again,,, to videos submitted by eager MTV/Madon- 
na fans. 

And what did they have to say for themselves? 

In MTV veejay Martha Quinn's own words, ",,.and if you don't like the 
song, well too badl" 

Come on guys, I'm paying valuable bucks for this cable service - enough 
Is enough! 



mm 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Nov, 3, 1986. - Voi-22, No,11 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning ol the academic year, except for 
College vacations, by iournalism and other interested students o( The Wiillamsport Area 
Community College 

Ottice Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W, Third St,, Wiillamsport Pa 17701 
Telephone (717) 326-3761, Extension 7533 



Kathy L Cobb, Managing fd/tt 

Photography emor, Michael Waldron, Adverlising Diieclor: Lisa R. Lunibariircwei' Com- 
positor. Marge M OINardo, Production Marjager 

REPOHTEHS/STAFF ASSISTANTS 

Cathenne A Hannon, Ruth Ann Hixson, Marc A Varano, Todd A Patterson, Janino M 
Sullivan, Diane L Shaheen, Angela S SIpe, and Margie E Flanagan, 

Conlrlbuling Faculty Adviser Anthony N, Clllo, assocare professor of iournalism 



Russian Roulette: 
...the second spin 

Commentary/The SPOTLIGHT 

We all know that the situation on West Third Street between the 
Academic Center and the Gym/Learning Resources Center is not good for 
anyone as it exists. 

We have to come up with new and better ideas about how to improve 
crossing the street. As it stands right now. If s really hit or miss. You can join 
the herd of students that rush across the street and try not to get hit, or you 
can try to come up with a solution for the problem. 

An overhead crosswalk would be an enormous help, but short of building 
It ourselves, we also have to find a way of financing this project. 

Maybe we could have bake sales or car washes. Maybe we could just ask 
what price a human life has. Maybe the College could come up with a plan for 
the students to build us a crosswalk. After all. we have our own natural 
resources In students to build a crosswalk from the drawing board to com- 
pleted stage. 

Let's tap this source and get everything from ideas to finished products. 
And don't get caught playing Russian Roulette. 

Her work has the quality 
of surrealism 

The collage was the winning entry in a 
national bicentennial competition pain- 
ting. 

This was the beginning of a 
beautiful art career. Wald does en- 
courage others to enter the arts, but 
she points out a quote that reads, "If 
anything can stop you, let It," 

'Jumping 
Jack Flash': 
laugh 
of the year 

Movie Commentary 

By Lisa Lumbard 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

"Jumping Jack Flash," a film 
directed by Kenny Marshall, is filled 
with humor, adventure, and yes. even 
a subtle romance. 

Actress Whoopie Goldberg ("The 
Color Purple") portrays an upbeat, ec- 
centric computer operator who sud- 
denly finds herself in the midst of inter- 
national intrigue. What ensues is comic 
action which keeps you on the edge of 
your seat. 

So go on - spend a couple of 
bucks, and get the laugh of the year! 



Commentary on art 

By Janlne Sullivan 

Of The SPOTLIGHT SUff 

Carol Wald Is a noted artist whose 
paintings and collages are often seen 
as commercial Illustrations, She claims 
that her best ideas for paintings are 
rooted in those she had before the age 
of 10, 

Wald's artwork has a surrealistic 
quality. Her paintings are based on col- 
lages she creates before she begins to 
paint. 

The artist has done a considerable 
amount of illustration work. One of her 
most successful series was commis- 
sioned by Fortune magazine. The en- 
tire project took her six months to com- 
plete. During that time, she spent three 
months traveling and creating studies 
and drawing, followed by three months 
painting in the studio. 

Although Wald enjoys her com- 
missioned work, she finds that the 
work she creates for herself is the most 
gratifying. 

In her early years, Wald went 
through several periods of using char- 
coal sketches and photomontages as 
the basis for her paintings before arriv- 
ing at her present use of collage. The 
first painting in which a preliminary col- 
lage was used was The Spirit of '76, 



Meat eaters... you can't 
have it both ways 



Commentary 

By Ruth Ann Hixson 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

This is the time of the year the cry 
goes out from the anti-hunters against 
killing "those poor little animals" ...then 
they sit down to their dinners of broiled 
pork chops, grilled steaks, fried 
chicken, and roast turkey. 

Where do they think the meat 
comes from? It comes from those 
"poor little animals," 

Meat is meat, whether from a 
squirrel shot by a hunter in the woods 
of Pennsylvania, a steer butchered in a 
Chicago slaughterhouse, or an 



elephant killed on the Plains of Africa, 
(Yes, elephants are used for meat,) 

It Is the double standard of the 
meat eaters that is objectionable. It is 
all right to kill a chicken, but not a phea- 
sant., . a domestic turkey, but not a wild 
turkey,,, a steer, but not a deer or an 
elk. 

Coming from a vegetarian, the 
anti-hunting views are easier to accept 
for there is no double standard. 
Vegetarians are against the eating of all 
meat, not just wild animals killed by 
hunters. 

It is ambiguous for a person to 
decry hunting and order a ham sand- 
wich for lunch. 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, No¥. 3, 1986. d3 



Information is presented as sub- 
mitted to Ttie SPOTLIGHT. Questions 
should be directed lo the person or 
persons whose name(s) appear at the 
end of the item. 



New and special 

courses for Spring 

highlighted 



ADVANCED COMPOSITION 

Why take Advanced Composition? Beyond wtiat some students might 
call a streak of masochism? The instructor. Veronica l^uzic, offers the follow- 
ing reasons which should send every serious, conscientious student scurrying 
for a seat in the class. 

First the course focuses on critical thinking, not the sloppy "in my 
opinion" kind; but the logical, research-based, incontrovertible, factual kind of 
thinking (the mark of the educated person). That focus, added to the papers 
endemic to the real worlds of writing - school and work - results in unbeatable 
prose which will also have been sharpened by instruction to improve style. 

So why would students choose to spend Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1 
to 1 1 , in Advanced Composition? They know they can't afford not to! 

(Course pre-requisltes: Able to identify in the description above, a 
sentence fragment, possive voice verb, and double negative; understand also 
the "big" words.) CONTACT: MRS. MUZIC, ACC. 

MANAGEMENT BY COMMUNICATION 

This course deals with communication, management, and organization, 
and their interaction. The course is about organizational theories, management 
practices, and communication applications. The course will give emphasis to 
people and their behaviors in organizational settings. 

A major part of this course uses experiential learning. The student will 
become personally involved in testing the various theories presented. The stu- 
dent will work with problem solving activities, case studies, simulations, and 
role playing. These experiences help the student focus on human behavior in 
an organizational setting. CONTACT MR. LOGUE, ACC. 

DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL ACADEMIC IMPROVEMENT 

SEMINAR: Students who are in serious academic difficulty or are not hap- 
py with their grades and want to improve will find this seminar to their liking. 
This will be the Tough Love of academics and studying. Under the director of a 
counselor, students will learn how to study and will submit themselves to 
meeting goals worked out with the counselor. Behavioral contracts will be an 
important part of this course. This seminar will be required of students who are 
on their second semester of academic probation. 1 elective credit. Schedule to 
be arranged. CONTACT: MR. EMERY, ADVISEMENT CENTER, LRC. 



HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS 

Save Health Dollars... Take the Health Care Systems Course. The Health 
Care Systems Course is designed to give students information on all facets of 
health care. Students find the information helpful in their own family situations, 
a source of information for counseling others, plus many potential areas of 
employment. The course is being offered for the last time at 1 2 noon on Mon- 
days, Wednesdays, and Fridays this coming semester. 

Every Friday there are speakers from health related organizations such as 
but not limited to Women Infants and Children, March of Dimes, Phoenx, State 
Health Department, and Social Security. 

Current trends in the political and economic areas which affect health 
care are also covered CONTACT: MRS. MOON, LIFELONG EDUCA- 

TION CENTER. 

SEMINAR FOR RETURNING ADULT STUDENTS 

If you are an adult who has been out of school for a number of years and 
are a little nervous about school, then this seminar is for you. Subject matter 
will include study skills, time management, financial planbning, relaxation 
training, and other topics of interest to adult students. The class will be 
directed to making the academic transition a success. 1 elective credit. Meets 
noon to 1 p.m., Monday-Wednesday-Friday, first eight weeks. CON- 

TACT: MR. EMERY, ADVISEMENT CENTER, LRC. 

SEMINAR ON STUDY SKILLS 

For students who want to learn how to study and be able to apply these 
techniques to their own lives while in school. Emphasis will be on gaining con- 
trol over your life and study will be more effective and efficient. Students will 
try out new techniques of study. This seminar will be requited of certain 
students on academic probation. 1 elective credit. Meets 3:30 lo 5 p.m., Mon- 
days and Wednesday, first eight weeks. CONTACT: MR. EMERY, ADVISE- 
MENT CENTER, LRC. 




Impressions... 

The new literary/art/photography magazine 

welcomes student, faculty, and stqff submissions 

Deadline for submissions: November 17 

Drop Off: SPOTLIGHT Office, 

Room 7, Lower Level, Academic Center 

Fall 1986 Issue to be Available the Week of Dec. 2 



THE- „ 






416 River Avenue 



•Typing(G«nik« u k, > •Rabber Stampi 
•Prhite Mill Boia 'Keyi 
•Piuport Pholoi •Pholo Copio 
•N0U17 Public •Retiime Wriltng 



•Gift Wrapping •Pickifhig SnppUci 

•Pickiging •Electronic MiU 

•Aniwering Scirict •Word Proctiiing 

•GIftwnp Snppbei •Tenn Piptn 



Monday thru Friday B •.m. - 8 p.m. PHONE 327-1766 
Saturday 9 (.m. - 2 p.m. w^. w 

Prof«Mtonil packaging and ahlpplng of your matorlala In mlnutaa. 
Wa'll ahip your packaga via UPS or, II your packaga naads to gal Ihara quickar, wa'll 
ahip It Air Expraaa for ovarnlght dallvary. 



Still Splattering the Walls... 

...after 10 years. Masters of Horror, ENL 251-01, is a humanities elective 
which explores the serious treatment of horror by authors from the 1 7th Cen- 
tury to modern times - including Shakespeare, Shelley, Poe, Lovecraft, King, 
and Bradbury. 

The course examines the comic book from the earlier forerunners of the 
horror genre to the controversial McCarthy Era E.C. horror line which was 
ultimately banned from distribution. 

The course also focuses upon the treatment of horror in the mass media 
including radio horror shows and the evolution of the horror film from silent 
classics to modern masters including George Romero, David Cronenberg, 
Herschel Gordon Lewis and Wes Craven. 

A special unit is devoted to women in horror. 

The course meets Monday-Wednesday-Friday from 1 1 a.m. to noon and 
is taught by Dr. Peter 8. Dumanis. ENL 1 1 1 or ENL 711 Is a rerequisite which 
may be waived with permission of the instructor. 




Welcome College Students 

Court & Willow Cafe 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 



Lunch • Dinner • Sunday Brunch (10:00-2:00) 

Gourmet Soups • Deli Sandwiches & Salads 

Homemade Desserts • Imported Beer 

20% Discount with I.D. 
Good thru March 1987 



4DSPOTUGHTnMoii(lij, Not. 3, 19M. 



SDrtDTfilADfk Tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 4: 

Today: Gym. 

Karate class, .7 to 9 p.m. in the weight Room open.. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Gym Leagues in play. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Weight Room open. .4 to 10 p.m. 



Wednesday, Nov. 5: 

Weight Room open. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Karate class...? to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 

Leagues In play. .4 to 10 p.m. 
Gym 



Thursday, Nov. 6: 

Weight Room open ...4 to 10 p.m. 
Karate class...? to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 

Leagues in play.. .4 to 10 p.m. 



SGA 

STUDENT ACTION 

Concern/Suggestion Form 



Write Your Concern In This Space: 



Write Your Suggestion to the Problem: 



Date Submitted: 

[Check Appropriate Items] Student: Yes No- 

Full-tlme Part-time Other 

Curriculum: 

NAME: 

LOCAL ADDRESS: 



TELEPHONE: 
SIGNATURE [REQUIRED]: 



■ TOOAJ'" 



Community College 



FIRST ANNUAL 



Calenda] 



Contest 



Anention anisu! 

The College Ij sponsonng a calendar , 
community 

We are searching Tor an original pen-and-ink drawing from among our students, faculty 

and siafT. The wmning entry will receive both prize money and publication credit 
calendar 



GRAND PRIZE $100 



You need not be an established artist or have a particular "style", AJI thai 
ability to draw neatly and accurately in pen and ink. 

This year's subject is The Academic Center 

Deadline for enincs is November 3, 1986. 

This IS a juried competition and ci 
list of rules, visit the College Information Office 

Good Luck! 



•••••••••• -K 

¥■ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



D be open to all members of the College 



1987 



apply. For a complete description and a 
the second floor of the Lifelong Education 



¥ kiKiKifkirkkir'k'kit:'kifkkiKiKkiKiKiK¥ 



ACROSS 

I St A What 18-year-old 
guys have lo register 
with (2 words) 

7 Initials 01 1 and 4 
across 

9 asallash- 

like Selective Service 
registration 

II Selective Service is 
a droit 

12 You must register 
within a month ol your 
birthday 



The easiest puzzle 
you'll ever solve. 




DOWN 

2 Which IS-year-old 
guys have to register'' 

3 What you broke il 
you re in prison— as m 
Seleclive Service 

registration is 

. (2 words) 

„with 



Selective Service! 

6 Notditticull-like 

Selective Service 

registration 

8 Where you register- 

the ^ odice 

10 How long registra- 
tion takes— 

minutes 



If you're a guy about to turn 18, you need to know the answers to this 

puzzle. Don't worry, it's easy Within a month of your 18th birthday, you must 

register with Selective Service. Just go to the post office and fill out a card . 

That 's all there is to it . 

Register with Selective Service. It's GUiick. It's Easy. And it's the Law. 

Piesenled as a public service message by \he Selective Service Svslem 
S'^U 01 'scd 8ASD3 pieiSTfieti g/AD;em c auaAjaA3 z MMOQ mu99m6i3 z\ |ON 1! M^inp (^gs ^ eJiAias aAipaiaS f « I SSOdOV Sil3MSNV 



xymeimc'iamiymgc-im(->m(yme(-:me->m<ymBm(.')mc:)mLxm. 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday. No». 3, 1986. d5 



Attention January Graduates of 
Williamsport Community College 

The rest or your 
future begins at 
NYIT this Spring. 

As you are about to complete your two-year program you realize, 
wisely, that a baccalaureate degree is a priceless addition in today's 
career-oriented world. 

It is ttie right time to complete your education at New York Institute of 
Technology where admissions policies are extremely sensitive to the 
needs of transfer students, especially in the evaluation of all prior 
learning and college-level credits. 

Equally important, NYlT's tuition is affordable. Generally speaking, 
the undergraduate tuition for full-time students is under $5,000 a year, 
one of the lowest of any private institution. And, with generous 
scholarships, financial aid packages, and transfer grants, a quality 
education becomes accessible to everyone. 
NYlT's Long Island and Manhattan campuses offer students an 
environment in which their educational and social needs are consis- 
tently met to the satisfaction of all. A concerned and caring faculty 
and staff are ready to offer you the personal and professional 
guidance that will remain with you for a lifetime. 
Since you've been serious about your future so far, why not bring it 
closer to reality at NYIT? This spring. 

• Career education — more than 50 undergraduate majors, from 
art to technology 

• Dormitories at Central Isllp Campus/living accommodations 
for other campuses 

• Extracurricular activities; varsity sports for men and women 

• Suburban campuses In Long Island; urban location In 
Manhattan near Lincoln Center 

• Cooperative Education Program — earn while you learn 

• IMedical school at NYIT leads to Doctor of Osteopathy 

• Masters degrees in eight areas Including MBA 

• Days — Evenings — Weekends 

• Over 28,000 graduates 

• Excellent job placement opportunities upon graduation 

NEW YORK INSTITUTE 
OF TECHNOLOGY 

Opportunity and excellence ... for today and tomorrow 
Return this coupon today, or call the campus of your choice for an appointment. 





The Dorothy Schure 
Old Westbury Campus 

Old Westbury, NY 1 1 568 

(entrance on Northern Blvd., 

Rte. 25A) 

516/686-7520 

The Matropolltan Center 

1855 Broadway 

New York, NY 10023 

212/399-8351 

The Central Isllp Campus 

Carleton Avenue 

Central Islip. NY 11722 

516/348-3200 



I 



New York Institute of Technotogy 

Old Westbury, NY 11568 
Attention of Chns Capone 

Please send undergraduate TRANSFER intormation. 



Zip 

Area of interest 

Campus you wish to atten 
College you now attend 



k;>fl«c;M(>«K>MC>aMK)««ogK^q»)a«K3aK^w^«^ 



6DSPOTUGHTDMonil»J, No». 3, 1W6 

College 
unveils 
art prints 

The Williamsport Area Communi- 
ty College Foundation unveiled the se- 
cond edition in its series ol prints com- 
missioned by area artists at a private 
showing held Friday, Oct. 24. 

The signed and numbered prints 
were reproduced from a watercolor 
painting by Mrs. Carol Wagner, a well- 
known and widely-collected local ar- 
tist. The prints are being sold to benefit 
the College's Foundation Endowment 
Fund. 

The painting entitled "Marsh 
Dweller," depicts a Great Blue Heron 
stalking through shallow waters In 
search of prey. Mrs. Wagner spent a 
week In the swamps of Louisiana this 
summer studying the bird's habitat and 
movements 

Mrs, Wagner used successive ap- 
plications of thinned paint to acheive 
the effects In her painting. In some 
areas of the painting up to 1 5 separate 
applications of color were made. 

The Foundation is excited about 
announcing this edition of prints, ac- 
cording to College Foundation Presi- 
dent Peyton McDonald. II Is the first 
time Mrs. Wagner has had a commis- 
sioned painting issued in prints. 

McDonald said, "Many area 
•esidents collect her originals; 
,iowever, this project allows us to offer 
a fine reproduction at a resonable cost. 
It is a way that people can support the 
College and still get something of ex- 
ceptional value in return," 

"Marsh Dweller" will be hung In 
the College's Professional Develop- 
ment Center. Mrs. Wagner has sold the 
original painting to the Foundation and 
has donated all reproduction rights. 

SHOW «m MMM VOU SIDNC 



Project Reentry begins today 



ujsi^ssznj^^ 



BARRY'S 

BROOKLYN STYLE 
EATERY S 




ROOMS FOR RENT 
"Save-A-Buck Specials 
Open 'til midnlte dally 



Collage Information Office 

Individuals without a high school 
diploma who need to set a career goal 
and are interested in learning how to 
achieve that goal will be able to do so 
through the Project Reentry program at 
the College. 

Project Reentry will offer voca- 
tional assessment classes to those 
seeking a high school diploma or 
equivalent. 

Beginning today, the classes are 
the first in a series of life career plann- 
ing classes which Project Reentry will 
offer 

Vocational assessment classes 
will provide participant with an asslss- 
ment of their interests, values, and 
abilities In terms of making a career 
choice. 

Upon completion of the class, par- 
ticipants will be able to set a career 
goal, and prioritize steps which need to 
be taken to reach their goal. 

Classes will be on Mondays and 



Wednesdays, Nov. 3 to Nov. 19, at the 
College. There will be two sessions. 
Participants can attend the morning 
session, 9 to 11 a.m., or the afternoon 
session, 1:30 to 3;30 p.m. 

Interested persons may call Pro- 
ject Reentry at the College, 326-3761 , 
Ext. 7451 . An intake interview will be 
scheduled prior to the start of the 
classes. Classes are free. 

New Books 

Five new fiction books are now 
available, according to Ms. Caria M. 
Home, adult services librarian at the 
James V. Brown Library, 19 E. Fourth 
St., Williamsport. 

1. All That Gimers - by Thomas 
Tryon. 

2. The Golden Cup - by Belva Plain. 

3. Hollywood Husbands - by Jackie 
Collins. 

4. Into The Out Of - by Alan Dean 
Foster, science fiction. 

5. The Monkey's Wrench - by Prime 
Levi. 



PART-TIME JOB: STUDENT 

The Lewisburg Hotel in 
Lewisburg, Pa. has an opening for a 
line cook (cooking to order) for a full 
service dining room. This would be a 
good learning experience with a com- 
petitive salary. Call Mary Ann Krinske 
at (717) 523-1216. [Information sup- 
plied by College Placement Office in 
Learning Resources Center.] 



CAR POOLERS NEEDED 
Car Poolers Needed Immediately 
-from Riverside, Danville, 
Bloomsburg, Turbotvilie, and 
possibly Northumberland area. My 
schedule M— W— F 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
Can come early or wait. Will share 
driving and/or expenses. Contact 
Susan at 275-1005 OR In Student 
Lounge, ACC, noon to 1 p.m. MWF. 
[advt.] 



Attention College Students: 



DO you HAVE 
THE WRITE 
STUFF? 



1IWH 



presents 



The 12th Annual 
College Journalisni' 

Competition, sponsored by I 




111 SMITH 
'^ CORONK 



ROLLING STONE and Smith Corona 
are proud to announce the 12th 
Annual College Journalism Competi- 
tion, recognizing excellence among 
today's college writers. The category 
winners will receive $1,000 each from 
ROLLING STONE and electronic type- 
wnter products from Smith Corona. 
At the judges' discretion, a Grand 
Prize of $1,500 plus a Smith Corona 
product may be awarded. 
ROLLING STONE editors will judge 
the entries. Categories are; ► Enter- 
tainment Reporting (profiles and news 
features on music, film and personali- 
ties); ► Investigative Reporting (an 
article or a series that has had a tangi- 
ble impact on the college campus or 
surrounding community); and 
► General Reporting (any subject). 
All entries must have been published 
in a university or college newspaper or 
magazine between ApriM, 1986 and 
April 1, 1987 Each entrant must have 
been a full- or part-time student in an 
accredited university or college during 
the school year in which his or her 
entry was published 



Entries must be received by June 1, 
1987. They cannot be returned. The 
winners will be announced by Fall 
1987 and will be notified by phone 
or mail. The names of the winners 
will be published in a future issue of 
ROLLING STONE. 
We reserve the right not to grant an 
award when the judges deem it 
unwarranted. 

There is a limit of one entry per stu- 
dent in each category. ,AII entries 
should be accompanied by an entry 
form (see below). This form may be 
duplicated. To facilitate judging, please 
mount tear sheets of your articles from 
the magazine or newspaper in which 
they appeared, on cardboard or poster 
board. Entries should not exceed 
9" X 14". Larger tear sheets may be 
folded or reduced. On the front of the 
envelope containing your submission, 
mark the category or categories that 
you've entered. Note on the entry 
form the address where you will be 
living when the contest results are 
announced. Mail entries to: 
College Journalism Competition, 



ROLLING STONE, 745 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, NY 10151 . 



1987 Entry Form 



Category _ 
Entrant 



Age_ 



Permanent Address _ 



Name of Publicatio 
Editor 



ch a bnet autobiography, induijing h 
J history, honon and scholarships, ar 
expenence 



Secondary Health 
Occupations 
students tour hospital 

HOSA Club activities 
provide funds for trip 



SPOTLIGHTDMondi;, No». 3, 1986. D? 



Composite Report Contributed 
By Participants 



The Secondary Health Occupa- 
tions students recently visited the 
pediatrics and nnaternity departments 
of the John Hopl<ins Hospital in 
Baltimore, Md. 

Carol Matiin, instructor of pediatric 
nursing, guided students through the 
Children's Hospital Center. The center 
encompasses nine floors and can treat 
1 80 infants and children. 

John Hopkins Children Center is 
the state of Maryland's designated 
shock trauma center for children and a 
regional referral area for newborn in- 
tensive care. 

It is the birthplace of child 
psychiatry and heart surgery. Pioneer- 
ing work in genetics, sleep disorders, 
and congenital heart disease is also be- 
ing done at the Children's Center, 

The secondary vocational pro- 
gram students toured the medical- 
surgical floor, neonatal unit and clinical 
research unit. They were instructed in 
the Child Life Program available at 
John Hopkins, in which Child Life 
specialists offer hopitalized children a 
variety of individual and group ex- 
periences. 

Activities such as medical piay, 
arts and crafts, and group meals help 
the child adjust more quickly to the 
hospital and their return home. Parents 
are encouraged to participate in the 
care of their child, and rooms are 



available to stay overnight. 

Students were taken to the "Play 
Deck", an outdoor area for children's 
activities. fi/(rs. Ivlatlin explained that 
the equipment was donated by the 
wives of the Orioles Baseball Team. 

fvliss Betty Taylor, staff nurse of 
Labor and Delivery, gave the secon- 
dary students a tour of the maternity 
unit. 

lyliss Taylor explained that Johns 
Hopkins Is a maternity center forj 
mothers considered "high risk" due to 
suspected complications. "On the 
average, 12 babies a day are born 
here," f^iss Taylor said. 

Students were free to ask ques- 
tions. 

While at John Hopkins, the Secon- 
dary Health students also attended a 
presentation of Emergency Medical 
Services. The program was given by 
Edward Shreve, a paramedic with the 
Baltimore City Fire Department. 

Demonstrations were given on the 
use of the MAST trousers and the use 
of a temporary airway. Canton 
students, Kitrina Chaapel and Ann 
Looney, successfully inserted the air- 
way following the demonstration. 

The trip to Baltimore was spon- 
sored by the Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College Chapter of HOSA. All 
funds for the trip were raised by club 
activities 



Single Parent? 

Attend an Open Meeting 

This Thursday, Nov. 6 

at 11 A.M. 

inLRCRm. 153 



Full and part-time students who 

are single parents may be eligible 

for tuition, books, and child care. 



For more information, contact Cheri Hilton 
Coordinator of Single Parent Program 
at Extension 7449. 




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ACROSS 

1 Shaw play, 
" Barbara" 

10 Smooth-talking 

14 Guam's capital 

15 Female lover 
17 Something that 



57 Pan-fry 

59 Come between 

60 Creator of Ragged 



18 . 



alks 



Park 



ZI Harbor fixtui 
22 Sponsorship 
25 Kend 
27 Zodia 



29 . 



elon 






33 A majoi 

34 Bunch of bi 

35 Cadiz cheei 

36 Racetrack parts 

37 Strength 

38 Ounce 

39 Compass point 

40 Less refined 

41 Actress Evar 

42 False teeth 

44 Baseball nail -of 

45 Patron 



1 "I Remember 

2 Excited 

3 English nov. 



(2. 



4 Wallet item 

5 Bob and 

6 Voicebox (slang) 

7 Single 

9 Paris chum 

10 Like wood 

11 Take on cargo 

12 Roman road 

16 Large hawk 
20 Musical notes 



23 God of love 

24 Starter of a race 

25 State capital 

26 Again 

27 Like many TV shows 

28 Have origin 

29 Sharpens 

30 Larvae 

31 Funeral ovation 
(arch.) 

32 Unit of electricity 
34 RhyiKs with Ida, in 

old song 

37 Certain 

38 Party 

40 Football player 

41 School in Cambridge 

43 Like elephants 

44 Use a straw 

46 Movie beauty 

47 French cheese 

48 Sounded 

49 Deeds: Lat. 

50 Mr. Tunney 

52 Indians 

53 Nothing more than 

55 Home entertainers 

56 Shoe width 

57 "Casablanca" 



58 



jardinii 



Doug Bower ^ ''W • 322-5992 

Taking Late Bookings for Christmas and New Year 



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CompuSource 
Computer Center 

COMtinEHENSIVe COMPUTER AND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SERVICES 

COMPUTERIZED WORD PROCESSING 
FAST SERVICE. SPELLING GUARANTEED. 
$1.30 PER PAGE. REVISIONS HALF-PRICE 

Minimum Fee $5.00 

Rod Miller, President 

(717)327-1423 

416 River Ave., Suite 243, Wiiiiamsport, Pa. 17701 



SDSPOTLICHTDMondiy, Nov. 3, 1986. 



Bulletin Board 



Information provided by College Activities Office and compiled by Brenda 
M. Vibert, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Week of Nov. 3 througfi Sunday. Nov. 9. 




EVENTS 

Raffle, -Natural Resources Management Campus: drawing is sponsored 
by the Forestry Club. 

Bake Sale-Sponsored by the Gamma Epsilon Tau, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., 
Wednesday, Nov. 5, Academic Center. 

Raffle. Civil Engineering Technology Club, Main Campus, starting 
Wednesday, Nov. 5, drawing is Friday, Dec. 12. 

Bus Trip, New York City, Saturday, Dec. 6 and Saturday. Dec. 13. 
Tickets must be paid for by Nov. 1 - Seats will not be held after that date. 



MEETINGS 

Student Government Budget Committee. .4 p.m., today, Monday, Nov. 3, 
Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship...? p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 4, Room 
■ 133, Academic Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau.. .noon, tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 4, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center, 

Narcotics Anonymous ,7 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 5, Room 817, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

Student Government Association. ..Executive meeting, tomorrow, Tues- 
day, Nov. 4, 4 p.m.. Room B107, Lifelong Education Center, open to executive 
officers only. 

Student Government Association Senate., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 4. 5 
p.m.. Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 

Multicultural Society ...Wednesday, Nov. 5, 3 p.m.. Room 151, Lifelong 
Education Center, 

Phi Beta Lambda.. .3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 4, Room 329, 
Academic Center. 



SGA discusses program: 'Beat the High Score' 



The Student Government Association Executive Committee met last 
Tuesday to discuss student programming, according to William J. Fritz, SGA 
president and plumbing and heating student from Homer City. 

Fritz said a new event sponsored by the SGA will be "Beat the High 
Score", 

According to Fritz, this event will be held weekly in the Recreation Center 
In the Lifelong Education Center. Prizes, Identified as UA movie tickets and 
free video game tokens, will be awarded each week to the students with the 



highest scores on designated video and pinball machines. 

Fritz added that the SGA will also sponsor a rock music video at a date to 
be determined. 

Other events tentatively scheduled for November are a Thanksgiving 
dance, a movie, a hat day, and a turkey giveaway. 

The SGA Executive Committee will meet tomorrow; it is open to officers 
only. 

The SGA senate meets at 5 p.m. tomorrow. The meeting is open to the 
public. 



WANTED: Student 
Spring Break Representative for Col- 
legiate Tour and Travel. Earn com- 
plimentary trips and cash. For more 
Information, call (612) 780-9324, or 
write 9434 Naples NE, Minneapolis, 
Minn 55434. Attention: John. [Advt] 



Cillo's 
College 



PHONE 
322-1321 

^ 1100 W. TUrd St. 

Corner (««« to 

tke Actdeaic CtDter) 



SJ "^ — Mill - 

JPAKFAST SPECIAL 
^ THIS WEEK " ^, 
^ Ham * Cheese * Egg^ 
S. on Muffin # 

LUNCH SPECIAL ' 

THIS WEEK 
Whole Regular Sub 

$2.UU tm inciudtd Reg. $2.40 

Half Regular Sub 

$1.00 Twindudcd Reg. $1.35 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 

HOURS* 

Mod. thru Thun. 

7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 



Single parent 
group to meet 
this week 

An open meeting is scheduled for 
1 1 a.m. this Thursday for students in- 
terested in the Single Parent Program, 
according to Us. Cheri Hilton, coor- 
dinator of the program. 

The meeting will be held in Room 
1 53, Lifelong Education Center. 

Ms. Hilton said, "full and part-time 
students may be eligible for tuition, 
books, and childcare." 

For more information, N/ls. Hilton 
can be contacted at College Extension 
7449. 



Government Surplus 

Military Clothing 

fand 
Equipment 

Appalachian Outfitters 

15 East Water Street 

Muncy, PA 17772 



Monday - Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



9-7 
9-9 
10-5 



Phone 717-546-8296 



Spring 
Registration 



Class sclieduling will be 
held Nov. 10 through 13, trom 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. In the Academic 
Center Student Lounge, accor- 
ding to Ms. Connie R. Kelsey, 
assistant registrar. 

Returning students are 
reminded to meet with their ad- 
visor this week to pIcK up 
scheduling books and on-line 
scheduling times, she said. 



ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIGHT, 

HOLIDAYS, AND SUNDAYS 



Snacks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 



BENSON 





^^^^muFi 



II Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. y 



.WACC ARCH/VES 



STUDENT PUBLICATION • WILLIAMSPOHT AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

SPOTLIGHT 

/o 

M0NDAY*N0VEMBER7, 1986 * *VOL. 22, NO. 12*8 PAGES 




INTERVIEWING THE INTERVIEWERS - Gerry 
Gartanberg, consumar reports advocate for 
WNEP-TV (at left rear), is Interviewed by Brian 
Hoiiingsworth, student In the College's News 



Writing Class, wliiie Gaii Smaliwood, at left 
foreground, responds to questions of Brands 
M. Vibert, SPOTLIGHT associate editor. Story, 
Page 8. [SPOTLIGHT PHOTO / DONNA L. TRIMBLE] 



Challenge Grant Program Seminar this Thursday 



The Ben Franl<lin Partnership 
Fund and the College's Center tor 
Business and Industrial Advancement 
are sponsoring a free seminar on the 
Partnership's Challenge Grant Pro- 
gram from 8:30 to 11:30 am, this 
Thursday in Room A122, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

Featured speal<ers will be Partner- 
ship staff members, Arthur Helm, 
assistant director for training and new 
business for the Advanced 
Technology Center for Central and 



Northern Pennsylvania, and James 
Kusiak, Central Susquehanna Region 
Outreach for the North East Tier Ad- 
vanced Technology Center. 

The focus of the seminar will be 
on how to qualify and apply for the 
challenge grant program and how to 
write a grant proposal. The goal of 
the Ben Franklin Partnership is to 
create and maintain jobs in Penn- 
sylvania by helping industries remain 
competitive. The challenge grant pro- 
gram provides matching funds for pro- 
jects in three areas: research and 



development; education and training; 
and entrepreneurial and technical 
assistance. 

Those interested in registering for 
the seminar may do so by calling the 
Center for Business and Industrial Ad- 
vancement College at (71 7) 327-4775 



PBL members 
to participate 
in projects 

Phi Beta Lambda will be the of- 
ficial pick-up station point for WNEP- 
TV's Second Annual Feed-A-Friend 
Project, according to Paul W 
Goidfeder, PBL state adviser. 

Plans will be announced as to 
where food collection will be made, he 
said. 

SALVATION ARMY 

PBL members will assist the 
Salvation Army in ringing the bells for 
their Christmas kettles Club members 
will "man" the kettles for three to eight 
hours in downtown Williamsport. Dates 
will be announced later. Some 
members also volunteered to visit nur- 
sing home patients and other shut-ins, 
Goidfeder stated. 
CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA LUNG 
AND HEALTH SERVICE ASSN. 

PBL in conjunction with the Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania Lung and Health Ser- 
vice Association will "man" the 
Christmas tree in the Lycoming Ivlaii 
WWPA Radio is the co-sponsor of the 
20-foot tree in center court of the mail 
Goidfeder added, "for any donation, 
you get a little snowman to hang on the 
tree." 



'Hat Day' tomorrow 

Tomorrow is "Wear Your Favorite Hat" day, according to William J, Fritz, 
Student Government Association president and plumbing and heating student 
from Homer City. 

Fritz said the day is being sponsored by the SGA, and says he en- 
courages all students, faculty and staff to "wear hats and join in the fun!" 

He added that the SGA is working on student activities programming for 
the remainder of the semester and next semester as well. 

The next Senate meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 18, at 5 p.m. 
That meeting is open to the public. 

The Fourth Bosses Night and Pace Awards 

Dinner will be held at 6 p.m. this Thursday 

at the Hillside Restaurant, Loyalsock. according to N/lrs. Susan Birdsey, 
secretary to Business Operations, and Miss Anne Esk, Lifelong Education 
registration clerk. 

Mrs. Birdsey stated that on Bosses Night, classified employes of the Col- 
lege will treat their bossess to dinner. According to Miss Esk, the PAC Award 
is given to three classified employees for their individual achievements. She 
said the bosses nominate the classified employes they feel deserve the award. 
The nominations are then sent to Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president, 
who decides who the three recipients will be. The awards are presented at the 
dinner. • • • Susan R. Dorialioe 




KENNEDY BOWL DISPLAYED - Dr. Robert L. Breuder, College president, 
displays ttie Waterford Crystal "Kennedy Bowl" wliich will ba displayed 
In tlie Professional Development Center. Tlie bowl was presented to the 
College in Dr. Breuder's name by tt<e Britisi) Isles Travel Study Team, 
which purchased It In Ireland during a trip abroad over the summer. See 
other photo and story. Page 6. [SPOTLIGHT Photo /DONN/i L TRIMBLE] 



iDSPOTUGHTDMoBdij, Not. II, I»M. 



• • • Commentary 
. By The SPOTLIGHT 




We know these weren't Your tablesi 




way to serve plant (ood? 



We all know we're responsible 
for busing our own tables in the Sus- 
quehanna Room. What we don't 
seem to be aware of is the fact that 
the helpers in the Room are only 
there to wipe off the tables and to 
clean ashtrays. We see them go- 
ing 'round with the cart and expect 
them to clean up after us. 

This is not the way it is going to 
be. Please be advised of the rules. 
You could lose Susquehanna Room 
privileges. Remember YOU are ex- 
pected to keep these rules 



Now, this CAN'T be Included In a secretary's Job description! 



Election dominated 
by local interests 

[Political Commenlary submitted as a collective worl< of John D. Rue. in- 
dividual studies student Irom Williamsport; Jean C. Wool, general studies stu- 
dent from Linden, and Jerry E. Neace, broadcasting student from 
Williamsport.] 

Political analysts agree that the election Tuesday, although of national im- 
portance, was dominated by local Interests. It is claimed that voters made their 
choices on the basis of candidates' views on isolated issues, rather than on 
any nationwide controversy. Appropriately, many College students are in- 
terested in whether this week's dramatic partisan realignment in Washington 
will affect federal education policies - specifically federal grants and 
guaranteed government loans. 

The Democrats now hold a 55-45 majority in the Senate and have increas- 
ed their numbers in the House. This may present difficulties for President 
Reagan if he decides to attempt further cuts in federal aid to education. While 
he still may be able to gel legislation through the Congress, it is likely he will 
reserve his political push for his pet projects - such as the Defense Budget, aid 
to the Contras, and "Star Wars." 

On the other hand, the Democratic leadership is displaying caution now 
that they have regained power They can't afford to be seen as "Free 
spenders" again. So, although Reagan won't ask tor further cuts, the Congress 
most likely won't be legislating any new spending. 

A strong president and a significant majority for the opposition party in 
both houses ol Congress will probably lead to a period of confrontation and 
stalemate. As for federal aid to education, it will certainly mean a time for main- 
taining a status quo. 

Therefore, fellow students, it appears that what you are presently receiv- 
ing in student aid will continue at least until the end of the "Reagan 
Revolution." 

SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Nov.tO, 1986. ■ Vol. 22, No.12 

Opinions expressed are those ot the student newspeper or of those whose names ac- 
company items Opinions do not reflect official opinion of the Institution 



But what about the wounded? 

• • • COMIUIENTARY BY DiANE L. SHAHEEN, OF THE SPOTLIGHT STAFF 

Funny. That Is how I describe my brother as he tells a hunting story. Over- 
dramatized, full Of excitement, yet very believable. 

His latest archery story is as follows: He and his buddy, went to the Pine 
Creek area to hunt. Sam, my brother, is a seasoned hunter, with 15 years 
under his belt, and his friend had been hunting once before. 

Sam directed his partner up to an old rickety tree stand, and then scouted 
the ground lor prospective deer. It was dusk when three deer were spotted 
walking their way. Sam stood very still, as if a rattlesnake had happened in his 
path. He watched as the trio caught scent ol him. Nostrils flared, the buck 
lifted his head in all directions knowing trouble was in the air. but not knowing 
exactly where. 

The deer, evading the direction of Sam walked right under the tree where 
the other hunter sat patiently. Leaning downward, he pulled back his bow, and 
swished the arrow through the young spiked buck. The deer fled. Anxiously, 
the men got together and searched the thickets for the soon to be dead deer. 
They found it in the heavy brush with the arrow laying along side of it. Ap- 
parently, the deer had removed the arrow from its body. 

The inexperienced hunter gutted the deer as though he was going to be 
scorched by the anatomy of the animal. Yet, his excitement of killing his first 
buck overcame the slimy job. 

It is Interesting to hear the sagas and relive the anticipation of the 
storyteller. Happy Hunting. 

Living with two brothers and a father all my life, their beliefs - or most of 
them - have encapsulated my thinking. Although hunting does benefit the 
family ot the hunter with food and keeps the weak deer from starving to death, 
where does archery come in? 

A sport of skill, more ability then it takes to shoot a gun; archery has its 
drawbacks. Sure It's funi What better way to prove your keen eye than to 
penetrate a beautiful 8-point with an arrow? 

It bothers me tremendously to hear my roommate, cousin by blood, say I 
hit this 100 pound deer, but,.. 

But what? It's not dead! The deer has had its life taken without cause. Sur- 
vival of the fittest, yes. But, what about the wounded? Left to suffer a terrible 
death because a sportsman's fun never ends. Unlike wildlife. 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each l>/londay morning of the academic year, except tor 
College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

Office Room 7, Academic Center. 1005 W Third St.. Williamsport. Pa. 17701. 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 7533. 



SPOTLIGHTDMoiidiy, Nor. It, IMi.aJ 



Martin T. Green, PBL president: "I want to do something positive." 



SPOTLIGHT FOCUS ON STUDENTS 

BY BRENDA M. VIBERT, OF THE SPOTLIGHT STAFF 



"I would like to 
establish a feilowstiip or 
unity between our members 
so that the organization can 
benefit the community and 
the College," commented 
Martin T. Green, Phi Beta 
Lambda president and 
business management stu- 
dent. 

A native of South Am- 
boy, New Jersey who now 
lives in Williamsport, Green 
stated that he represents 
PBL decision-making, sug- 
gests possible charity work, 
encourages members to 



take responsibiities regar- 
ding the service of PBL and 
the community. 

Green was graduated 
from St. Mary's in South 
Amboy, New Jersey, where 
he was involved with the 
yearbook and the school 
literature magazine. 

He is a member of the 
Christ Church in South 
Williamsport. 

Green said, "I want to 
develop my leadership 
skills, to get involved, and 
to leave PBL better than it 
was before I took office." 



FOCUS ON... Martin T. Green, Phi Beta Lambda president and business 
management student from Williamsport. 




Environmental Conference set this weekend at tfie College 



Teachers, naturalists, professors, 
students, and others interested in the 
environment will attend the Penn- 
sylvania Alliance for Environmental 
Education Annual Conference at the 
College this Friday through Sunday. 

The conference theme, 
"Awareness to Action", will be ad- 
dressed by several keynote presenta- 
tions. Dr. Sheryl Charles, director of 



Project W.I.L.D., will speak on nation- 
wide trends in environmental educa- 
tion. Representative David Wright, of 
Clarion County, sponsor of legislation 
to fund the Pennsylvania Office of En- 
vironmental Education, will discuss the 
legislative process in Pennsylvania as 
it applies to environmental concerns. 
The Blue Sky Puppet Theatre and 



Handicapped persons 
helped by program 



A focus on "what they can do, 
rather than what they cannot" has en- 
couraged the success of handicapped 
persons enrolling in a vocational 
diagnostic program at the College, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Joie Williams, program 
coordinator. 

Since it was first offered at the Col- 
lege last year, a total of 33 persons 
have completed the program and have 
gone on to enroll in regular academic 
programs at the College, including 
electronics, computers, food and 
hospitality, human services, business 
and drafting. 

The next program session opens 
during this week The goal of the pro- 
gram, according to Mrs. Williams, is to 
expose handicapped individuals and 
those undergoing a rehabilitation 
period, including drug and alcohol 
rehabilitation, to the kinds of career 
training that can lead them into satisfy- 
ing careers. 



The program is offered in two- 
week sessions during which the par- 
ticipants visit College shops and meet 
with faculty in various program areas. 
Personal interviews prior to the start of 
each session also are important 
aspects of the sessions. 

For information, or to register as a 
participant in the program, please call 
(717)326-3761 Ext 7452 



PBL raffle tickets 
still being sold 

The Phi Beta Lambda raffle 
drawing will be held on Tues- 
day, Nov. 25, and the cash prize 
Is $100. 

Anyone wishing to pur- 
chase tickets may contact any 
PBL member, according to Paul 
W Goldfeder, PBL state ad- 
vlaer. 



BUI Brennan will entertain conference 

participants as they teach ecological 
concepts through puppetry and song. 

The conference also will feature a 
wide variety of workshops focusing on 
awareness, concept development and 
action in environmental education. 

The Pennsylvania Alliance for En- 
vironmental Education Is a non-profit 



organization for Individuals and groups 

with a common interest in suppporting 
and promoting environmental educa- 
tion in the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Additional Information is available 
from Gail King at (717) 743-6450 or 
Sandra Rosenberger, coordinator of 
the Center for Business and Industrial 
Advancement at the College, at (71 7) 
327-4775. 



Women's Forum members 
meet, discuss programs 



The Women's Forum met Thurs- 
day, Oct. 29, according to Ms. 
Veronica M. Muzic, English professor. 

Ms. Muzic said the Women's 
Forum decided to continue the 
"Choices" lunchtlme series. The next 
topic will be "Coping with Alcoholism", 
from the standpoint of an alcoholic's 
family and friends. 

The Forum also discussed a 



possible fundraising idea. One idea is 
to hold a used toy sale sometime 
before Christmas. Ms. Muzic staled 
that the toy sale would also "be an ad- 
vantage to students." 

The Women's Forum has not 
chosen officers yet, but expects to 
soon. Members would also like to have 
another meeting within the next few 
weeks, she said. 



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4DSPOTUCHTDMo«diy, Nor, 10, IM«. 

A Halloween dance, sponsored by 

WWAS, the student-operated radio station, was held 

from 9 to 1 1 :30 p.m. Thursday. Oct. 30, in the Susquehanna Room. 

According to John (Jack) L. Seamon. the assistant general manager of 
WWAS, "It was very successful. There was no damage." 

Approximately 350 persons attended and $346 was collected. An 
estimated $235 to $246 went to WFXX, an area radio station, for supplying 
some of the equipment. Any profits remaining will go toward new equipment 
and albums for WWAS. 

Prizes were also awarded to the most original, the funniest, and the scar- 
rlest costumes. • • • MIchall* Pllmnn 



The Automotive Shop is offering safety 

checks and state inspection repairs to 

faculty, staff, and students of the College, according to Delmont F. Bergey, 
associate professor of automotive technology. 

Students from the Automotive Shop check vehicles for discrepancies 
which couid prevent them from passing the state inspection. 

Anyone Interested may make an appointment by calling the Automotive 
Shop service manager In the Automotive Trade Center, Ext. 7433, between 
9a.m. and noon. • • •Todd A. Eggar 



The winter months are just around 

the corner and it's time for the Ski Club to meet again. 

Batty Rathmel, a first-year electronics student and avid skier, has decided 
to organize the first meeting of the year. 

As a concerned student and skier, Rathmel went to see Ski Club adviser 
Joseph G. Mark [associate professor of architectural technology] to discuss 
why the Ski Club hadn't been reactivated. 

Mark said that student participation last year was mainly second-year 
students who graduated last spring, resulting In low participation In the ciub, 
Rathmel reported. 

Rathmel said he asked permission to hold a meeting with the purpose of 
reactivating the Ski Club and finding interested skiers. 

The mMtIng It to ba hald this Wadneaday at 4 p.m. In tha Laarning 
Rasourcas Cantar. 

At this meeting, future plans of the Ski Club will be discussed. 

Those who have questions may call Rathmel at the Student Government 
Association office in the Lifelong Education Center. , , . TroySnydar 

According to Elaine J. Lambert, director of 

communications, no credit or non-credit classes will be 

held on Nov. 27 and 28 and Dec. 1 as the College observes the Thanksgiving 
holiday. Classes will resume on Tuesday, Dec. 2. 

There will be no classes from Dec 1 2 to jan 1 2 for Christmas and mid- 
semester vacation. The new semester begins Jan 1 3 Brian Houseknecht 




DATE: 10/31/86 

TO: All Students 

FROM: SGA 

SUBJECT: The Student Government Association 

To All Students: 

Your Student Government Association is eaqer to serve you. If you 
have Questions, suggestions, ideas or concerns about your Coinmunity College, 
you need to voice your opinion to an SGA representative. Representatives 
can be located in Room A138 in the LEG Building. The Senate meets every 
other Tuesday at 5:00 p.m. in Room 6107 of the LEG. Every Senate meeting 
is open to all students. We need to hear from you—The Students!! 
Come helo us help you. 

Sincerely, 

Lynnee K. Wasson 

Student Awareness and Communication Officer 
Business Management 
Pine Grove Mills, PA 




Stories on this 

page are presented In a 

somewhat unusual manner - without 
headlines, but instead with the first 
words of the article presented as 
headlines. 

"As effective a student 
newspaper as It is," said SPOTLIGHT 
adviser Anthony N. Cillo, associate 
professor of journalism, "The 
SPOTLIGHT still is an essential learn- 
ing tool." 

He added, "What we're doing 
here is giving students in News Writing 
Class to see In black and white the 
results of their efforts in writing news 
stories. The emphasis on the first 
words represents an effort to hone 
writing skills." 

Cillo said he regretted the fact that 
space limitations "made it impossible 
to use all the stories... but in a later 
issue, those whose works did not ap- 
pear today will have their chance." 



The Society of 
IVIanufacturing 
Engineers will 

meet today, 

according to Chalmer C. Van Horn, 
associate professor of drafting. 

The group will meet at 6:30 p.m. 
in the Sheraton, downtown 
Williamsport, he said. 

Van Horn said the group is an in- 
ternational organization of over 
100,000 persons in 200 chapters. Af>- 
proximately 50 Williamsport Area 
Community College students are In- 
volved. 

Meetings are held the second 
Monday of each month, September 
through May. 

Van Horn is SME educational 
chairperson. • • Margia Flanagan 



SPOTLlGHTaMondiy, No». I», Hit-oS 




WINNERS - In the back Is John C. Falger, broadcasting student from Al- 
toona, and Stave C. Miller, air conditioning/refrigeration student from Al- 
toona. In front are Dennis E. Wllston, broadcasting student from Grover, 
and Scott D.Stenger, broadcasting student fromChambersburg. 



THE TEAM THAT WAS - The team which won the College's Intramural 
flag football championships shows other athletic skill. 



NOW THAT THE SEASON'S OVER 
-Chris J. Mione, building construc- 
tion technology student from Ha^ 
risburg; Steve R. Smith, tool 
technology student from Lancaster, 
and Anthony P. Cusate, broad- 
casting student from Hazieton. 



THEY DID IT - Jack L. Seamon, 
broadcasting student from Hazieton; 
Robin K. Crane, electrical 
technology student from Troy, and 
Jack L. Raynor, engineering drafting 
student from Montrose. 



POOL - Todd J. Waltemyer, nursery 
management student fromYork, was 
winner of the College's Intramural 
pool tournament. 





Members not pictured; Karl T 
Crider, accounting, Chamberburg 
Jason L. Seiwell, drafting, Ha2teton 
John L. Herman, forest management, 
Montrose; Kave Vaughn, engineering 
drafting, Williamsport; Chil< A. Damcik, 
accounting, Mt. Carmel, trainer. 



6aSPOTUGHTDMoiidiy, Not. 10, 19M 




DETAIL - Th« caralully cut detail of tha Waterford Cyratal Iwwl prasentad 
to the College la lilghNghted In thia photo by Donna L. Trimble, of The 
SPOTLIGHT staff. See accompanying story. 

Secondary students 
attend workshop 



Advisor for the group is Ms. Janet 
A. Barbour, health Instructor for the 
College's secondary program. 

Keynote speaker for the regional 
meeting was Senator Roger A. 
fyladlgan. 

New Books 

Five new non-tlctlon books are 
now available according to (vlargie 
Shaw, adult service librarian at the 
James V. Brown Library, 19 E, Fourth 
St.. Williamsport. 

1 . The Type E Woman - Harriet 
Braiker. 

2. The Buyer's Guide to Auto Loans 
- Sherman Michael 

3. The Viet Vefs Survival Guide 
-Craig Kubey. 

4. The Galileo Connection - Charles 
Hummel. 

5. Mushrooms. Psychedelic Fungi 
-Peter Furst. 



Seven students enrolled in the 
Secondary Vocational Program for 
high school students at the College 
recently attended a regional workshop 
held at the Bradford County ATVS. 

The students serve as officers of 
the secondary program's Health Oc- 
cupations Student Association 
(HOSA). 

The event was the second annual 
regional Pennsylvania HOSA officer 
training workshop. A total of 84 
students and their advisors were 
among the participants. 

Those participating from the Col- 
lege's high school program were 
Katrina Chaaoel, Ann Looney, and 
Cherrie Castle, of the Canton Area 
School District; Hallie Farrar and Dawn 
Bolen, of the Montgomery Area School 
District; Stephanie Klessling and 
Deana Hall, of the Williamsport Area 
School District. 




Welcome College Students 
Court & Willow Cafe 
326 Court Street 
^^^^^_^ 322-0135 

Lunch • Dinner • Sunday Brunch (10:00-2:00) 

Gourmet Soups • Deli Sandwiches & Salads 

Homemade Desserts • Imported Beer 

20% Discount with I.D. 
Good thru EEC. 15, 1986 



Trustees approve bid 
for computer equipment 



The College Board of Trustees 
met last Monday to discuss regular 
business. Including reimbursements of 
costs, approval of a bid for computer 
equipment, and personnel items. 

During the meeting, the trustees 
approved four requests for reim- 
bursements of costs, related to Stages 
II and III Building Programs, the North 
Campus Project and the Professional 
Development Center Project. 

The reimbursements, totaling 
$248,477.56, all concern the Improve- 
ment of the physical plant through the 
addition of new buildings, or renova- 
tion of existing buildings. 

The Board also approved a bid to 
purchase a IBM S/38 Model 300 
System computer equipment. The 
equipment, according to William C. 
Allen, dean of administration, will com- 
plement existing for the administrative 
computer system, located on the se- 
cond floor of the Academic Center. 

He said the purchase cost for the 
new equipment is $147,670. 

Mrs. Kathryn W. Lumley, chairper- 
son of the board, addressed the group 
in her report, concerning the water- 
color print titled, "Marsh Dweller," by 
local artist Carol Wagner. 

The print, a copy of which was on 
display at the meeting, costs $75 un- 
framed, and $1 55 framed, according to 
Mrs. Lumley. 

Journalism adviser 
to present workshop 

Anthony N. Clllo, associate pro- 
fessor of journalism, was to have 
presented a workshop session last Fri- 
day at the Pennsylvania School Press 
Assn. state convention at Harrlsburg. 

Clllo, who has made similar 
presentations in the past, was to have 
spoken on copywriting. 



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Signed and numbered, the prints 
are being sold by the College Founda- 
tion, 

"Marsh Dweller" will be hung in 
the College's Professional Develop- 
ment Center. 

The trustees will next meet at 8 
p.m., Thursday, Dec. 4, In the Board 
Room, second floor, Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 

'After Hours' 
to be shown 
this month 

The movie "After Hours," an 
R-rated film, will be shown by the Film 
Society Thursday through Sunday, 
Nov. 13 through 16, according to Ms. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti. 

The movie is a comedy about a 
computer operator who goes to Green- 
wich Village on a date and finds 
himself trapped In a series of absurd, 
nightmarish experiences. 

Four showings will be presented. 
Two will be In the College Academic 
Center Auditorium at 8 p.m. on Thurs- 
day and Friday. Two will be in the 
Lycoming College Art Center at 8 p.m. 
on Saturday and at 2 p.m. on Sunday. 

Ticket holders may attend any film 
this season and may purchase another 
ticket any time. 

Prices are $1 5 for a five admission 
membership and $25 for a 
10-admlssion membership. Non- 
members will be charged $4.50 at the 
door. 



Government Surplus 

Military Clothing 

and 

Equipment 



Appalachian Outfitters 

15 East Water Street 

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Monday - 

Friday 

Saturday 



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PHONE 323-3663 



ROOMS 
FOR RENT 



People are strange 
animals, indeed 

••• A Commentary ON Life 
••• By Brenda M. Vibert, of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 
Working part-time as a sales clerk at a largemall, I have a unique oppor- 
tunity to observe human behavior. People are funny. They reaily are! 

Let's start with the different types of young men and teenage boys whom I 
regularly encounter during a typical weekend at the mail. 

There are four types of males who come into a women's clothing store: 

CCLs - Couldn't Care Less. 

GTWs - Glued to the Wall, 

GEIi^s - Green Eyed (vionsters, and 

NUTs - Nothing Up There. 

CCLs are mostly teenage boys who hesitantly walk into the store clinging 
to their girlfriends' arms, while simultaneously making sure none of their 
friends catch them k a "women's store." 

After awhile, CCLs start to relax, and they might also begin to watch the 
other girls who are shopping. By this time, their girlfriends usually catch them 
staring, give them the "evil eye" and insist that they give their full attention to 
their wardrobe. 

After about a half hour of circling the store, the girlfriend starts her ritual of 
taking 45 minutes to try on three pairs of jeans, tvleanwhiie, CCLs usually end 
up outside of the store "shooting the bull" with six of their friends and wonder- 
ing why they didn't take a detour to the movies in the first place. 

Group two, the GTWs, usually range in ages from 25 to 60. They are easy 
to spot and fun to watch. Like the teenage CCLs, they are generally reluctant 
to come into the store. They immediatly prop themselves against a wall, and 
set their watches on timer. Within 1 5 minutes the foot tapping ritual begins. 
Usually by this time, junior has to go to the bathroom, has dropped his ice 
cream, or both. GTWs almost always end up sitting on a bench outside of the 
store with 13 packages or more charged on their credit card. 

Finally, the third group consists of the GEMs. GEI«ls are not easy to iden- 
tify by appearance, but their position in the store always gives them away. A 
good sign is their arms folded and one foot outside the dressing room. These 
men usually range in age from 1 8 to 50, and they would be happy to see Vic- 
torian Laced collars and high buttoned shoes come back into vogue. 

Here's a conversation once heard between a Green Eyed (Monster and his 
girlfriend: The girlfriend is coming out of the dressing room wearing a silky 
black lace evening dress. She says,"Weil, how do I look?" 

The boyfriend replies, "It's really fantastic but the neckline Is too low." 
The girlfriend retorts furiously, "It's always somethlngi" 

Sad but true, GEN/I's and their girlfriends usually end up leaving the store 
separately, with the boyfriend trailing about 20 feet behind, shaking their 
fingers and cursing the air. 

fi^aybe I'm being a female chauvinist, but there is only one category of 
"female customers" that is truly entertaining and stands out in my mind. I will 
call them the NUTs. It stands for (Nothing Up There), brainwise that is. 

Here is a conservation I had with a particularily exasperating woman. She 
was in her 50s and rather chunky. The lady was coming out of the dressing 
room wearing a pink and white floral dress. She asked, "Does this dress make 
me look fat?" I responded a little hesitantly, "No." She then replied, "Yes it 
does, 's has better clothes." End of conversation. 



Rolling Stone opens annual 
College Journalisnn Connpetition 

Rolling Stone and Smith Corona 
are announcing the 12th Annual Col- 
lege Journalism Competition to 
recognize excellence among today's 
college writers. 

The category winners will receive 
$1,000 each from Rolling Stone and 
electronic typewriter products 
from Smith Corona. 

The categories are entertainment 
reporting, investigative reporting, and 
general reporting. 



On campus, Anthony N. Cillo, 
associate professor of journalism and 
adviser to The SPOTLIGHT, said more 
details about the competition will be 
reported next week. 

The deadline for entries is April 1 , 
1987. 

twiaterial published in a university 
or college newspaper between April 1 , 
1986 and April 1, 1987 may be 
entered. 



Happy Birthday, Kathy.... 

..from all your squirrelly friends in the basement 




SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, No.. 10, l»86.n7 





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ACROSS 

1 U.S.A. (abbr.) 
5 eiblical name 
9 Very cold 

14 Game of bowling 

15 Single performani 

16 Escape 

18 Sepukher 

19 Doles 

20 Pathology suffix 

21 Pangs 

23 Reach the public 

24 Indian huts 
26 Trust 

28 Miss Bombec'V 

29 Southern city 
33 Former first 

lady 



45 Nile queen, fo' 

46 Fencing sword 

47 Gleam 

50 Voice part 
53 Talked excessi 
; 55 Bar order 
56 Strange 

58 Koran chapter 

59 Prefix for soc 

60 Bette Davis mo 
"The " 

61 "I smell " 

62 Religious imagi 

63 Adventure tale 

64 Eats an ice-cri 



35 Absolu 

36 . 



trip 



40 Japanese mom 

4! Agitates 

42 Twilled fabr 

43 Fetch 



21 Oomesticate 

ely 22 all ti 

25 Legal order 



. 31 Stirred up 

32 Julia Uard 

33 Golfer Dave 

34 " 's Irish Rose" 

35 Well-known movie 
studio 

38 Expensive 

39 Appear 

41 Orink s 

42 Skidded 

44 Feel in 

45 Swindle 
' 47 Watchba 






52 Is peccant 
54 Subtle emanat 
57 Comedian Loui 
59 Assist 



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Protvulonal packaging and ahlpping of your matariala In mlnulaa. 
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SoSPOTllGHTDMoiidiy, No». 10, 1986. 

Bulletin Board 

Intormalion provided by College Activities Office 

and compiled by Brenda M Vibert. of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Week of Monday. Nov. 10 through Sunday. Nov. 16 

EVENTS 

Raffle.. .Civil Engineering Tecfinology Club, l^ain Campus, drawing Friday 
Dec. 5, money will be raffled, first prize is $100, second prize is $50, and tfiird 
prize is $25. Contact Lament Butters at Ext. 7272 for more information. 

Contest. ..BEAT THE HIGH SCORE, sponsored by ttie Student Govern- 
ment Association. To be held in tfie REC Center in tfie Lifelong Education 
Center, starting today, and continuing eacfi week until Wednesday, Dec. 1 2. 
Contest rules are available in tfie Rec Center 

Hat Day, .sponsored by ttie Student Government Association tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Nov, 1 1 , from 8 am, to 5 p.m. 

Rollerskating, ,SI<ating Plus, 8 p.m. to midnight, this Thursday, Nov. 13, 
Skate rental is $75, 

Film, ,," After Hours," from 7:30 to 10:30 p,m., on this Thursday, Nov. 13, 
and this Friday, Nov 14, in the Academic Center Auditorium, Free with Stu- 
dent College ID, $4,50 at the door without ID, ID Ivlust be validated, 

Feed-A-Freind,,, project: anyone who would like to donate money or food 
for the project may do so by contacting the Student Government Association 
in the Rec Center at Ext 4763, All the food collected and money raised in each 
county will stay in that county to feed hungry families. The project ends Ivlon- 
day, Nov 24 Students are urged to respond as quickly as possible, 
MEETINGS 

Student Government Association, Executive meeting, 4 p.m. tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Nov. 1 1 , Room B1 07, Lifelong Education Center, open to executive 
officers only. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship,,, 7 p,m, tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov, 11, Room 
133, Academic Center, 

Gamma Epsilon Tau,..noon tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 11, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous...7 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov, 12, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Ski Club.. .4 p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 12, Room B107. Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 

Governance Long Range Planning Committee. .4 to 5:30 p.m., tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Nov 1 1 , Room 205A, Learning Resources Center, 

CE NO Career Explorations in Non-Traditional Occupations, group 
meeting, 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 11,Tloom 321 Academic 
Center, Open to students enrolled in non-traditional programs. For more infor- 
mation contact Ivirs, Sharon A, Doebler at Ext. 7552. 






k1 



WNEP-TV team 
reviews jobs, 
internships 

Internships and job background 
were topics of discussion by WNEP-TV 
16's consumer advocate Gerry P. 
Gartenberg and photographer Gail E. 
Smallwood. They covered benefits and 
possible experience a student could 
gain as an intern. 

The speakers said it is a good 
chance to get a firsthand look at how 
it's all done and this would help the stu- 
dent better decide what area he or she 
might want to get into. 

The intern can expect about 30 
hours or more of work a week in any 
one of the possible areas of study, 
such as Action 16 news, sports, P.M. 
(vlagazine or Pennsylvania Outdoor 
Life. 

and other internships students you 
may write to: Action 16, Box 16 
Avoca, PA 18641, 

"Trying not to be emotional," and 
other comments were made as 
Gartenberg and photographer 
Smallwood spoke about the job, its ad- 
vantages and its problems. 

But, Gartenberg said that as a con- 
sumer reporter, it's not like regular 
news which is just there to take. His 
stories have to be carefully researched 
and thought out, usually with a lot of 
time on the telephone. But the results 
are worth it, he said, adding that it's a 
"really nice feeling" to help people 
because they appreciate it. 

The New York Times is on 
microfilm at the College Library. The 
record" goes back to 1963. 



Carpentry 
students open 
fund-raising 
raffle 

• •• Submitted by 

• •• Robert J. Hoobler, 

construction carpentry student 

from Warren 

Carpentry students are conduc- 
ting a raffle to raise funds for organiza- 
tional purposes including the purchase 
of jackets. 

The drawing will be held in early 
December. 

Donation is $1 , 

Prizes include first, $50 cash; se- 
cond, $40 necklace donated by E, R. 
Kinley and Sons Jewelers: third, $25 
gift certificate from Jock's Sports 
Center; fourth, $25 gift certificate from 
IVIike's Place: fifth, $20 gift certificate 
from Pa. Athletics; sixth, two large piz- 
zas from Domino's Pizza; seventh, disc 
camera from Hoyer's Photo Supply; 
eighth, book with $20 value from 
Otto's; ninth, $1 5 music box, Mary 
Lib's Gift Shop; tenth, $9 gold key 
chain, Greenya's Jewelers; 1 1th, super 
sub Saturday special, Samuri Subs, 
and 1 2th, two large pizzas or subs from 
Casale's Sub Shop, 



Impressions... 

The new literary/art/photography magazine 

welcomes student, faculty, and stc\ff submissions 

Deadline for submissions: November 17 

Drop Off: SPOTLIGHT Office, 

Room 7, Lower Level, Academic Center 

Fall 1986 Issue to be Available the Week of Dec. 2 



H 



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W.A.C.C.'s No. 1 
Radio Station 



Hundreds of college catalogs from 
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Williamsport Area Community College 
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STUDENT PUBLICATION * WILLIAMSPORT AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

SPOTLIGHT 

M0NDAY«N0VEMBER17, 1986 *VOL. 2 2, NO. 13 * 4PAGES 



Women's 
Forum: 
to discuss 
alcoholism 

The Women's Forum sponsored 
by the College will hold an Informal 
panel discussion, "The Effects of 
Alcoholism," according to Ms. JoAnn 
Fremiotti, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

This program to be held at 1 1 :30 
a.m. to 1 p.m., this Wednesday In 
Room 403, Academic Center, deals 
specifically with the subject of "coping 
with alcohol." 

Included In the panel are Harry 
Davis, director of therapy. White Deer 
Rehabilitation Center; Jim Houser, 
director of crises and emergency ser- 
vices, mental health/mental retarda- 
tion; Ann Gimbet, of West Branch Drug 
and Alcohol Abuse; and Norman 
McGaro, of Phoenix Place. 

Maria C. Casale, human services 
student from Williamsport, will be 
moderator. 

Students may bring a brown bag 
lunch. 

PBL to meet 
tomorrow: 
Christmas plans 
on agenda 

Phi Beta Lambda members will 
hold a meeting at 3;30 p.m., tomorrow 
in Room 329, Academic Center, to 
discuss and formulate plans for up- 
coming Christmas parties and for a for- 
mal Christmas dinner and dance, ac- 
cording to Paul W. Goldfeder, PBL 
state adviser. 

"All students In business and com- 
puter technologies and faculty and staff 
are invited to PBL's Christmas party on 
Thursday, Dec. 4." 

Said Goldfeder: "A formal 
Christmas dinner and dance for PBL 
members only will be held at the Holi- 
day Inn In Williamsport. Plans for both 
parties will be given at a future date." 

Lisa A. Folmar, PBL treasurer and 
business management student from 
Montoursvilie, Is taking reservations for 
the dinner/dance. 




SO YOU THOUGHT BOOK STORE LINES WERE 
LONG...Last week, students waited In line for on- 
line scheduling for the Spring 1987 semester. 



Here, students wait in the hallway outside the Stu- 
dent Lounge In the Academic Center. 



$105 in turkeys 
to be given away by SGA 



Seven turkey certificates worth 
$15 each are to be given away next 
week, according to William J. Fritz, 
Student Government Association 
president and plumbing and heating 
student from Homer City. 

Fritz said free registration is 
scheduled for all this week at several 
campus locations, including the 
Recreation Center and the Susquehan- 
na Room Lobby. 

Other drop-off locations are at the 
Earth Science Campus, North Cam- 



pus, and the Aviation Campus. 

Fritz said the limit is one entry per 
student The event Is limited to 
students only. 

The drawing is scheduled to be 
held at 8 a.m. next Monday, Nov. 24, in 
the Rec Center. 

The turkey certificates will be 
redeemeable at the Acme/Super 
Saver, West Fourth Street, 
Williamsport. 

The event is sponsored by the 
SGA. 



College students get record 
amount of financial aid in '85-'86 



College Information Office 

The average Williamsport Area 
Community College Student eligible for 
financial aid for 1985-86 received ap- 
proximately $2,811 to help meet col- 
lege costs, according to a recent study 
completed by the Financial Aid Office. 



Today is deadline 

Today Is Itio dudltne (or tubmlsalon of material for Impressions, a plannad publication 
to promoto croatlvlty In writing, art, photography, and dsalgn. Malarial may ba dallvored to 
tha SPOTLIQHT, Room 7, baaamant. Academic Center, before 4 p.m. 



A total of 2,404 students at the 
College were eligible for aid during the 
1 985-86 year, according to the report 
prepared by Donald S. Shade, director 
of financial aid. 

These students shared a total of 
$6,758,277 in aid for the school year. 
The amount of aid increased from 
$6,757,251 awarded the previous 
year. 

This marks the 1 2th consecutive 
year in which aid volume has increas- 
ed, and brings the total aid received by 
Community College students since 
1 972-73 to over $52 million. 



Governance 

meetings 

listed 

The current listing of all scheduled 
meetings of the College Council and 
committee meetings within the Internal 
Governance Structure includes: 

Curriculum Committee - 3:30 
p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 
Room 120, Building Trades Center. 

Academic Standards and Issues 
Committee - 9 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 
19, Room 205A, Learning Resources 
Center. 

Student Affairs Committee 
-Meeting time not scheduled. 

Long Range Planning Committee 
- Not meeting this week. 

Human Resources Committee 
-Meeting time not scheduled. 

College Council - Meeting time 
not scheduled. 

Work Study 
time sheets due 

All time sheets for the Col- 
lege work study students must 
be received In the Financial Aid 
Office In the Academic Center 
by 11 a.m., this Friday, Nov. 21, 
according to Mrs. Edna F. Relff, 
financial aid assistant. 

Pay checks will be 
available anytime after 8 a.m. 
on next Wednesday, Nov. 26. 



2DSPOTLIGHTDMoiid«>, No». 17, 1»M. 



VIEWPOI NT 



VANDALISM... 
we all pay 

• • • SPOTLrOHT Commentary 

Trees were uprooted from their planters in the lobby outside the 
Susouehanna Room. All the lights were smashed in one ol the parking 
lots last year, a tree was cut down. 

These are all acts of vandalism. 

And who pays lor this. We all do. The costs of repairing damages 
caused by vandalism comes out of the College Activities Fees that all 
students pay. 

In addition, activities such as dances and parties could be curtailed 
as a result of too much vandalism. 

We need to wipe out the stigma that anyone who reports such in- 
cidents is a "stoolie". a lattlelale. 

There is nothing wrong with reporting to someone in authority a 
witnessed act of vandalism. There is nothing wrong with telling a 
miscreat, "Hey. you're hurting me. too. when you do that!" 

The learning process go beyond academic acheivements in the 
classrooms- While we are growing intellectually, we should be also 
growing socially into responsible citizens. 

This isn't a prison We shouldn't have to have guards in every room. 
We all spend a certain amount of time here and we should care enough 
about where we are to try to keep it reasonably decent. 

There are sure to be places where money from the College Ac- 
tivities Fund can be better spent than in repairing the work of vandals. 



SMOKERS... 

Time to clean up your act 

Commentary on Life 
By Ruth Ann Hlxaon, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

As I stood outside a classroom waiting for classes to change, a 
young man came down the hall talking avidly to his companion. In his 
hand was a lighted cigarette and he was gesticulating as he conversed. 

As he passed me. he waved his hand to the side and the lighted end 
of his cigarette passed within inches of my face. I was already against 
the wall. There was nowhere to get away. Fortunately. I was not 
burned... 

As a friend and I prepared to take the elevator In the Academic 
Center, a young woman dashed up. and as my friend held the door for 
her. she crushed out a whole cigarette on the floor and left It lie there... 

I could go on and on, but these two incidents illustrate what I have to 
say. Whether you smoke or not Is entirely up to you; they are your lungs. 
But when you encroach on another's space, you're going too far. 

Is it really too much trouble to watch the lighted tip of your cigarette 
when you're walking in crowded hallways? Is it necessary to drown your 
cigarette In the rest room sink or drinking fountain and leave it there? 

Do you have to crush out your cigarette on the floor? 

Think about it. And don't be surprised at the increase in anti- 
smoking sentiment. 



John Ritter 'stunning' 
as dying Vietnam vet 

• • • Television Commentary 
By Kathy L. Cobb, of Tlie SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Actor John Ritter gave a stunning performance last Ivlonday night in 
his portrayal ol a Vietnam veteran dying from cancer in the NBC televi- 
sion movie, "Unnatural Causes" 

So opposite his reputation as a slapstick-type comedian, Ritter per- 
formed seriously, and without err. believeably. 

The movie, based on fact, explored the possibility of an "Agent 
Orange" connection to the stange illnesses of the vets who had been ex- 
posed to it. 

Directed by Lament Johnson, the drama made its point without 
becoming accusatory, or overly sentimental, as most movies about 
cancer-stricken patients tend to be. 

The points Although no scientific data has proved a connection bet- 
ween the deaths of exposed vets, more research should be conducted. 

Just because It hasn't been proved doesn't mean it isn't true. 





EXPLAINING tfie use of 
the Carrel Is Miss Ruby 
K. Hayes, assistant pro- 
fessor of business ad- 
ministration. With her 
Is Carolyn M. 
Driesbaugh, secretarial 
administration studies 
student from Towanda. 
Expanded coverage of 
the Individualized Learn- 
ing Center will be 
presented by The 
SPOTLIGHT next week. 



Who is SGA? 

By Lynnee K. Wasson 

SQA Sludvnt Awaranass 

and Communication Offlcar 

Every member of the student body 
at the College Is a part of the Student 
Government Association. 

The SGA is led by several 
representatives. SGA has a president, 
a vice president and a treasurer. SGA 
also has officers of various commit- 
tees. Presently SGA has a Student Ac- 
tion, Student Awareness and a Pro- 
gram Planning Committee. A Food and 
Housing Committee also exists as a 
sut>-committee of the Student Action 
Committee. 

The more participation involved, 
the better the Student Government 
Association will be. Since every 
member of the student body is a part of 
SGA, there needs to be input and par- 
ticipation from you - the students. 

All students are encouraged to 
come to Senate meetings held every 
other Tuesday at 5 p.m. in Room B1 07. 
LEG. If you would like to participate on 
any one of the various committees, 
contact a SGA representative in the 
SGA office located in the Rec Center. 

Just remember, every member of 
the student body here at W.A.C.C. is a 
part of the Student Government 
Association. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Nov.1 7, 1986. - Vol. 22, No.13 

Tfie SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning of tfie academic year, except for 
College vacations, by journalism and other interested students of The Wllliamsport Area 
Community College 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1006 W, Third St., Willlamsporl, Pa. 17701. 
Telephone: (717) 326-3761, Extension 7533. 



'Second bus' 
to Big Apple 
on Dec. 6 is 
being planned 

With the Saturday, Dec. 6. bus trip 
to New York City a "sell-out", the Col- 
lege Activities Office is working with 
persons interested in having a second 
bus the same day. 

Persons interested in making the 
trip to New York City that day may call 
the College Activities Office at Ext. 
7269. according to Ivls. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti. coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

All arrangements for the second 
bus would be the same as for the one 
already filled, she said: The bus would 
leave the College at 6 a.m. and then 
depart from New York at 9 p.m.. the 
costs would be $20 for students, facul- 
ty and staff and $22 for others. 

The second bus will not be con- 
firmed, however, until enough persons 
"definitely state and commit payment", 
she said. 



STAFF 

Kathy L. Cobb. Managing Editor; Brenda M. Viben. Assoolale Editor: Donna L. Trimble. 
Photography Editor: Michael Waldron, Advertising Director: Lisa R. Lumbard, Chief Com- 
positor: Marge M DiNardo. Production Manager 

REPORTERSfSTAFF ASSISTANTS 

Catherine A Hannon, Ruth Ann Hixson, Marc A. Varano, Todd A. Patterson, Janine M 
Sullivan, Diane L. Shaheen and Margie E. Flanagan. 

Contributing Faculty Adviser Anthony N. Clllo, associate professor of journalism. 

The SPOTLIGHT gratefully acknowledges the assistance of 
Dale L Metiker. associate prolessof ol graphic arts 




SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, No». 17, 19U.a3 



Blind Students 
scholarship info on hand 

The Financial Aid Office in the Academic Center has information about a 
scholarship for blind students, Donald S. Shade, financial aid director, reported 
last week. 

The scholarships, according to his report, are administered by the Na- 
tional Federation of the Blind and are awarded on the basis of academic ex- 
cellence, service to the community, and financial need. 

Further information and an application is available at the Financial Aid Of- 
fice, Room 201 , Academic Center. 



SGA 

STUDENT ACTION 

Concern/Suggestion Form 



Write Your Concern In This Space: 



Write Your Suggestion to the Problem: 



Date Submitted: 

[Check Appropriate Items] Student: Yes Wo- 

Full-tlme Part-time Other 

Curriculum: 

NAME: 

LOCAL ADDRESS: 



TELEPHONE: 
SIGNATURE {REQUIRED}: 




©Edward Julius Collegiate CW84-8 



ACROSS 

l*A*S'H charac 



14 Pertaining to heat 

15 Tendency to keep 
moving 

17 Vigilant 

18 Vexes 

20 Custard ingredient 

21 Design 

22 "Ten a Dance" 

23 Family 

24 Goddess of dawn 



44 Than: Ger 

45 Attack from all 
sides 

46 Adagio or allegro 

47 Torn, ragged 
clothes 

49 Literary devices 

51 Optical illusion 

52 Trucked 

53 Concerns 

54 Wild animal track 

DOWN 



32 Spill the 

34 In the middle 

38 Deserve 

39 Curves 

40 Bullring cheer 

41 Prepare to publish 



7 Ebbs 

8 Malt brews 

9 Hal de 

10 Meantime 



14 Cod and Hay 

16 "Rock of " 

19 Mediate 

22 Chesterfields 

23 Babe Ruth's 

25 One of our 

26 Electrical units 

28 Anticipate 

29 Items for a 

31 College subject 

33 Controversial 

35 More spacious 

I 36 Ran off to Gretna 

37 Public exhibitions 
for short 

38 Gist 

39 Foremen 

42 Amalgamate 

43 Slow, in music 

45 Declining market 

46 Spanish bull 
48 Syllable in 

50 Converse 



Crossword Puzzle Brought to You By... 

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THE. » 
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Monday thru Friday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 
Saturday 9 a.m. • 2 p.m. 

Protvulontl packaging and ahlpping of your malarlala In minutaa. 
Wa'll ahip your packaga via UPS or, If your packaga naada to gat Ihara qulckar, iw'll 
ahip It Air Expraaa lor o»arnlghl dallvary. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



PHONE 327-1766 



4nSPOTUGHTDMon(Uj. No?. 17, 1986. 

Bulletin Board 

Information provided by College Activities Office and compiled 

By Brenda M. Vibert of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Week of Monday. Nov. 1 7 through Sunday. Nov. 23 

EVENTS 

Raffle.. Civil Engineering Tecfinology Club. Main Campus, drawing Friday 
Dec. 5, money will be raffled, first pnze is $100, second prize is $50, and third 
prize is $25. Contact LamonI Butlers at Ext. 7272 for more information. 

Contest. .BEAT THE HIGH SCORE, sponsored by ttie Student Govern- 
ment Association, To be held in the Rec Center in the Lifelong Education 
Center, starting today, and continuing each week until Wednesday, Dec. 1 2. 
Contest rules are available In the Rec Center. 

Peed-A-Friend... project; anyone who would like to donate money or food 
for the project may do so by contacting the Student Government Association 
in the Rec Center at Ext. 4763. All the food collected and money raised in each 
County will stay in that County to feed hungry families. The project ends Mon- 
day Nov 24. Students are urged to respond as quickly as possible. 
MEETINGS 

Student Government Association.. .Executive meeting. 4 p.m. tomorrow, 
Nov. 18, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center, open to executive officers 
only. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship.. .7 p.m. tomorrow, Nov. 18, Room 133, 
Academic Center 

Gamma Epsilon Tau.noon tomorrow, Nov. 18, Room B107, Lifelong 
Education Center. 

Narcotics Anonymous...7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Phi Beta Lambda. .3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 18, Room 329, 
Academic Center. 

Student Government Association. ..Senate meeting, 5 p.m., tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Nov. 18, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center, open to all 
students, faculty and staff. 

Women's Forum., sponsored by the College, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., this 
Wednesday, Nov. 19, Room 403, Academic Center. This is an informal panel 
discussion on "The Effects of Alcoholism", which deals with the subject of 
"Coping With an Alcoholic." 

FOR SALE 
Ford Torino. 302 V-S, 3-spsod buckat 
seats, amdm cassette, kragers, good 
runner. Call Jetf 323-0450. 



Two VCRs are available for stu- 
dent use at the College Library. 



The College Library circulates 
cassettes and records. 

WANTED: Student 
Spring Break Representative for Col- 
legiate Tour and Travel. Earn com- 
plimentary trips and cash. For more 
Information, call (612) 780-9324, or 
write 9434 Naples NE, Minneapolis, 
Minn 55434. Attention: John. [Advt] 



PBL raffle tickets 
still being sold 

The Phi Bets Lambda raffle 
drawing will be held on Tues- 
day, Nov. 25, and the cash prize 
Is $100. 

Anyone wishing to pur- 
chase tickets may contact any 
PBL member, according to Paul 
W. Qoldfeder, PBL state ad- 
viser. 



Government Surplus 

Military Clothing 

and 

Equipment 

Appalachian Outfitters 

15 East Water Street 

Muncy, PA 17772 

Monday - Thursday 9-7 
Friday 9-9 

Saturday 10-5 

Phone 717-546-8296 




Welcome College Students 

Court & Willow Cafe 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 

Lunch • 

Dinner • 

Sunday Brunch (10:00-2:00) 

Imported Beer 

Deli Sandwiches & Salads 

Gourmet Soups • 

Homemade Desserts • 

20% Discount with I.D. 
Good thru ffiC. 15, 1986 



SPORTS CARD 



Today: 

Weight Room open. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Leagues in piay...4 to 10 p.m. 
Tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 18 

Karate class ...7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 

Weight Room open.. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Leagues in play. ..4 to 10 p.m. 
Wednesday, Nov. 19: 

Weight Room open. .4 to 10 p.m. 

Leagues in play. .4 to 10 p.m. 
Thursday, Nov. 20: 

Karate class...? to 9 p.m. in the 
Gym. 

Weight Room open. ..4 to 10 p.m. 

Leagues in play. ..4 to 10 p.m. 

SKI TRIPS 

Ski Savi/mill trips are scheduled for 
Wednesday, Dec. 3, and Wednesday, 
Dec. 10. 

The bus leaves the LRC at 6 p.m. 
and returns at 11 p.m. Participants 
must sign up in the Rec Center prior to 
the trip. Valid ID must be shown to go 
on lifts. 

Lift, Rental and Lessons - $1 7.00 

Lift and Rental - $1 4.00 

Lift only - $7.00 



INDOOR TENNIS 

Anyone interested in participating 
in an Indoor Tennis League at the 
Williamsport Racquet Club, contact 
IVIargot Bayer at Ext. 7416 between 
1:30 and 10 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday. 

VOLLEYBALL 

Anyone interested in participating 
in the Mid-Semester Volleyball 
League: rosters can be picked up in the 
Rec Center and returned in either the 
Rec Center or Room 209, in the Gym. 



Doug Bower 

"DJ" ^. 




Taking Late Bookings 
for Christmas and New Year parties 



CiUo's 
College 



HOURS* 
Mod. thru Thors. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Comer Fndiy, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 



1100 W. Tklfd St. 
PHONE BREAKFAST SPECIAL 



322-1321 i 

(Ncit to tkc 
AcMkak Cegter) 



THIS WEEK 

g Ham • Egg , 
on Muffin 
^$1.20 
Reg. $1.50 



LUNCH SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 
Whole Cold Ham Sub 
$2.90 Reg. $3.20 

Tax iDcluded 

Half 
$1.45 Reg.$1.75 

Tax Included 



Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 



ALWAYS OPEN 
ALL NIGHT, 



BENSON 



HOLIDAYS, 
AND SUNDAYS 




Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 




STUDENT PUBLICATION ♦ WILLIAMSPORT AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

SPOTLIGHT 

MONDAY*NOVEMBER24, 1986 WVOL. 2 2, NO. 14 • 8PAGES 




Women's Series begins; 
autlior to visit campus 



The Women's Series, this year's 
version of Women's Week, will bring 
four well-known women authors to the 
College for special presentations, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Veronica M. Muzic, 
English professor. 

The four authors are Carolyn 
Kizer, a Pulitzer Prize winner for poetry 
in 1985; l^arge Piercy. author of 
poetry, short story collections, and 
novels; Maya Angelou, author, 
playwright, educator, and historian and 
Lynne Sharon Schwartz, author, 
teacher, and recipient of the Gug- 
genheim Fellowship. 

Mrs. Muzic said that Carolyn 
Kizer, the first author in the series, will 
be at the College next Wednesday, 
Dec. 3. 

A workshop pertaining to her visit 
will be held from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in the 
Lifelong Education Center, in Le Jeune 
Chef. There is no charge for the 
workshop, but reservations are re- 
quired one week before the event 

At 7 p.m., the same day. Kizer will 
give a reading/lecture entitled "The 
Poet's Voice" to be held in the 
Academic Center Auditorium. 

Following Kizer's reading/lecture 
will be an author party in the Learning 
Resources Center, in the Bookstore. 



JNDIVIDUALIZED LEARNING CENTER, 
A. Stover, word processing student 
Maurer, lab assistant. Individualized 
word processing. 

Governance 

meetings 

listed 

The current listing of ail scheduled 
meetings of the College Council and 
committee meetings within the Internal 
Governance Structure includes: 

Curriculum Committee - Not 
meeting this week. 

Academic Standards and Issues 
Committee - not meeting this week. 

Student Affairs Committee - Not 
meeting this week. 

Long Range Planning Committee 
- 4 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday. Nov. 25, 
Room 220, Lifelong Education Center. 

Human Resources Committee 
-Not meeting this week. 

College Council - 3:30 p.m., 
tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 25, Room 
219, Academic Center. (Note change 
of location.) 



ACC THIRD FLOOR - Assisting Lorl 
from Lock Haven, Is Mrs. Jenny M. 
learning center for typewriting and 



Have a happy! 

The SPOTLIGHT extends 
wishes for a Happy Thanksgiving 
to a//.' 



Ski Club officers elected, 
another meeting set next week 



The Ski Club met last Wednesday 
to elect officers and to discuss plans. 

There were only three officers 
elected; turnout at the meeting was 
small. 

Those elected were Barry 
Rathmell, electronics technology. 
North Bend, president; Bonnie Keller, 
dental hygiene. Harrisburg. secretary; 
and Troy Snyder, broadcasting, 
Brockway, public relations. These 
three offices had to be filled due to the 
immediate needs of the Ski Club, ac- 
cording to Rathmell. 

Some future activities were also 
discussed during the meeting. Included 
are fund raisers for future trips. 

The next Ski Club meeting was set 
for next Wednesday. Dec. 3. at 4 p.m. 
in Room A121. of the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 




The author's books will be available for 
purchase. 

Admission for the reading/lecture 
is free to students and staff with 
validated College ID. For the lour 
presentations, the admission is $5. It is 
$2 for a single event, payable at the 
door. These fees also include the 
author party. 

Kizer is a teacher of poetry, a 
poet-in-residence. and a lecturer. She 
is the author of "The Ungrateful 
Gardens". "Knock Uoon Silence". 
"Yin". "Midnight Was My City", and 
"Mermaids in the Basement: Poems 
for Women". 

The Women's Series is being 
sponsored by the College. the 
Women's Forum, The Multicultural 
Society. The College Bookstore, The 
Wiiliamsport Y.W.C A . the Greater 
Williamsport Community Arts Council. 
and B&S Frames. This series is also 
being supported by a grant from the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Coun- 
cil on the Arts and the Williamsport 
Foundation. 

To make reservations, request 
tickets, or to make inquiries, call 
327-4763. Ext. 7269. 



GET tours 
local factory 

Gamma Epsilon Tau. the 
College's graphic arts fraternity, visited 
C.A. Reed. Inc.. in Williamsport. last 
Monday, according to Margaret M. 
DINardo. secretary for GET, and 
graphic arts student from Johnson- 
burg. 

During the tour, the group saw 
paper products such as cups, plates, 
napkins and tablecloths being printed. 

Miss DINardo said. "We saw the 
cups being folded and sealed, the 
plates being punched and bent, the 
napkins slit, embossed, folded and 
packaged, and tablecloths slit and fold- 
ed." 

Also during the tour, the group 
was shown letterpress, gravure and 
flexography In use. 

They also loured the art depart- 
ment, and saw the process camera as 
well as the full line of products being 
assembled into the current catalog. 

"We left C.A. Reed with a better 
understanding of the printing industry, 
and we're planning a trip to a paper 
manufacturer this spring," Miss DINar- 
do said. 



iDSPOTUGBTDMondt;, No>. 24, 1986. 




..and fill ou< this application - 
■ BUT FIRSTI Fill up the trattte 



But what about the wounded? 



...the sportsmen 



Rebuttal to Commentary... 

...from Steven T. Vlttorlo, 

machine tool technology student 

from Cogan Station 

I, too, am a hunter - not only with 
a firearm, but also a bow. But. much 
more rewarding than that, I am a sport- 
sman. 

After reading the commentary by 
Diane Shaheen. I was infuriated as all 
"true" sportsmen should be A sport- 
sman's "fun" is not to see any form of 
wildlife suffer. 

Hunting and trapping of wildlife is 
not only a wise use of replenishable, 
natural resource, but more importantly, 
it is a "tool" used by the game commis- 
sion to control the number of various 
species of animals which will ensure a 
healthy offspring for future generations 
to enjoy. 

As an example of being a sport- 
sman, part of my "fun" in the last year 
has been to receive rabies shots for 
protection against rabid animals - par- 
ticularly fox and raccoon. These 
animals are spreading northward, ap- 
proximately 25 miles per year. Their 
source began in New Jersey after the 
ban on trapping was enacted, to catch 
and destroy, by burning, then burying, 
several rabid coon. 



Other examples of hunting "fun" 
include filling feeders after hunting 
season in the dead of winter and usual- 
ly on foot; going home wet and half 
frozen, only to return after dark to the 
lake with a boat to retrieve a duck I had 
shot and could not retrieve by any 
other means - the list goes on. 

What gives me the most pleasure 
is knowing that I am not an original, 
merely a duplication of nearly one 
million licensed sportsmen in Penn- 
sylvania. 

Surely, we the sportsmen have 
our 10 percent of bad apples which 
also can be found in any sport, event or 
profession - even Journalism. 

I often wonder with so much good 
to write about, why is the bad always 
printed? If it was written with the same 
vigor and enthusiasm it would make for 
much better reading. 

To conclude, the monies received 
from the licenses required to hunt and 
trap, which cost me approximately 
$42.50 annually, account for the cost 
created by the protection and the 
preservation of wildlife. What have you 
contributed to the survival of wildlife 
lately? 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, No>. 24, 1996. * Vol. 22, No. 14 
The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday morning of the academic year, except tor 
CollBoe vacations, by lournallsm and other Interested students of The Wllllamspcrl Area 
Community College 

Ofllce Room 7, Academic Center, 1006 W Third SI. Wlliiamsporl Pa 17701 
Telephone (717) 326-3761 . Extension 7533 



Opinions expressed are those ol the student newspaper or ol those whose names a 
company Items Opinions do not reflect official opinion of the Institution. 



STAFF 

Kathy L Cobb. Managing editor, Brenda M VIbert, Associate Editor Oonna L Tnmble 
Photography Editor: Ivflchael Waldron. Advertising Director: Usa R. Lumbard Chlel Com- 
positor: Marge M. OiNardo, Production Manager 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSISTANTS 

Cathenne A Hannon, Ruth Ann Hlxson, Marc A Va/ano. Todd A Patterson Janlne M 
Sullivan, Diane L Shaheen, Margie E Flanagan, and James T Doan 

Contributing Faculty Advlsar Anthony N. Clllo, associare prolessor ol lournallsm 

The SPOTLIGHT gratetully acknowledges the assistance ol 
Dale L Metzker, associate professor ol graphic arts 



Crosswalk -- a must 
for safe crossing 



As a first year student I thought 
the classes would be the most difficult 
part of attending college. But on my 
first morning as many have found out, 
it was finding a parking spot. After I 
found a spot, I found an even more dif- 
ficult task; it was crossing West Third 
St. 

I have made across most of the 
time. But, as there is for everything, 
one Friday afternoon I was trying to 
cross, and I did not quite make it all the 
way across. Luckily, I made it with little 
injury. Let's hope this never happens 
again to anyone. No, let's not hope it 
ever happens again - let's do some- 
thing so it cannot happen again. 
But what is the answer? 



In my opinion, it is rather simple. 
Install a covered walkway. It most cer- 
tainly would help pedestrians, 
wheelchair people, and people using 
crutches, cross the busy street safely. 

The College should be able to af- 
ford an enclosed walkway, for my first 
semester my tuition works out to be 
$7.28 an hour, now take that figure 
times the number of students. That 
should certainly cover their expenses. 

Why risk our lives when we are 
trying to improve them? So, lets all 
work together until we are all safe 
crossing. 

Let's hear your ideas for crossing 
West Third Street safely. 



Take your time: 

you WILL make it 
across the street 



Rebuttal to SPOTLIGHT 

Commentary... 

...from Michael 0. Burger 

part-time student 

from Montoursvllle 

Let's get real! Regarding your Rus- 
sian Roulette article, the only problem 
existing between the Academic Center 
and the Learning Resources Center is 
those students who procrastinate long 
enough between classes, finding 
themselves required to jaywalk or 
cross in heavy traffic in order to get to 
class on time! 

Needless to say, those students 
are rather lax in common sense and 
responsibility. Those students who 
would argue that Williamsport's traffic, 
at the College, is heavy and dangerous 
obviously have never been to New 
York City, Baltimore, Philadelphia or 
other major cities where such 
"hazards" of street crossing are com- 
monplace. As yet, I have not seen 
anyone injured, hit or maimed. 

Regarding your proposals for a 
crosswalk at the ACC-LRC area, it 



would be a waste of college and/or stu- 
dent monies. If one were to be con- 
structed, how many students would ac- 
tually make use of it? Would students 
actually climb up and down two flights 
of stairs, or would students actually 
make use of a third floor ACC-LRC 
crosswalk connection??? 

Students would probably only use 
the walkway in rain, snow and other 
types of inclement weather. Cost fac- 
tors would further limit such construc- 
tion. Could the College, SGA or 
SPOTLIGHT bake sales actually per- 
cieve raising upwards of $1 50,000??? 

The best answer to this question 
and dilemma would be to contact 
PennDOT, asking them to erect addi- 
tional visible warning signs, decrease 
speed limits, and lengthen traffic 
signals in the blocks surrounding the 
College. Students might then be able to 
become more responsible and obser- 
vant when crossing the street. 

Aren't we taught to look both 
ways before crossing (or playing) in the 
street in elementary school??? 



Call me a Scrooge, but... 

Commentary on life... By Cathy Hannon Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The first snowfall of the season, last Tuesday, two weeks ago, has 
brought out the crazed bunch of people who seem to love snow. 

People who can't seem to get excited about anything during the rest of the 
year are running around singing, "It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas," 
and putting the Andy Williams Christmas Album tape into their walkmans. 

All through town, students gathered anywhere and everywhere to throw 
snowballs at innocent passers-by. These sadistic sportsmen showed no mer- 
cy, aiming at anything that moved. 

I don't see how any person can get so excited over the weather. By the 
time I had walked to school in the snow, I had a pair of extremely wet sneakers 
and socks on my feet - and I was half frozen. This doesn't seem like anything 
for anyone to get excited over. 

Once the snow started to melt, slush was almost everywhere. I don't 
know which is worse - the cold snow, or the wet slush. 

Yet neither snow nor slush deters these jolly folks from getting the early 
"Christmas Spirit". 

Call me a Scrooge, but I think their enthusiasm is a bit much. I mean, it's 
not even Thanksgiving yet, and all these people are ready to celebrate 
Christmas. 

I think all these anxious people should dampen their enthusiasm a bit and 
enjoy the season before Christmas too. 

After all, it's almost Thanksgiving! This is the time that everyone should 
slow down and enjoy what they have - and be thankful for it. 



.<■ .<■ ,(■ .( .( ( .( i I 



.._,(:.(_,_.»:,<_,(: 



Christmas 
Decorating 

Contest 
opens... 

Decorating rules for 
the holiday contest 

1 . Anyone wanting to enter the contest must inform Coiiege Activities at 
Ext. 4763. 

2. Ttie contest is open to students, faculty and staff. 

3. The College reserves the right to remove anything that is not approved 
by the Fire Ivlarshall. 

4. All decorations must meet the Fire Marshall's approval for fire safety. 
Example: Crepe paper must be fire resistant. 

5. The College will not be responsible for theft of damage. 

6. No candles, angel hair or spray snow may be used. 

7. Lights must be approved by the Underwriters Laboratories. 

8. No decorating on the television or monitors. 

9. Each organization or office will be responsible for security and safety of 
all equipment used. 

10. Electrical cords strung across corridors must have prior approval and 
be taped to the floor with a strong, durable tape that will take the traffic. 

11 . No decorating over electrical receptacles, heating ducts, cold air 
returns, or thermostats. Electrical cords are not to be covered with paper. 

1 2. Doors and exits are not to be blocked. Doors must move freely, if 
decorated, 

1 3. Swinging doors may not be decorated. 

14. If trees or any evergreens are used, the Coordinator of College Ac- 
tivities must be informed so that arrangements may be made to spray the 
green with a fire resistant chemical. SPRAYING MUST BE DONE OUTSIDE 
BEFORE EVERGREENS ARE USED!!! 

1 5. Trees must be kept moist and may use preservatives; if the tree dries, 
it must be removed before judging. 

16. Decorations is hallways must be approved by the division director in 
that respective area. 

1 7. All areas to be decorated must be approved and reserved by the Col- 
lege Activities. 

1 8. Outdoor decorations must be approved and reserved by the General 
Services Staff. Please notify College Activities of your intent. 

19. Each organization or office is responsible for cleaning up and remov- 
ing decorations. Evergreens and or trees must be put in steel hoppers that are 
outside each building. 

20. All decorations by student organizations must be taken down by Dec. 
1 1 , at 3 p.m. All office staff decorations must be removed by Dec. 1 9, at noon. 

21 . All decorating must be completed by 4 p.m. on Dec. 9. Judging will 
take place on Dec. 10. 

22. All areas to be decorated must be reviewed by the Multicultural Socie- 
ty and SGA before they are approved by the College Activities Office. Submit 
your ideas to Room 157, Learning Resources Center, Room 208, Lifelong 
Education Center or Room A1 38 LEC. 

Categories of Prizes 

1. Most Unique 

2. Most Old Fashioned 

3. Most Attractive 

4. Merriest 

' All participants In the Holiday 

Cheer Decorating Contest should fill out the following form, and return It to 
Room 1 57 LRC, to either Mary Ann Lampman, Calvetta Walker, or to the Stu- 
dent Government Association Office A1 38 LEC. 



Name of participating club or office 

Proposed decorating Location 

Organization or office contact person 

Phone or extension of contact person 

Category of entry 

[Most Unique, Old Fashioned, Most Attractive, or Merriest] 



Entries now being 

accepted by 

College 

Activities Office 




SPOTLIGHTDMonday, Nov. J4, 198«.d3 

Thanksgiving 
closings, hours 

Holiday hours 
listed for library 

Thanksgiving library hours 
have been set, reported Mrs. 
Kate D. Hickey, director of learrv 
ing resources. 

The hours will be 8 a.m. to 7 
p.m., this Wednesday, Nov. 26; 
closed this weekend, Nov. 27 
through 30; open next Monday, 
Dec. 1, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Regular hours, 8 a.m. to 9 
p.m., will be resumed Tuesday, 
Dec, 2. 

Susquehanna Room 
holiday hours listed 

The Susquehanna Room will be 
closed at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 
26 for the Thanksgiving holiday, accor- 
ding to John G. Vitali, food service 
supervisor. 

It will reopen from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m 
on Monday, Dec. 1 , and will resume 
regularly scheduled hours beginning 
Tuesday, Dec. 2. 

Hours are posted in the Sus- 
quehanna Room. 



Rec Center closed 
for holiday 

The Recreation Center in the 
Lifelong Education Center will be clos- 
ed at 4:30 p.m. this Wednesday before 
Thanksgiving. It will also be closed 
from Thursday, Nov. 27 through Mon- 
day, Dec. 1 . The Rec Center will 
reopen at 7 a.m., on Tuesday, Dec. 2. 



WWAS 'down' 
for Thanksgiving 

WWAS, the Colleges student- 
operated FM radio station, will be off 
the air due to the Thanksgiving holi- 
day. 

The station will stop broadcasting 
at 6 p.m. this Wednesday and will be 
back on the air at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 
2, according to Theresa M. Ronen, 
broadcasting student and general 
manager of WWAS. 

O D G lY SUSAN DONAHOE. ENROUEJ) M NEWS WIUTma 
CLASS. AS A C 



College commercials 
on television, radio 

Commercials promoting the Col- 
lege are being aired on Dimension 
cable television now through Thurs- 
day. Another commercial is being 
broadcast over Radio WFXX. 

Mrs, Elaine Lambert, College In- 
formation Office director, reported on 
the commercials. 



4DSPOTUCHTaMoniliy, No». M. I»M. 




WORD PROCESSINQ, ACC ROOM 306 - Demonstrating the IBM 
DIsplaywrlter Is Natalie M. Ayers, word processing student from 
Wllllamsport. 

Single Parent Program 
meets tomorrow, Wednesday 

The S/ngle Parent Program will hold a support group meeting at 1 1 a.m. 
tomorrow and Wednesday In Room B107, Lifelong Education Center (LEG), 
according to Cher! Hilton, coordinator. 

The Single Parent Program provides guidance and vocational training ser- 
vices for those single parents Interested In attending the Wllllamsport Area 
Community College, she said. 



Potential students who participate 
In the program for a set amount of 
hours will be eligible for funds from the 
State Department of Education to sup- 
plement student loans and financial 
aid. 

The meetings are held every 
Tuesday and Wednesday at 1 1 a.m. In 
the LEC, 

Support group meetings are also 
held Ivlonday through Thursday from 9 
a.m. to 3 p.m. In the Automotive 
Trades Center (ATC). These meetings 
were started Nov. 1 and will be ended 
on Dec. 18. 

Night classes will be held starting 
Dec. 1 in the James V. Brown Library, 
downtown Wllllamsport, for those 
unable to attend day sessions. 



The previous two sessions were 
held Nov. 18 and 19 In the LEC. I^rs. 
Rosemary Neldig. Lycoming County 
Domestic Relations director, spoke to 
the single parents. Ivlrs. Neldig will be 
facilitating the program. 

Ms. Hilton said anyone interested 
In the program may contact her at Col- 
lege Ext. 7449, may come to one of the 
meetings, or may stop by Room 147, 
ATC. 



Don't Be A Turkey 
Drive Safely!! 



WORD PROCESSING, ACC ROOM 306- Working with the IBM Quietwrlter 
7 Is Stephanie L. HIHyard, word processing student from Avis. 

New executive director 
named for Foundation 

Ms. Ann M. Barilar will become the next executive director of the 
Williamsport Area Community College Foundation, according to Frederick T. 
Gllmour 3rd, director of Instructional media who previously held the Founda- 
tion position. 

Ms. Barilar Is currently marketing officer for the Jersey Shore State Bank 
in downtown Williamsport. 

She will begin her new job at the 
College on Dec. 1 . 

Ms. Barilar told The Spotlight she 
Is "very excited" about her new job 
and Is "looking forward to new and 
higher goals". 

A graduate of Bloomsburg Univer- 
sity, Ms. Barilar holds a bachelor's 
degree in business administration with 
marketing as a dual major. 

She also has been involved with 
fund raising for the American Cancer 
Society and the Susquehanna Boom 
Festival. 

Gllmour was executive director of 
the Foundation since It was established 
in 1982. 



p ■ H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h h ■ 



Buy any size Little Caesars 
Origineil round pizza at regulai 
price, get the identical pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 

GUNT PLAZA 

327-8(00 






W.A.C.C. ilndCDti mt 
idditioQtl 10% onl; wllh 
ilndtnl I.D. ud thia ad. 



Christmas plant 
sale underway 

According to Steve Linley, 
greenhouse groundskeeper, Christmas 
plants are now being sold at the Earth 
Science Center's greenhouse. 

Plants that are being sold this year 
include polnsettlas, kalanchoes, and 
cyclamen. 

Prices range from $1.50 to $10, 
according to size. 

Anyone interested in buying a 
plant may go to the greenhouse, Linley 
said. 



PBL to hold meeting, 

Christmas buffet and a formal 

dinner dance to be held 



One coupon per customer Carry out only At panlclpatlng locations h 



Phi Beta Lambda club members 
will hold their next meeting at 3;30 
p.m., next Tuesday, Dec. 2 In Room 
329, Academic Center. 

According to Paul W. Goldfeder, 
PBL adviser, "We will hold a Christmas 
buffet for the students, faculty and staff 



of the Business and Computer 
Technologies Division - 11:30 to 1 
p.m. - next Thursday, Dec. 4, on the 
third floor of the Academic Center." 

"A formal Christmas dinner-dance 
for PBL members only will be held at 
the Sheraton Inn in Williamsport, at 
6:30 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 7. 



Impressions 
to herald 
the new year 

Impressions, a collection of 
creative works by students, faculty, 
staff, and others affiliated with the Col- 
lege, will herald the new year, accor- 
ding to Kathy L. Cobb, coordinating 
editor. 

Originally, the publication was 
scheduled to appear at the end of the 
current semester. However, those 
students and faculty involved "decided 
to make it something with which to 
greet the new year - something new 
for the new year," commented An- 
thony N. Cillo. associate professor of 
journalism and coordinating adviser. 

Selection of material to be includ- 
ed in the magazine will be done by 
juries which included students, faculty, 
and staff. 

Expected to be highlighted are 
photographs, artwork, poetry, essays, 
and similar expressions of creativity, 
Ivls. Cobb said. 

The staff of the publication 
represents a cross-section of majors, 
she said, adding that students in- 
terested in "getting involved" could 
contact her in the SPOTLIGHT office. 
Room 7, Academic Center. 



SPOTUGHTDMonda;, Not. 24, 19U.a5 




MICROCOMPUTER LAB, ACC ROOM 311 
-Operating the IBM Personal Computer Is Cyn- 



dle S. Laychur, and accounting student from 
Montoursvllle. 




Women's Forum to hold 
used toy sale for students 



The Women's Forum will conduct a used toy sale for students on a low 
budget, according to fvls. Veronica M. Muzic, professor of English. 

Staff and students, she said, may donate used toys or books that are in 
"mint condition". 

Donations should be taken to the Tutoring Center in the Learning 
Resources Center on Main Campus. Next Wednesday, Dec. 3, is the last day 
to make donations. 

The donated toys and books will be sold from Room B107, Lifelong 
Education Center, from noon to 4 p.m., next Thursday, Dec. 4, and from 9 a.m. 
to 4 p.m., next Friday, Dec. 5. 

f^s, liluzic said any student "low on cash this Christmas season may take 
advantage of this sale to buy toys and books at affordable prices". 

The sale, she noted, is intended as a fund-raising event for the Women's 
Forum and also as a service to students. o d d d by bi 



Soroptimist 
Scholarship info 
now available 

Financial Aid OHIca Raport 

The Financial Aid Office has ap- 
plications for the Soroptimist Scholar- 
ships. 

These are given to female 
students, preferably heads of 
households, assisting them in their ef- 
forts toward vocational or technical 
training for their entry or re-entry into 
the labor markets. 

Applications must be submitted 
by Dec. 1 5. 

The amounts awarded are at the 
discretion of the local chapter. 



Three trustees appointed to nominating committee 



Three trustees were selected last 
week during a special meeting of the 
College Board of Trustees to serve on 
the trustees nominating committee, ac- 
cording to Ivls. Debra K. Barrett, ex- 
ecutive secretary to the College presi- 
dent. 

Ms. Barrett said the three trustees 

PBL raffle tickets 
still being sold 

The Phi Beta Lambda raffle 
drawing will be held on Tues- 
day, Dec. 9, and the cash prize 
Is $100. 

Anyone wishing to pur- 
chase tickets may contact any 
PBL member, according to Paul 
W. Qoldfeder, PBL state ad- 
viser. 



to serve on the committee are Mrs. 
Kathryn W. Lumley, chairperson of the 
board: Mario Caldera, trustee, and 
Robert T. Manley, trustee and 
secretary to the board. 



W, Jack Lewis, trustee, will 
as an alternate. 

According to Ms. Barrett, the com- 
mittee will nominate individuals to till 
vacancies on the board. 




6DSPOTUGHTnMoii()«;, No». M, 1986 



Student organizations invited to join 'Spirit of Cliristmas Festival' 



The Downtown Williamsporl 
Association is inviting the College's 
student organizations to tal<e part in its 
"Spirit of Chhstmas Festival", Ms. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti. coordinator of Col- 
lege activities, reported last week. 

Ms. Fremiotti explained that one 



way of participation might be through 
caroling in mid-city. 

Each evening, Monday through 
Friday, from this Friday, Nov. 28, 
through Tuesday, Dec. 23, the associa- 
tion is hoping to have "old-fashioned, 
live, touring holiday carolers." 



Comments Ms. Fremiotti: "We 
would be delighted to have your group 
join in the fun!" 

She explained that the association 
is hoping to have three groups of 
carolers touring the downtown streets 
each of the evenings from 6:30 to 8:30 



p.m. 

The schedule will be advertised 
weekly, "giving each group some well- 
deserved recognition". 

Free coffee, hot chocolate and 
snacks will be provided the carolers at 
one of the downtown eating 
establishments. 




COMPUTER SCIENCE LABORATORY, ACC 
ROOM 314 - Assisting Crista Lynn SIdier, word 
processing student from Wllllamsport, on the 



digital VT 102, Is Rhonda L. Hopple, a work 
study, computer science student from Sun- 
bury. 



Tliree given 
awards 
at annual 
Bosses' Night 

Three employees of the College 
were honored with P. ACE. Awards 
during the fourth annual Bosses' Night, 
according to Miss Tracy J. Knaus, 
secretary to the director of College 
communications. 

Plaques were presented to: 

-Mrs. Michelle E. Aunkst, 
secretary to the director of the Health 
Sciences Division. 

- Mrs. Matilda S. Elmer, secretary 
to the director of Experiential Learning 
Career Services. 

~ Mrs. Gloria H. Valencik, 
secretary to the director of the 
Business and Computer Technologies 
Division. 

The Bosses' Night dinner was held 
Nov. 13 at The Hillside. 

Each of the award recipients was 
nominated by her "boss". Nominations 
are forwarded to Dr. Robert L. Breuder, 
College president, who makes the final 
decision. 



Work on Professional Developnnent Center 'nnoving along rapidly' 

irr-nrHinn ir. n, D=i,,h u^,„. gnd Is being cOHstructed by students other items. o |- y 



According to Dr. Ralph Home, 
director of the Construction 
Technology Division, progress on the 
Professional Development Center Is 
moving along rapidly. 

The new building, on Susquehan- 
na Street south of the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center, was designed by students 



with some help and guidance from 
faculty and staff. 

The structure itself is finished and 
all that needs to be done are the in- 
terior finishes - which include, for in- 
stance, plumbing and heating, electric 
wiring, and some painting as well as 



Individualized Learning Center: 
taking typing step by step 



ment - a chance to develop skills, the 
director said. 

Local groups, he added, will also 
be encouraged to use the building in 
their efforts to attract business and in- 
dustry to the area. 

The director noted, "The Profes- 
sional Development Center will serve 
as a permanent testimonial to the quali- 
ty education our students receive." 

NEWS 
CLASS, A 



"For a student who has never had 
typing, this program has an advantage. 
Students don't have to worry about 
keeping up with their faster peers," 
said Mrs. Jenny M. Maurer. lab assis- 
tant. Individualized learning center for 
typewriting and word processing. 

Each of the 1 5 viewing stalls in the 
ILC are called Carrels. Students have 
access to slide tape presentations 
which teach them what they need to 
know for that particular lesson. The 
slides are then taken to the individual 
carrel stalls to be viewed. Students 
then go back to the practice stations 
for typing. 

Mrs. Maurer added, "Audio 
cassettes are also available. These 



take the students through the lessons 
step by step." 

According to Mrs. Patricia J. 
Shoff, associate professor of business 
administration, "Students must attend 
a regularly scheduled class. However, 
these students are welcome to work 
ahead and finish the course early". 

The ILC Is open from 7:30 a.m to 
9:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, 
and 7:30 a.m., to 4 p.m., on Friday. 

Mrs. Shoff pointed out that the ILC 
is in use continuously by classes, but - 
If time and space permit - it may be us- 
ed otherwise. Students interested in 
using the ILC at times other than class 
times should check with the lab assis- 
tant first, she said. 



The director pointed out that a 
number of the College's programs are 
represented in the construction of the 
building. 

They are service and operation of 
heavy construction equipment, land- 
scape nursery technology, construc- 
tion carpentry, building construction 
technology, plumbing and heating, air 
conditioning/refrigeration, electrical oc- 
cupations, and architectural 
technology. 

Over 1 ,000 students have thus far 
been involved in the construction. 

He said the completion of the Pro- 
fessional Development Center should . , , 
come this Winter If everything goes artlSt tO VlSlt 
along with the plans and schedule. 

Once completed, the center will "Marsh Dweller, 

be used for College-hosted meetings, 
conferences, and seminars which will 
also provide another group of students 
-those In food and hospitality manage- 



Painting 

to be displayed; 




Don't Be A Turkey 
Drive Safely!! 



the original 
watercolor painting recently sold to the 
College Foundation by local artist 
Carol Wagner, will be on display from 4 
to 6 p.m.. next Friday. Dec. 5, in Le 
Jeune Chef, according to Ms. Nora M. 
Martz, administrative assistant to the 
College president. 

Ms. Martz said that the artist, Mrs. 
Wagner, will be a guest at the event. 

Refreshments will be served. 

The College Foundation Is selling 
prints of the painting to benefit the En- 
dowment Fund. 



Performing Artist Series 
ticicets now available 



The Performing Artist Series, 
sponsored by the College, will present 
perfornaances in the Scottish Rite 
Auditorium in Williamsport, on Satur- 
days. Jan. 31, Feb. 21, and March 14. 

Single prices for the series in- 
clude: A Chorus Line, a Broadway Hit, 
Saturday. Jan. 31. $20 reserved. $15 
non-reserved; Steve Landesburg. 
Saturday. Feb. 21. $15 reserved. $10 
non-reserved, and Maynard Ferguson 
with High Voltage. Saturday. March 1 5. 
$15 reserved, $12 non-reserved. 

JOB OPS 

TAD Technical Services. 158 
Monroe Ave.. Rochester. NY 14607. 
places technicians in a 35-mile radius 
of Rochester. They welcome resumes 
from air conditioning and refrigeration, 
architectual technology, automotive 
mechanics, automotive technology, 
building construction technology, civil 
engineering technology, engineering 
drafting technololgy. electronics 
technology, machinist general, tool 
technology, industrial drafting, plumb- 
ing and heating, technical illustration, 
tool design technology. Send resume 
to the attention of Maria Pagani. 
Technical Recruiter. 

Matt Rinker Builder. Box 19. 
Hillsgrove, Pa. 18619. has an opening 
for construction carpentry, building 
construction technology graduates. 
Send resume. 

(^uncy Homes, P.O. Box 325, 
Muncy, Pa. 1 7756 has an opening for 
an architechtual technology or in- 
dustrial drafting to do shop drawings 
and floor plans for custom homes. 
Send a resume to Edward Milunic. 
director of engineering. 

Gilbert Associates. Inc.. Box 
1498, Reading, Pa. 19603, has open- 
ing for forest technology, or civil 
engineering technology graduates for 
surveying. Send a resume to Robert D. 
Grosser, chief of surveying. 

Instructor speaks 
at marketing forum 

Mrs. Donna G. Pfeuffer. business 
administration instructor, spoke at a 
small business marketing forum held at 
the Sheraton Inn on Nov. 13. 

Mrs. Pfeuffer spoke to small 
business owners on the topic of "Plan- 
ning Your Marketing Strategy." 



New Books 

Five new books are now 
available, according to Ms. Caria 
M. Home, adult librarian, at the 
James V. Brown Library. 19 E. 
Fourth St., Williamsport. 

1 . Whirlwind - James Clavell 

2. The Prince of Tides - Pat 
Conroy 

3. A Taste for Death - P. D. 
James 

4. Foundation and Earth -\saac 
Asimov 

5. Fiight of the Intruder 
-Stephen Coonts 



Season tickets are $40 for 
patrons, and $35 general admission. 

Season tickets can be obtained by 
stopping in the College Activities Of- 
fice. Room 108. Gym, or by calling 
326-4763, Ext. 7269. 

Season tickets are available to the 
public at three locations, including B&S 
Picture Frames. 400 Market St., 
Williamsport; the Caboose Restaraunt, 
500 Pine St., Williamsport; and the Col- 
lege Activities Office. 

Blind students 
scholarship 
forms still 
available 

Information and applications for a 
scholarship awarded by the National 
Federation of the Blind, for blind 
students, remains available in the Col- 
lege's Financial Aid Office in the 
Academic Center. 

The scholarships are awarded on 
the basis of academic excellence, ser- 
vice to the community, and financial 
need, according to Donald S. Shade, 
financial aid director. 

The Financial Aid Office is in 
Room 201 . Academic Center. 

Work Study checks 
ready Wednesday after 8 

students involved in the College 
Work Study Program will be able to 
pick up their checks in the Financial 
Aid Office in the Academic Center after 
8 a.m. this Wednesday. 

Mrs. Edna F. Reiff, financial aid 
assistant, pointed out that the upcom- 
ing Thanksgiving holiday caused a 
temporary change in the paycheck 
distribution routine. 



New students' tests 
to be in December 

The Advisement and Career Ser- 
vices Center has already begun testing 
new students for the Spring Semester, 
but, according to Lawrence W. Emery 
Jr., director, the College will conduct 
more tests in December. 

The tests will be administered on 
Dec. 2. 4. 9. 11, and 18. 

The last possible date for testing is 
Tuesday. Jan. 6. which is also the last 
day for registration. 

Those with additional questions 
may call or visit the Advisement and 
Career Services Center. 




SPOTLIGHTDMond«y, Noi. U, IMt.D? 



collegiate crossword 

I 



19 ■■20" 21 M22 

26 I^BIb ^^P 

H I 32 M33 fl \ 1 \ 



'» ■W6~ 47 ■|48 

52 I^Hm ^^^P 



i 



Collegiate CH84-29 






per; 



14 Frequenter 

15 Stuffed oneself 

17 Classroom need 

18 Experienced person 

19 Big bundle 

20 Knockout substance 

22 Suffix: body 

23 Basic Latin verb 

24 Division of time 

26 Ship of old 
28 Be afraid of 

30 Nota 

31 Old men 

33 Musical pieces 

35 Exploit 

36 Tennis term 

37 Disciplined and 

41 Radio or TV muff 

45 Heap 

46 Picture game 

48 Designate 

49 Mr. Gershwin 



50 Part of USAF 

51 science 

52 "Aba Honeyinoor 

54 Aquatic maimial 

56 fide 

57 Cotton cloth 
59 Eating place 



61 Cer 

62 Howl 

63 Most sound 

64 Men of Madrid 

DOWN 

1 Affair 

2 Old TV western 

3 Edible mollusk 

4 Workshop item 



certainty 

7 "Scarlet Letter" 
character, et al . 

8 Catholic devotion 

9 Assert 

10 See 6-Down 



II I 



12 Rank above knight 

13 Endurance 

" 16 Relatives on the 

21 Garden tool 

27 Sky-blue 

28 Gloomy (poet. } 

29 "Valley of the " 

30 Relay-race item 
32 Comion suffix 
34 Prefix: new 

37 House bug 

38 "The of 

Penzance" 

39 Tusca 

40 Most 

42 Site of famous 
observatory 

43 Cone forth 

44 Payment returns 
47 Computer term 

53 " for All 

Seasons" 

54 Individuals 

55 Mark with lines 

56 Heavy knife 

58 Past president 



:idy 



This Week's Puzde Brought to You By... 

Cathy's Diner 

1170 W. 4lh St. • Williamsport, Pa. 17701 * Phone 323-3224 



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Don't Drink and Drive! 



Student nurses give a squeeze 

Contrlbutad by Mrs. Margarat McKaahan, profatsor of nuraing 

Bethune Douglass was the setting for this month's American Heart 
Association Blood Pressure Screening. 

Volunteering for five third semester practical nursing students: Holly Kl- 
ingler. Lisa Newman. Anne Krosnicki. Heike Rouse, and Darlene Graves. 

The American Heart Association schedules blood pressure screenings 
every first Thursday of each month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Various pamphlets are made available including ones about cooking 
without sale, nutritious nibbles, and other health promotion topics. Cookbooks 
published by the heart association are also available for purchase. 

At the most recent screening, the service was available to the public, but 
the majority of the participants screened were members of the Lycoming 
County Senior Citizens Group. 



SaSPOTUGHTaMoDda;, Nov. 24, 1986. 

Bulletin Board 

BULLETIN BOARD 

Informalion provided by College Activities Office and compiled 
By Brenda M. Vibert of Tfte SPOTLIGHT Staff 
Week of l^onday. Nov. 24 througti Sunday. Nov. 30 
EVENTS 
SGA turkey tickets drawing is to be held at 8 a.m.. today. 
Ski trip. .Ski Sawmill. Dec. 3, anyone interested in going is to sign up in 
ttie Rec Center Office, A137, Learning Resources Center. 
MEETINGS 
Student Government Association. ..Executive meeting, 4 p.m. tomorrow, 
Nov. 25, Room B107, Lifelong Education Center, open to executive officers 
only. 

Alpha Omega Fellowship. .7 p.m. tomorrow, Nov. 25, Room 133, 
Academic Center. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau...noon tomorrow, Nov. 25, Room B107, Lifelong 
Education Center, 

Narcotics Anonymous. .7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 26, Room B107, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Delta Phi Omega.. .12:30 p.m. tomorrow. Room 107, Academic Center. 
C. END, .Career Explorations in Nontraditional Occupations, meeting for 
students enrolled m nontraditional programs, (according to gender), tomorrow, 
Tuesday, Nov 25, Room 321 , Academic Cenler 



"Beat the High Score" 
winners announced 

Hunter, 

Winners receive UA movie tickets 
or free video game tokens. 

According to William J. Fritz, Stu- 
dent Government Association presi- 
dent and plumbing and heating student 
from Homer City, "Beat the High 
Score" is held every week in the Rec 
Center, Lifelong Education Center, and 
is sponsored by the SGA 



Winners in the "Beat the High 
Score" for the week of Nov. 1 through 
16 are Thomas R. fvlarshall, engineer- 
ing technology, Williamsporl, 47,690, 
Pole Position; Kent M. Weaver, tool 
technology. New Holland, 1,555,470, 
Sorcerer; and John R. Leitner, food 
and hospitality, WInfield, 262,030, 
Xevlous. 

There was no winner for Spy 



SPORTS 
CARD 

Today: 

Weight Room open. .4 to 10 p.m. 
Leagues in play. ,4 to 10 p.m. 
Karate class.. ,7 to 9 p.. in the gym. 
Tomorrow, Tuesday, No*. 24 

Weight Room open. ..4 to 10 p.m. 
Leagues in play. ..4 to 10 p.m. 

INDOOR TENNIS 

Anyone interested in participating 
in an Indoor Tennis League at the 
Williamspon Racquet Club, contact 
Margot Bayer at Ext. 7416 between 
1:30 and 10 p.m., Ivlonday through 
Thursday. 

There will be rollerskating at 
Skating Plus 8 p.m. to 12 p.m., on 
Thursday, Dec. 4. Skate rental is $.75. 
Admission is free with validated ID. 

3 on 3 Super Shick rosters are due 
on Tuesday, Dec. 2. They can be drop- 
ped off in Room 209. 

Sign up sheets for skiing are in the 
Rec Center. 

There are no karate classes on 
(VIonday, Dec. 1 , and Thursday, Dec. 4, 

Swimming hours at the Y.N/1.C.A 
are as follows: (Monday, Wednesday, 
8:30 to 9:30 p.m., Friday, 7:30 to 9 
p.m., Saturday, 1 to 6 p.m., Sunday, 1 2 
to 5 p.m., Ivlonday through Friday, 3 to 
4 p.m. These are all open swims. Ad- 
mission is $2 with validated College ID. 



Government Surplus 

Military Clothing 

and 

Equipment 

Appalachian Outfitters 

15 East Water Street 

Muncy, PA 17772 



Monday - Thursday 9-7 
Friday 9-9 

Saturday 10-5 

Phone 717-546-8296 



i 



Seminar to be held 

BY RUTH ANN HIXSON, OF THE SPOTLIGHT STAFF 

A "Dress For Success" seminar will be held 9 a.m. to noon on Monday, 
Dec. 8 at the North Campus, according to fulrs. Barbara A. Heck, secretary to 
the assistant coordinator of the practical nursing program on the North Cam- 
pus at Wellsboro. 

f^s, Beth Sleboda, a professional fashion image color consultant, will be 
the instructor. 

The seminar will be based on the principles discussed in John tvlolloy's 
best selling book. Dress For Success. 

I«1s. Sleboda will discuss how to dress for maximum effect to influence 
perceptions of authority and competence in social and business settings, fvirs. 
Heck said. 

All faculty and staff, part-time and full-time, may register for this seminar 
at no cost. The public is invited to attend for a $5 registration fee. 

Deadline to register is Wednesday, Dec. 3. For more information or to 
register, call (717) 724-7704 in the Lifelong Education Office on the North 
Campus, 



For Sale - Five white Mojave 
Ford Pickup wheels. 15 Inch with 
5-lug pattern. 9 Inches wide. Call 
538-1113. f/Advr; 

SHARE APARTMENT 

Male student entering the elec- 
trical technology program In Jan. 
1987, Interested In sharing an apart- 
ment for spring semester. Student Is 
from West Hazelton. Please contact 
Lawrence W. Emery, Jr., director of 
advisement and career services, 
Room 157, Learning Resources 
Center. [Advt.] 



WiDoM^' 



Welcome College Students 

Court & Willow Cafe 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 

Lunch • 

Dinner • 

Sunday Brunch (10:00-2:00) 

Imported Beer 

Deli Sandwiches & Salads 

Gourmet Soups • 

Homemade Desserts • 

20% Discount with I.D. 
Good thru iEC. 15, 1986 



CiUo's 


HOURS* 


LUNCH SPECIAL 


College 


Moo. thro Tbnn. 


THIS WEEK 


7:30 ».n. to 6 p.m. 


Half Meatball Sub 


Comer 


Fridiy, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 


with Cheese 


"-^•™^*'- .^<W^vV 


$1.65 


PHONE 


BREAKFAST SPECIAL 


Reg. 


322-1321 


4 THIS WEEK ^ 


$1.95 




Steak • Cheese • Egg SUB ^" "''"^ 




$1.50 Reg. $1.80 

Tn Includtd 


Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 



ALWAYS OPEN 
ALL NIGHT, 



BENSON 



HOLIDAYS, 
AND SUNDAYS 




Corner of 3rd and Maynard 




Snaeks 

Hot and Cold Drinks 

Groceries 

Gasoline 




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1 



WACC ARCHIVES 




2DSP0TtIGBTOT«e»diy, D«c. 2, 1986. 

Carolyn Kizer to visit campus 
til is weei< for Women's Series 

BY RUTH ANN MIXSON, OF THE SPOTKQHT STAFF 

Carolyn Kizer, Pulitzer Prize winning poet and author, will visit the College 
campus for a workshop in Le Jeune Chel in the Lifelong Education Center from 
2 to 3:30 p.m this Wednesday, according to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti. College 
activities coordinator- 
Ms. Kizer is a teacher of writing poetry and a lecturer in colleges from 
coast to coast She has held posts as 
poet-in-residence at many major col- 
leges. 

At 7 p.m. Wednesday, a 
reading/lecture will be given by Ms. 
Kizer in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. An author party in the 
Bookstore in the Learning Resources 
will follow the reading/lecture. 

Next semester, additional presen- 
tations in the Women's Series will be 
given by Marge Piercy, poet and writer 
of short stories and novels; Maya 
Angelou, author, playwright, educator, 
and historian, and Lynne Sharon 
Schwartz, author, teacher, and reci- 
pient of the Guggenheim Fellowship, 

The Women's Series Is being 
sponsored by the College, by the 
Women's Forum, by the Multicultural 
Society, by the College Bookstore, by 
the Wllliamsport YWCA, the Greater 
Williamsport Community Arts Council, 
and by B & S Frames. 

The series Is also being supported „ ,f,g,g ^^ sufficient interest, a trip 

by a grant from the Commonwealth of ,(, ,f,e Philadelphia Flower Show during 
Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the week of March 1 5 will be planned 



FHMSO to meet Friday 

The Food and Hospitality Management Student Organization (FHMSO) 
met Wednesday, Nov. 1 9 to discuss plans for a trip to Chicago in May. a dance 
in January, and other fund-raisers and events, according to Walter R. 
Crawford, food and hospitality student from Selinsgrove. 

The next meeting is scheduled for 10 a.m. this Friday. 

All food and hospitality management students as well as all dietetic 
technician students are invited to attend. Crawford said. ■■■ 




CAROLYN KIZER 



FLOWER SHOW TRIP 
A POSSIBILITY 



the Wllliamsport Foundation. 

Admission for the reading/lecture 
Is free to students and staff with a 
validated College ID, For the four 



by the College Activities Office person- 
nel. Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator, reported at week's end. 

She said the estimated cost is $32 



. ., .. .„. . ,E 1, .„ - which includes transportation, lunch, 
presentations, the admission is -5. It is ^^^ ,^^|^g,^ ,^ ,^g ,1^^^^ ^^^^^ 



$2 for a single event, payable at the 



Those interested may contact her 



door. These fees also include the by calling College Ext. 7269 or drop- 
author party. ping by the office in the Gym. she 

More information Is available by said. ■■■ 

calling327-4763, Ext. 7269. ■■■ 

Human Service Club plans party 
for underprivileged kids 

The Human Service Club will hold a Christmas party for several area 
economically underprivileged children at 2 p.m.. Saturday, Dec. 20 in the 
Bethune-Douglass Center In Wllliamsport. according to Maria C. Casale, coor- 
dinator for the Peer Information and Referral Center (PIRC). 

Activities planned for the party include singing carols, games, 
refreshments, and Christmas cartoons. 

Ms. Casale, who is a human services student from Williamsport, said, 
"There will also be a visit from someone very near and dear to all of us - Santa 
Clausl" 

Ms. Casale said her group Is inviting anyone Interested in helping with the 
activity to call PIRC at College Ext. 7484 or to stop by the Center, which Is 
"just around the corner from the Weight Room on the first floor of the Gym- 
nasium". 

She said the club "Is particularly In need of an Individual who can play the 
guitar or the piano." ■■■ 

GOVERNANCE MEETINGS THIS WEEK 

Currently posted meetings of the College Council and committees within 
the Internal Governance Structure include; 

Curriculum Committee. 3:30 p.m.. Tuesday. Dec. 2, Room 120, Building 
Trades Center. 

Academic Standards and Issues Committee. 9 a.m.. Tuesday. Dec. 2. 
Room 205A, Lifelong Education Center. 

Student Affairs Committee. 3:40 p.m.. Thursday, Dec. 4, Room 220, 
Lifelong Education Center. 

Long Range Planning Committee, not meeting this week. 

Human Resources Committee, 3 p.m.. Wednesday. Dec. 3. Room 205A. 
Lifelong Education Center. 

College Council, not meeting this week. 



SATURDAY TRIP REMINDER GIVEN 

A reminder about this Saturday's bus trip to New York City was issued at 
week's end by Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti. College activities coordinator. 

The bus leaves the Learning Resources Center parking lot "promptly" at 6 
a.m.. she emphasized. "While there are no stops en route, there are restroom 
facilities on the bus." she added. ■■■ 



TIMESHEETS DUE DEC. 12 

TImesheets for work study students must be submitted to the Finan- 
cial Aid Office no later than 9 a.m. Friday, Dec. 1 2, according to Mrs. Edna 
F. Relff, financial aid assistant. ■■■ 

PBL MEETS TODAY; PARTY THURSDAY 

Phi Beta Lambda, the College's business-oriented fraternity, will meet at 
3:30 p.m. today In Room 329. Academic Center. 

On Thursday, the group will host its annual Christmas party for students, 
faculty, and staff of the Business and Computer Technologies Division, accor- 
ding to Paul W. Goldfeder, campus chapter adviser. 

A formal dinner-dance will be held by the organization this Sunday. ■■■ 

S.M.I.LE. MEETINGS SET 

S.M.I.L.E. (Single Mates in Life's Evolution), a support group for single 
parents, will meet on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 1 1 a.m. to noon in Room 
B107, Lifelong Education Center. Ail single parent students are Invited to par- 
ticipate. Additional information is available from Cheri Hilton. College Ext. 
7449. ■■■ 



It's finals! Come see us if you 
need support: Peer Center 

At written by Marli Casals, coordinator 
Paar Information and Rafarral Canter 

"With finals week approaching, we at the Peer Information and Referral 
Center welcome any students experiencing difficulties to drop in and see us. 

"We are here to lend an ear and to give you support when you feel the 
need to let off steam. 

"We can offer much Information and also can head you in the director of 
places to aid you in your studying habits. 

"Please feel free to stop by anytime. We're here for you and we urge you 
to take full advantage of the services we offer. Good luck!" ■■■ 

New books in College Library 

Information supplied by Collage Library personnel 

New books inthe College Library include: 

-Radical Departures: Desperate Detours to Growing Up by Saul Levine 
-a psychiatrist describes the need for community and commitment that 
motivates young adults to join religiuous cults, political fringe groups, and 
therapeutic communes. 

Grafts tor the Very Disabled ar)d Handicapped by Jane Kay - a collection 
of craft projects simple enough for the very handicapped yet designed to hold 
the interest of adults. 

Understanding and Programmable Controllers by Thomas Kissell - an in- 
troductory look at programmable controllers with a variety of programming ex- 
amples which can be applied to a wide range of machines and operations. 

America in Vietnam: A Documentary History edited by William Appleman 
Williams and others - a collection of essays and documents which form an 
essential source book for anyone trying to understand the causes, characters, 
and consequences of American involvement in Vietnam. 

For holiday reading, there are two additions to the paperback collec- 
tion: 

Lace, by Shirley Conran - the sensational best-seller and the basis of the 
TV mini-series. 

The Magic Kingdom, by Stanley Elkins - a comic-tragic fable of seven ter- 
minally ill children chosen for a trip to Disney World ■■■ 

SPOTLIGHT 
Tuesday. Dec. 2. 19S6. * VoL22. No.15 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday morning of the academic year, except lor 
College vacations, by journalism and other Interested students of The Wiiltamsporl Area 
Community College 

Office Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W Third St , Williamsport, Pa 17701 
Telephone (7 1 7| 326-3761 , Extension 7533 



-u 



1% 



STUDENT PUBLICATION « WILLIAMSPORT 
AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

SPOTLIGHT 

MONDAY*DECEMBERe, ItSe •VOL.2 2, NO. 16 * 8PAQES 




0^^0000i^0^0000i!f)1lf)01!f>1lf>00if[i0000^0iS><$}1!fiiS>^0lS>^^^^0^00^ 



ZaSPOTUGHTDMoadi;, Dw. I, IM4. 



So ya' gotta tell 'em about 
the birds and the bees...? 



Well, don't forget the part 
about - Computer Mating!!! 




Commantiry on Talavltlon 

By Brandt M. VIbart 

Of Th* SPOTLIGHT Staff 



On television, Monday through Friday afternoons, there is a wonderfully 
hilarious program called "Love Connection". This program uses the concept 
of computer dating and takes it a step further. II brings this process into the 
homes of television viewers. 

Some of the contestants are a riot: 

1 A 25-year-old guy who was "living in the fifties" came on the show 
wearing a leather jacket, rolled-up collar, ducktaii and a Bronx accent straight 
from "West Side Story". 

2. A particularly finicky woman In her forties used a "checklist" to quiz 
potential dates.The questions ranged from "What is your favorite restaurant to 
take a lady to?" to "What is your bank account?" 

3. A rather attractive but idiotic woman in her thirties who had a father 
willing to put up $25,000 as a marriage settlement. Is dowry back in vogue? 

4. A high class woman in her twenties who would only go out If her date 
would spend at least $100 on her. / wonder how she will like being an "old 
maid"? 

There are also some "normal" people who appear on "Love Connection". 
The show can be amusing as well boring; in general, it's quite entertaining. 

Computer dating began In an era of the sexual revolution, the wrap-up of 
the Vietnam War, and the birth of new individual freedom. 

There are good points and bad points connected to this new "national 
past-time." 

For many people, computer dating takes the hassle out of endlessly sear- 
ching for suitable companions, and prospective candidates can be screened 
and accepted, or rejected with no personal contact between these two people. 

Sometimes this means no bruised egos. On the con side, just because 
dates can be pre-selected to fit our own personal tastes does not mean instant 
compatibility. Remember the plans of mice and men? 

Even though some affairs should be left up to chance, I am willing to con- 
cede that "Love Connection" and computer dating is a facet of life whose time 
has arrived. 



MTV: unwelcome in lounge 



Commentary by Cathy Hannon, of Tha SPOTLIGHT Staff 

l\^TV and studying don't mix. Especially not at the volume it usually is in 
the lounge in the Academic Center. 

Every time I've gone to the lounge, N/ITV has been on what seems like full 
blast. I definitely think the volume has to be turned downl! Sometimes II is so 
loud in there, people have to practically scream to talk to each other. 

The loud volume of MJ\/ can be a nuisance for people trying to study. It's 
hard to concentrate on your work when you keep hearing the same video s 
again and again. 

The only place some students have time to go and study (where they can 



also eat) is the student lounge. I don't think if s fair for these to only be able to 
study there, and have to listen to loud rock videos. I imagine the students who 
are trying to study there are not learning anything, except what videos are 
popular. 

If others who don't have to study are going to play liilTV In the lounge, 
they should at least have some consideration for the people who are trying to 
study. If they don't show some consideration, people trying to study will have 
to leave, and that's a shame. 

I hope both the I^TV watchers and the people trying to study can work 
things out so that everyone can enjoy the lounge, without violating each 
others' rights. 



Poaching is stealing from posterity! 



Of all the controversy over hunting printed in The SPOTLIGHT recently, 
one subject not touched is poaching, the Illegal killing of wild animals - chiefly 
deer. 

Although the penaltly lor killing deer out of season is $200 per animal, 
night hunting continues to take heavy toll on the deer herd of this state. 

Bernard J. Schmader, district game protector of Union County says, 
"Fines alone are not enough of a deterrent to keep some chronic offenders 
from repealing their crimes... before a fine can be imposed, the offender must 
be caught and successfully prosecuted; that just doesn't happen often enough 



Commentary 

By Ruth Ann Hlxson 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 



to threaten the professional poacher." 

The time has come to drop the "clean crime" approach to poaching and 
put it in the class where it belongs-with thievery. It is time for individuals to 
cooperate with authorities to put an end to this illegal acivity. 

According to Schmader, "every honest citizen wants the law to catch a 
thief, a robber, or other criminal. But few people care about or are willing to 
assist a conservation agency's efforts to enforce wildlife laws." 

Poaching is stealing, from posterity and from legal hunters. Isn't it time to 
treat it as the crime it is-armed robbery!! 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Dae. 8, 1981. * Vol. 22, No.ie 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday morning of the academic year, except (or 
College vacations, by journalism and other Interested students ot The Wllllamsport Area 
Community College 

Ofllce: Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 W Third St , Wllllamsport Pa 17701 
Telephone (717) 326-3761, Extension 7533 



The SPOTLIGHT is a member o1 the Columbia Scholastic Press Associatior} 



. Donna L Trimble. 



STAFF 

Kathy L, Cobb, Managing Editor. Btenda M VIbert, Associate Editt.. „,„ 

Photography Editor, Michael Waidron, Advertising Director; Lisa R, Lombard Chiet Com- 
positor. Marge M. DiNardo, Production Managei 

REPORTERS/STAFF ASSISTANTS 

Catherine A. Hannon. Ruth Ann Hlxson, Marc A Varano, Todd A Patterson, Janlne M 
Sullivan, Diane L Shaheen. Margie E Flanagan, and James T Doan 

Contributing Faculty Advlur: Anthony N. Clllo. associate prolessor ol lournallsm 

The SPOTLIGHT gratetully acknowledges the assistance of 
Dale L Metzher. associate prolessor ol graphic arts 



Settle debts, says Security! 

Before the end of the semester - which is this Friday - students ano 
others should "settle their debts", stressed Chief of Security Cecil Cryder last 
week. 

Any student who has a library fine, a campus motor vehicle ticket, or 
other unpaid obligation faces imposition of a "Records Hold", the security of- 
ficer said. 

The "hold", he explained, has the "impact of causing a delay for students 
whose prospective employers might want a copy of a transcript - or who 
might want a transcript to go to another college". 

He noted, too, that some students "forget" to return borrowed instruc- 
tional equipment with the intent of returning it after the semester break. "It's 
better to do it now," he emphasized, adding, "Too much happens during that 
vacation. The equipment might be lost or stolen - and the student then is even 
more in debt." 



SPOTUGHTDMoidar, Dtt. t, 1«M.d3 
\ 



New director of College 
Foundation at work on campus 

Ms. Anne Barilar is the new executive director of the College Foundation. 
She is responsible for fund raising and solicltalon of corporations and in- 
dustries in the area. 

Ms. Barilar then coordinates those funds for scholarships and Interna- 
tional education. She also responsible for encouraging alumni to give their 
financial support. 

Ms. Barilar was marketing officer of the Jersey Shore State Bank in 
Wililamsport. She was Chamber of Commerce chairperson of member rela- 
tions, an American Cancer Society chairperson In charge of funds, and she 
organized Monte Carlo event in May of 1 985. 

She was also a "loaned" executive from a business to work for the United 
Way on their allocations community. She was responsible for getting funds to 
33 different agencies. 

Ms. Barilar said,"l have always been interested In College, as I feel it is a 
great asset to the city." 

"I am proud of what the College has accomplished and would like to be 
part of Its future. My goals here are to help finish programs already going and 
to start new ones as needed," Ms. Barilar stated. 

"I think we need to make people aware of and educate the community to 
what the College is all about," she added. 

In keeping with this thought, Ms. Barilar Is organizing a special golf outing 
In May 1 987 for sponsors from corporations and businesses In the area to start 
a scholarship program. 

Ms. Barilar is from the Wililamsport area. 

She was a 1982 graduate of Bloomsburg University. 



Text and Photo by Donna L. Trimble 
Of The SPOTLIGHT STAFF 




The making of Captain EO' is very creative 



Television Commootary by Diane Shaheen, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Like most of Wililamsport, I was given access to the Disney Channel for a 
week. After looking through the Disney Magazine, I decided to watch "The 
Making of Captain EO. directed by Francis Ford Coppola. 

The show was very creative. It starred Michael Jackson, three costumed 
humans, two mechanical beings, and Anjelica Huston as the bad witch. The 
program showed in brief detail how each segment was developed, designed 
and produced. 

Captain EO is a 1 7-mlnute, 3-D space fantasy movie, whose presentation 



Is seen only in newly-built theatres at the Disney Amusement Parks. 

The hostess of the documentary Is Whoopie Goldberg. She was a sheer 
delight. Her voice is very pleasant to listen to and her sense of humor Is one-of- 
a-kind. 

Music, dancing, robots, special effects, top producers, directors, 
designers, and artists combines, will certainly encourage hordes of crowds to 
the new addition of Disneyland and Disney World. Especially if they view the 
special presentation on television first. 



Governance seeking students 
to serve on comnnittee 

As submlNed by Ma. Veronica M. Muzic, chairperson of the College Council 

Governance is seeking interested, capable students willing to serve on a 
committee. Currently, one position is open on the Long Range Planning Com- 
mittee; beyond that one slot, nominations will be held as a pool to fill any 
subsequent vacations. 

Staff and students are invited to submit nominations to V. Muzic (ACC 
317) by this Friday, Dec. 1 2. 

The nomination should be shared with the student-nominee to ensure that 
the student is interested in serving. Responsibilities include attendance at 
meetings (minimum of one meeting each month) and preparation for meetings 
which will include reading and review of back-up material. 

Most meetings will be scheduled during the College Hour which Is on 
Tuesdays from 3:30 to 5 p.m. 

The nomination should include the following information: Name, cur- 
riculum, student's status (In what semester he/she Is currently enrolled), mail- 
ing address. 

Questions about the vacancy or about the Long Range Planning Commit- 
tee may be addressed to Veronica Muzic or to James Logue [ACC 31 7]. 



• •Letters* • 

To SPOTLIGHT Readers: 

We all voice our opinions when we don't agree, but how about when we 
strongly agree with the person? 

The article that Ruth Ann Hixon wrote is so true in most places. 
I'm not entirely against smoking, but it Is so unpleasant when you walk In- 
to a room filled of smoke. 

If nonsmokers could have a place In public places, and some smokers 
would just try to be a little more careful and considerate it would be a much 
more pleasant place tor all. 

- MIka Waldron 

business management student 

from Muncy 

iFREE PIlIAll 



C.E.N.O. 

CAREER EXPLORATION IN NONTRADITIONAL OCCUPATIONS MEETINQ FOR 
STUDENTS ENROLLED IN NONTRADITIONAL PROGRAMS (sccording to 
gender),T0M0RR0W, TUESDAY. DEC. S, 3:30 P.M., ROOM 321, ACADEMIC CENTER. 



I Buy any size Little Caesars 

■ Original rotind pizza at regular 
price, get the identical pizza 
■ FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-«M0 



W.A.C.C. itBtati liTc 
addHloull*% ori; wltk 
ilital !.D. uilUfi. 



One coupon per customer. Cany out only At parMctpatlng locations. 



4aSI>OTUGHTDMoiiUy. Dec. I, »M 

New books in the college library... 

FICTION: 

Prizzi's Honor by Richard Condon — an outrageous and original love 
story, ttie basis of Itie award-winning film. 

Zemindar by Valerie Fitzgerald — a saga of love and war set in exotic col- 
onial India. 

NON-FICTION 

Jesus through the Centuries by Jaroslav Pelil<an — an examination of the 
impact of Jesus not only on ttie culture but also the political, social, and 
economic history of two thousand years. 

The Tentative Pregnancy by Barbara Katz Rothman — a provocative 
discussion of the way prenatal tests, particularly amniocentesis, is transform- 
ing the relationships between parents and their unborn children. 

Technical Aspects ol Data Communication — a practical, updated ap- 
proach to the problems and solutions of configuring communications systems. 

Louis Sullivan: His Lite and Work by Robert Twombly — a new biography 
of a founding father of modern American architecture, who rose to great fame 
but died nearly destitute. 



High... 

...DIE... 

...Cry. 

Drive Sober Keep Christmas Happy 




CA$H 
For 
Your 
Books! 



CLOTH OR PAPER - WHETHER USED ON THIS CAMPUS OR HOT. 
WE BUY ALL TITLES HAVING RESALE MARKET VALUE! 

SELL THEM AT: 



The Bookstore 

-^ Also f lea MARKE.T 



I Thur. Dec. 11 & Fri. Dec. 12 
! 9:00 - 12:00 & 2:00 - 4:00 
j Mon. Dec. 15 

L 9:00 - 12:00 



THURSOAYOtC.il 6:00-8:00 PM 




CHOMP, CHOMP - Last Thursday, the Human Ssrvlces Club held a turkey 
sandwich luncheon sale In the Academic Center lobby. Here, patrlcia A. 
Knull, president of the club who Is a human services student from 
Wllllamsport, and Maria C. Casale, coordinator of the Peer Information 
Referral Canter and also a human services student from Wllllamsport, 
serve several hungry students. According to Ms. Knull, the proceeds will 
be used for a Christmas party the group has planned for children of the 
local Patrona of the Friends of the Court. [SPOTLIGHT photo] 

Carolyn Kizer's workshop postponed; 
Women's Series to begin in February 

Carolyn Kizer's workshop, the first of four of the Women's Series, which 
was scheduled for last Wednesday, has been postponed, according to Ms. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti. College activities coordinator. 

Other reading/lectures and workshops are scheduled for the Spring 
semester, Ms. Fremiotti said. 

Scheduled are: Marge Piercy, teacher, lecturer, and consultant; Maya 
Angelou, educator, songwriter, and playwright; and Lynne Sharon Schwartz, 
editor, writer, and translator. 

Ms. Kizer's workshop will be rescheduled in the Spring semester, Ms. 
Fremiotti said. 




WOMEN'S SERIES 
PARTICIPANTS in- 
clude, clockwise from 
lower left, Lynn Sharon 
Schwartz, Marge Pier- 
cy, and Maya Angelou . 
[Courtesy Photos] 



SPOTUGHTDMondir, Dec. 8, im.aS 

What is... Career Exploration in Nontraditional Occupations...? 



Submittal by C.E.N.O. p«rtonn«l and pratentad at writtan 

Career Exploration in Nontraditional Occupations, C.E.N.O., is a Penn- 
sylvania Department of Education state funded sex equity vocational educa- 
tion grant program vidiose office is located on campus in Room 333 of tfie 
Academic Center. 

The purpose of C.E.N.O. is to provide career education and awareness 
programming in nontraditional occupations according to gender. Specific em- 
pfiasis is placed on discussion of sexual stereotyping and sexual bias. 

Seminars are offered to high school youth across the College's ten county 
service area, community adults, college students, and business and industry 
personnel. The seminars are designed to make the participants aw/are of 
employment trends in the area vi'ith emphasis on nontraditional occupations. 
The participants attention is focused upon the career opportunities, as well as 
the mechanisms for coping with sexual stereotyping in the work force. 

A total of five seminars were offered in November. An adult seminar was 
held of campus on Nov. 12, and high school seminars were conducted at 
Elkland, West Snyder, Hughesville, and Ivllddleburg. Before Christmas break, 
high school seminars will be held Troy, Canton, and Williamsport High 
Schools. Along with discussion activities, Interest and ability testing Is done. 

5".-sr..s;«5«*..5;4,!s,.rc..!B,,w»Wi.5;..S..S..*..S..«..S«5.,?..¥.,t:MS«f;..*,.«..«..54 

I ^ 




The participants are also provided with the opportunity to come back at a later 
date to participate In a hands-on experience in nontraditional college program 
areas. 

Counseling and support services are available to secondary and post- 
secondary students enrolled in nontraditional programs according to gender at 
the College. This semester a group of nontraditional students formed a support 
group which met once a week. The primary focus of the meetings concerned 
problems the students were facing in relation to their program choice and 
methods of coping with these problems. 

Plans which are being made for the next semester's meetings include: 
guest speakers who work in nontraditional occupations, job search informa- 
tion, and taking part in the College Open House. All student enrolled in non- 
traditional programs are invited to attend these meetings. 

If anyone has any questions regarding C.E.N.O., please feel free to con- 
tact Ms. Sharon K. HItesman, coordinator of Career Exploration in Nontradi- 
tional Occupation, Room 333 ACC, Extension 7249, or Mrs. Sharon A. 
Doebler, program assistant/C.E.N.O., Extension 7552. 



"It's a circus without animal 
smells; vaudeville without 
a dialog..." 



Chinese Golden Drago 
Acrobats & Magicians 
of Taipai 



n 



Saturday, January 10 
7:30 p.m. 

Scottish Rite Auditorium 
In Williamsport 



* Ring of Fire & Swords 

* Precision Juggling 

* Pagoda of Chairs 

* Incredible Juggling 

* The Dancing Lions 





* Feats of Balance 

* Kung-Fu 

* Chl-Kung 

Tickets: 

D $5.00 general admission 

D $3.00 for children under 12 

For tickets and Information, call ttie College at (717) 327-4763. ext, 7269 or tlie YWCA at 
322-4637. Or, send a ctieck wltti name, address and telephone number to: College Actvitles, 
1 005 West Third Street, Wllllamspon, PA 1 7701 



WILLIAMSPORT 
AREA 

COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE 

IOCS West Third Street • Williamsport, PA 17701-5799 



Sponsored by the Williamsport Area Community College, the Williamsport 
YWCA and the Greater Williamsport Community Arts Council and supported by a grant 
from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the Wllllamaport 
Foundatkjn. 




oim:*:»;:»:*mmzmrM:m:wM^^ 



daSPOTUGHTDMoidiJ, D«. «, 1M« 

Governance meetings set 
during hoiiday break 

Meeting times have been posted for the College Council and committees 
within the Internal Governance System for the holiday break as follows: 

During the week of Dec. 1 5 to 1 9, the following groups will meet: 

College Council Executive Committee and committee chairs, 2 p.m., 
fvlonday, Dec. 1 5, Room 220, Lifelong Education Center. 

Academic Standards and Issues Committee, 1 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 
1 7, Room 1 53, Learning Resources Center. 

Curriculum Committee, 1 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 17, Room 155, Learn- 
ing Resources Center. 

Human Resources Committee, 1 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 18, Room 151, 
Learning Resources Center. 

Long Range Planning Committee, 1 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 18, Room 155, 
Learning Resources Center. 

Student Affairs Committee, 1 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 18, Room 153, Learn- 
ing Resources Center. 

College Council, 8 a.m., Friday, Dec. 19, Susquehanna Room. 

During the week of Jan. 5 to 9, the following groups wlli meet: 

Academic Standards and Issues Committee, 10 a.m., f^onday, Jan. 5, 
Room 1 53, Learning Resources Center. 

Curriculum Committee, 10 a.m., f^onday, Jan. 5, Room 155, Learning 
Resources Center. 

Long Range Planning Committee, 2 p.m., Monday, Jan 5, Room 153, 
Learning Resources Center. 

Student Affairs Committee, 9 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 8, Room 1 53, Learning 
Resources Center, 

Human Resources Committee, 1 0:30 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 8, Room 1 55, 
Learning Resources Center. 

College Council, 2 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 8, Room 153, Learning 
Resources Center. 

All College (Governance) meeting, 9 a.m., Friday, Jan. 9, Academic 
Center Auditorium. 




A HELPING HAND - Annette M. Long, liuman 
services student from Wllllamsport, sold baked 
goods last Thursday In conjunction with the 
Human Services Club and the local Friends of 
the Court. Miss Long, shown helping a youthful 
customer who was not Identified, said the goal 
was to malie money for a Christmas party for 
children of the Patrons of the Friends of the 
Court. She said anyone wishing to donate toys 
tor children 10 and older may drop them off at 
the Peer information Referral Canter in the 
Gymnasium. [SPOTLIGHT photo] 



SGA endorses scholarship proposal 

The Student Government Association endorsed a proposal brought 
before It last Tuesday. Dec. 2. by Donald S. Shade, director of financial aid, ac- 
cording to Kathy L. Cobb, SGA treasurer. 

Shade presented a proposal which, upon Implementation, would expand 
the College's scholarship program. 

Shade said that the proposal Includes a 50 cent Increase In the College 
activities fee. 

"The additional revenue would be used to expand the scholarship pro- 
gram," he said. 

Currently, the College offers 20 scholarships worth $500 each to incom- 
ing and current students. 



Shade said that it the new proposal were adopted, the College would be 
able to offer 95 scholarships. 

"We are trying to meet the needs of all students, particularly since the new 
sponsorship framework allows for only 20 percent of the students to be spon- 
sored, and 80 percent to be non-sponsored." 

He added, "It has been almost five years since the College Activities fee 
has been increased. In 1 982-83, the fee went from a flat rate to a per credit 
rate." 

Shade said the proposal would go to the Student Affairs Committee within 
the Governance Structure for endorsement, and on up the chain of command 
before actual Implementation. 



Copy machines available 

Coin-operated copy machines are located In the College Library (LEC), 
the first floor of the Academic Center, the Earth Science Center, and the North 
Campus, according to Mrs. Judith A. Winder, manager of duplicating and mail 
services. 

These machines can be used by all students. Mrs. Winder said the 
copiers make change for a quarter. Copies are 10* each.. 

Mrs. Winder suggested operators should only make one copy to start 
with, to be sure the copy comes out clear. "Please read the directions before 
you operate the machines," she said. 



SHOVELER WANTED 
Student who will be In town over hoii- 
day: We have opportunity for you! 
Shovel snow; build muscles. Caii 
323-3988 aller 6 p.m. [Advt] 



Pregnant? Considering Adoption? 

Free Counseling. Medical, Housing 
• £*peiienced Caring Siaff 

>nlicjenlial and Personal Allenlion 



CiUo's 
College 



HOURS* 
Mon. thm Than. 
7:30 i.m. lo ( p.m. 

Corner vmmj, tm (.m. to 4 ^.d 

1100 W. Third St. 



LUNCH SPECIAJ. 

THIS WEEK 
REGULAR SUB 

Whole $2.00 

Reg. $2.40 



PHONE 
322-1321 



"*«, 



IbrSkfast spec 
this week 

sausage • cheese 
egg • on • muffin 

$1.35T«i.d»d«) Reg. $1.65 





SPOTLIGHTaMoida;, Dec. t, IWi.D i 



Word Search 

Find the Construction Carpentry Students 



:rob] mckendrick 
:scott] bierly 
:bob: hoobler 
[george] fields 
[stephen] riemer 

[BOB] KIRtNER 
[TIMOTHY] SULLIVAN 
[ROBERT] 6UNSALLUS 
[KEVIN] MCGEE 
[BRIAN] BURh: 

NAMES COLLECTED BY BOB HOOBLER. 



[9TEVE] QENSITS 
[SCOTT] GOOD 
CWADE] PATTERSON 
CMIKE] SCHNELL 
[BRAD] SPOTTS 
[STEVE] YANCHIK 
[RANDY] GILLESP[E 
[ANDY] SHILLINOSFORD 
[JEFF] THOMPSON 



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4 5 6 ^m) 8 9 16 11 \i 13 14 


15 


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17 


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19 


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UP 


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31 


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50 


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59 










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65 


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us Collegiate CH84-10 



ACROSS 

1 Histake 
7 Threw away 

15 Beach hut 

16 Broadway event 

nate point 
IS Certain accountant 

19 197; wo«en's 
Uimbledon champ 

20 Near the back 

22 Shoot the breeze 

23 Albanian, Bulgarii 

24 Japanese War 

25 Got up 

29 school 

30 Mr. Earp 

31 Social outcast 
33 Loved ones 

35 Carroll of TV or 

Donald of movies 

37 Skip I 



53 Shaver sound 

54 William Peter 

55 Ali 

59 Kill as a sacrifici 
61 Heretofore, 
poetically 

64 Canadian city 

65 Caution in advance 

66 Uith precision 



3 Footnote abbrevi- 
ation 

4 Call for 

5 Prefix for cycl 

6 Raccoon's n 

7 Started, as 

8 Medieval wai 

9 Fortificati 



26 I 



the 



lativ 



43 Cwnforti 

44 "...poem 
47 Canadian 

(abbr.) 

49 Plant in 

50 Cafeterii 

51 Annoy 



strengtl 
ble (Z W( 



10 Vellow dye 
.) II Theatre sect 
" 12 City in Illii 

13 l^andering 

14 Autocrat 
21 Eel -shaped 

amphibian 
23 College cap 



military 

27 Spanish gold 

28 Famous sex expert 
30 's cramp 

32 Term of endearment 
34 Alias initials 
36 Certain firearm 

38 Famous Hunter 

39 Compass point 

40 Steinbeck's "The 

42 sandwich 

44 "To Catch " 

45 Screenwriter 
Dal ton 

46 Driving machine 
48 Phone Co. initials 

51 " Suite" 

52 Keep an 

(watch) 

54 Homonym of a color 

55 rays 

56 College subject 



58 On vacat'on 

60 United 

62 Highway (sbbr.) 



Ihis fVeek's Puzzle Brought to You By... 

Cathy's Diner 

1170 W. 4lh St. • Williimsport, Pa. 17701 • Phone 323-3224 



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A free turkey clrawing was held last week by Itie Student Government Association, ac- 
cording William J. Fritz, SGA president and plumbing and heating student from Homer City. 

Seven turkey certificates, worth $1 5 each, were awarded. Recipients were Andrea P. 
Bralm, human services. Linden; Darlene E. Dean, computer operations, Williamsport; Steven 
A. Jones, plumbing and heating. Hanover; Lloyd C. Jordan, auto body, Mildred; Todd N. 
Bacon, nursery management, Towanda; and Clair E. Stephenson, Jr., avaiation maintenance 
technician, York Haven. 

According to Kathy L. Cobb, SGA treasurer, a North Campus winner will be determined 
after the Thanksgiving holiday, and a certificate will be awarded for a Christmas turkey. 

Winners randomly selected from entry blanks which were collected during the week of 
Nov. 17 to 22. 

The certificates are redeemable at any Acme/Super Saver supermarket. 



SaSPOTUGBTDMnMli;, Dtc. I, 1*M. 



PBL making plans 
for new sennester; 
used book sale 
to be held 



Several Phi Beta Lambda ofllcers will be graduating this month, so it will 
be necessary to replace them, according to Paul W. Goldfeder, Phi Beta 
Lambda state adviser. 

A vacancy will occur In the offices of vice president, secretary, and ad- 
ministrative aide. New members Joining PBL In January will be eligible to fill 
these positions. 

Plans are being completed for the used book sale to be held In the club of- 
fice. Room 3 of the Academic Center, on the week of Jan. 12. 

GoWfeder added, "Any students wishing to sell their books may bring 
them to the office for listing and for sale. 

Lisa A. Folmar, treasurer, arxj business management student from Mon- 
toursville, will be In charge of the used book sale. 



Governance 
units meeting 
this week 

Scheduled meetings of the Col- 
lege Council and committees for the In- 
ternal Governnce System for this week 
Include: 

Curriculum Committee, not 
meeting this week. 

Academic Standards and Issues 
Committee, not meeting this week. 

Student Affairs Committee, 
meeting time not determined. 

Long Range Planning Committee, 
3 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 10. Room 
220, Lifelong Education Center, 

Human Resources Committee, not 
meeting this week. 

College Council, 3:30 p.m., Thurs- 
day, Dec. 11. Room 321, Academic 
Center 

SME meeting 
to be tonight 

Chapter 49, Society ol 
Manufacturing Engineers, will 
meet this evening (or dinner, for 
the Christmas party, and to hear 
a guest speaker. 

According to an announce- 
ment by Lawrence H. Graczyk, 
machine tool technology instruc- 
tor, the group will meet at 6:30 
p.m. at the Sheraton In downtown 
Williamsport (or dinner. 

Later, the speaker will be 
Clark Andrews, who is an 
amateur astronomer and 
member of the British 
Astronomical Society. 



'Beat the Score' wins posted 

winners In the "Beat the High Score" competition (or the week of Nov. 24 
through 26 are James F. Eboch, civil engineering technology, Morrlsdale, 
423,190, Paragon, and John R. Leitner, food and hospitality, Wlnfleld, 
339,750, Mat Mania. 

Winners receive UA movie tickets or free video game tokens. 

According to William J. Fritz, SGA president and plumbing and heating 
student from Homer City, "Beat the High Score" is held every week in the Rec 
Center and Is sponsored by the Student Government Association. 



Elevators for handicapped, director says 

The elevators in the Academic Emery said, "Persons who do not 

Center and the Learning Resources have handicaps should not use the 

Center are for handicapped persons elevators as the extra wear and tear 

who cannot use the stairs, according to means more down time for service." 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of ad- He added, "Your cooperation 

visemeni and career services vi/ouid be appreciated " 



SGA to meet; 
elect new officer 

The Student Government 
Association Senate will meet tomorrow 
to elect a new vice president, and to 
approve two new senators, according 
to Kathy L. Cobb. SGA treasurer. 

The special meeting, scheduled to 
be held at 5 p.m.. In the Lifelong 
Education Center, was called after the 
SGA learned that Maria I. Herold, 
general studies student from Selln- 
sgrove, planned to resign. 

Mrs. Herold said she Is moving out 
of the area and therefore cannot com- 
plete her SGA duties. 

Mrs. Herold served as vice presi- 
dent since last September. 



Job Ops 

The Sun-Gazette has an opening 
tor a truck driver from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. 
Monday through Saturday. Stop by the 
newspaper at Hepburn and Fourth and 
fill out an application. 



The Quality Inn in South 
Williamsport has a part-time opening 
for a desk clerk. Needs someone 3 to 
11 p.m. Saturday and 7 a.m. to 3 p.m 
Sunday. Must be able to make change 
and be personable. To apply call 
Rebecca at 323-9801 . 

Berninger's Floor Center, 113 W. 
Third St., Wllllamsporl, has an opening 
for either full time or part time tor vinyl, 
ceramic tile and carpet Installers. 
Would consider a student in the 
carpentry program. 



Performing Artist Series 
tickets now availabie 



The Performing Artist Series, 
sponsored by the College, will present 
performances in the Scottish Rite 
Auditorium in Williamsport, on Satur- 
days. Jan. 31 , Feb. 21 . and March 1 4. 

Single prices for the series In- 
clude: A Chorus Line, a Broadway Hit, 
Saturday, Jan. 31. $20 reserved. $15 
non-reserved; Steve Landesburg. 
Saturday, Feb. 21, $15 reserved, $10 
non-reserved, and Maynard Ferguson 



with High Voltage, Saturday, March 1 5, 
$15 reserved, $12 non-reserved. 

Season tickets are $40 for 
patrons, and $35 general admission. 

Season tickets can be obtained by 
stopping in the College Activities 0(- 
(Ice, Room 108, Gym, or by calling 
326-4763, Ext. 7269. 



Christmas hours posted for campus library 

Christmas hours for the College Library have been posted, according to 
Mrs. Kate D. HIckey, director of learning resources. 

The Library will observe regular hours through Friday, Dec. 12. 

Although the Library will be closed Sunday, Dec. 1 4, it will be open 7:30 
a.m. to 5 p.m. the week of Dec. 1 5. 

Other hours will be: closed Dec. 20 through Jan. 4; 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. the 
week of Jan. 5: closed Sunday, Dec. 1 1 , and regular hours resume the first 
day of spring classes, Jan. 1 2. 

Government Surplus 

Military Clothing and Equipment 



Appalachian Outfitters 

15 East Water Street 

Muncy, PA 17772 



Monday - Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Phone 717-546-8296 

H5n5'ii5'(i5)ij5iil5)il5)j5m5)(i5 



Ji.J.J'i'i' X 



X (' .(' ,(' .(■ ,(■ .(■ (■ 



BENSON 

Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 




ALWAYS OPEN - 

ALL NIQHT, 

HOLIDAYS, 

AND SUNDAYS 



Snaeks 

Hoi and CM DrMs 

Gmeeries 

GaaoOu 




llj:.*: ( < (■ i ( 



.(■ ,*■ X X X X X X 



WAv^i^ AK^-nivca 



//r* 




% The Year of the Constitution 

The First Amendment 



SPOTLIGHT 

Monday, Jib. n. 1986 • Vol. i2, No. 17 • 4 Pages 
WiUlanuport Area Commniiil; College • Williamsport, Pa. 17701 





C.H.I.P. AWAY FAT... 
WEIGHT PROGRAM TO BEGIN 

A weight loss program will "officially" start next Wednesday, Jan. 28 --but 
would-be participants should be getting organized into "teams" now, according 
to Mrs. Janet Querimit, College nurse. 

The campus program is part of the Comprehensive Health Improvement 
Program in the county. 

By using friendly competition and person-to-person encouragement, those 
taking part in the program to lose weight can be successful, the nurse said. 

The program will be continued for 12 weeks, ending in mid-April. 

Those interested may call her ~ Mrs. Querimit ~ at College Ext. 7224 or 
visit her in her office on the first floor of the Gym. 

SPOTLIGHT on Mondays; applicants invited 

Beginning today. The SPOTLIGHT resumes its regular Monday 
publication, according to Anthony N. Cillo, faculty adviser. 

Students interested in becoming staff members, he said, may apply 
The SPOTLIGHT office. Room 7, basement. Academic Center, between 3 
and 4 p.m. daily. 



'Welcome Back' says 
Peer Information & Referral Center 

Special Report by Maria Casale 
PIRC Coordinator 

With the start of the semester. The Peer Information and Referral Center 
would like to say hello to all new and returning students. We welcome you and 
wish you the best of luck for this semester. Staffed by fellow peers we share your 
problems and experiences and together we can resolve conflicts. 

During the course of the semester, if you find yourself in need of informa- 
tion or assistance of any kind: we are located in Gym 105 (first floor, Gym- 
nasium). 

We are here to assist you in gaining the proper information or refer you to 
those who can. 

We are open Monday through Friday 9 a.m. through 5 p.m., and are eager 
to assist you. 

Any student wishing to volunteer an hour of time to keep the Center open 
should see Maria Casale, coordinator. Anyone is welcome to stop by and check 
us out. 



laSPOTLlGHTDMondij, lu>. 1», 1»M 



Student Government 
says 'Welcome Back'. 
...and get involved! 



To All W.A.C.C. Students: 

Your Student Government Association would like to 
welcome back all new and returning students. 

SGA is eager to get started this semester, but we need to 
have dedicated willing people to serve on various committees 
that we currently have. 

We have a lot of new positions that need to be filled on both 
the Executive Council and the Senate. This means there will be a 
lot of positions on our committees that need to be filled. 

If you feel the need to be involved or if you have any sugges- 
tions for SGA, please stop by our office located in the Rec Center 
and talk to a representative or attend a Senate meeting. Our 
Senate meetings are open to all W.A.C.C. students. 

Thank you - and have a good semester! 
Sincerely, 

Lynne K. Wesson, vice president 
(business management student from Pine Grove Mills) 



In this year, this country observes the 200th anniversary ol 
the Constitution - the law of the land. 

The Constitution guarantees us. we like to say, our fun- 
damental rights. Among those rights: Free speech, free press. 

The right of free speech - as all rights - is nothing without 
the recognition of the rosponsibllity that goes along with that 
right. 

To protect our rights - Including free speech and a free 
press - requires us to accept the responsibility of guarding the 
rights of others... 

... and of guarding against Insidious assaults upon those 
rights. 

Little by little, If we permit it, this or that power-hungry in- 
dividual will, first, nibble away at our right to free speech and 
tree press. Then, having been permitted to nibble, these in- 
dividuals bite... and bite and bite... Until finally, freedom of the 
press is nothing but a carcass - stripped of any protective mus- 
cle, stripped of any meaning. 

It we permit rationalization - "Sure, Hitler was a maniac, but 
he was just trying to get the German economy back 
together" .."I know the people need to know, but right now, it's 
best that we don't tell everything; security, you know".... 

If we as individual citizens rationalize... "I'm too busy".., 
"It's none of my business",., "They shouldn't print stuff like 
thar ,,, 

If we allow ourselves to be overwhelmed by the frenzied need 
for power,,, by the slothful security of apathy,,, by the need for 
egoism, demanding the perogative to telling all others how to 
speak, how to report, how to communicate,,,. 

We, then, have murdered our right to freedom of the press. 
We have murdered ourselves. 



by 



We still have a choice: 
Protect and keep our freedoms... 

or 

let them be murdered 

megalomania, apathy, and egoism 



Who are they? 

At left are cartoon drawings of two men who often are in the public eye. 
Can you identify them in 15 seconds or less. Good. You get no prize, no ap^ 
plause, no cheers. All you get is a chance to be self-satisfied and smug. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday Jan, 19, 1986 • Vol, 22, No, 17 
The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday morning ol the academic year, ex- 
cept for College vacations, by mass communications and other Interested students 
o( The Williamsport Area Community College 

Otiice Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W Third St, Williamsport Pa 
17701 Telephone (717) 326-3761, Extension 7533 



Opinions expressed are those of the student newspaper or of those whose 
names accompany Items Opinions do not reflect official opinion of the institution. 

The SPOTLIGHT is a member ol 
the Columbia Scholastic Press Association 

LETTERS TO SPOTLIGHT READERS 

Letters to SPOTLIGHT readers should be typed, double-spaced and may be 
hand-earned or sent to the SPOTLIGHT office in the Academic Center Letters will 
be reviewed by the newspaper staff and may be rejected with a statement as to 
reason All letters must be signed signatures must be authenticated by a member 
of the newspaper slafl No leltei will be published without the writer s name 




,-« 




Ip*' 




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mB 




k\1 

SiT^ 'J 


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CPS 




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Search for 1988 
Miss Pennsylvania 
now underway 

Applications are now being ac- 
cepted from all over the Keystone State 
for the annual Miss Pennsylvania USA 
Pageant to be staged this year for the 
third time in Monroeville, in the Grand 
Ballroom of the High Rise Hovfard 
Johnson's Hotel on April 3, 4, and 5, 
1987. 

The Miss Pennsylvania USA 
Pageant is an official Miss USA - Miss 
Universe Contest. 

There is "No Performing Talent" 
requirement, all judging is on the basis 
of poise, personality and beauty of face 
and figure. Entrants who qualify must 
be at least 17 years of age by Feb. 1, 
1988, never married, and at least a six- 
month resident of Pennsylvania; thus, 
college dorm students are eligible. 

All girls interested in competing for 
the title must write to: Miss Penn- 
sylvania USA Pageant, Tri-State 
Headquarters-Dept. S, 347 Locust 
Avenue, Washington, PA 15301-3399 
by Feb. 28th. Letters must include a re- 
cent snapshot, a brief biography and 
phone number. 

Pursuant to the rights granted by 
Miss Universe, Inc., the girl chosen as 
Miss Pennsylvania USA will receive a 
14-day all-expense paid trip to the site 
of the Miss USA Pageant nationally 
televised on CBS-TV eariy in 1988, 
competing for over $200,000 in cash 
and prizes. The new state winner will 
receive a $1,000 cash scholarship and 
will select a $1,000 wardrobe. 

The new winner will be crowned by 
the current Miss Pennsylvania USA, 
Lisa Rynkiewicz of Larksville, who will 
be present for the entire event at the 
High Rise Howard Johnson's Hotel. 

SHOVELER WANTED 

We have opportunity for you! 
Shovel snow; build muscles. Call 
323-3988 after 6 p.m. [Advt] 



Partial tuition 
reimbursement 
open hearing 
to be tomorrow 

An open hearing about Loyalsock 
Twp.'s proposed W.A.C.C. Partial 
Tuition Reimbursement Plan will be 
held tomorrow. 

Anyone interested may attend. 

Observers predict a number of 
students and would-be students as well 
as other township residents will be at the 
session. 

The hearing will be conducted by 
the township board of supervisors which 
meets at 7:30 p.m. in the township 
building. East Third Street and Country 
Club Lane. 

The proposed ordinance, if 
enacted, would provide, among other 
things, reimbursement for township 
residents who attend the Commuiiity 
College of $2,000 during his/her 
lifetime. Requirements to establish 
residency are specified within the pro- 
posal. 

Another of the requirements pro- 
posed is that the student who seeks 
reimbursement must present an official 
College transcript showing that he or 
she completed the courses and attained 
a "C" or better for all courses for 
which reimbursement is requested. 

Editor's Note: A copy of the Plan 
is amiable in the SPOTLIGHT office. 
Room 7, basement, Academic Center. 
SPOTLIGHT readers who wish to 
review the copy may do so this after- 
noon. 



SPOTUGHTDMoBdsr, In. If, 19Md3 



Job Ops 



National Car Rental at the airport 
has an opening for a counter person to 
rent cars Wednesday and Thursday 3:30 
p.m. -11:00 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-4 
p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. -11 p.m., Would 
prefer a first-year student. Apply at air- 
port. 

Architectural technology student 
needed to help with layout of a home. 
Call Robert Baker at 323-1660. 

Summer Employment: 

The Advisement Center has receiv- 
ed information on summer employment 
for students who are in forestry or 
similar environmentally oriented fields 
with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
at the Tioga-Hammond and Cowanes- 
que Lakes Projects in Tioga County. 

Camp Shenandoah, a summer 
camp near Winchester, Va. will inter- 
view on campus for counselors, kitchen 
counselors, maintenance counselor, and 
a nurse if there is enough interest. 

Summer employment opportunities 
are available in Glacier National Park 
for all types of students. 

For more information on any of 
the above, students may go to the Ad- 
visement Center in the Learning 
Resources Center. 




Peter Pan will be flyin' in 

Children's Series opens next month 

A series of performances keynoted to young audiences will begin next 
month under the title, "Children's Series", according to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiot- 
ti, coordinator of College activities. 

The series will include two presentations of "Peter Pan" in April. The per- 
formances will be at the local Young Women's Christian Association and at the 
College's North Campus. 

Mrs. Fremiotti said students interested in working as stage crew for any of 
the productions may contact her at her office on the first floor of the Gym. 

King birthday observed today 

The birthday of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is being 
observed today. 

The Williamsport Post Office and the City Hall were scheduled to be clos- 
ed. Most area banks were also scheduled to be closed today. 

However, Lycoming County offices and the Court House are open. 



College Trustees to meet Feb. 2 

The College Board of Trustees will meet at 8 p.m., Monday, Feb. 2, in the 
board room on the second floor of the Lifelong Education Center. 



H H M I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h h ■ 

rniEE majfAv 

I Buy any size Uttle Caesars 

■ Original round pizza at regular 
price, get the identical pizza 
■ FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 



W.A.C.C. itudeaU nn 
iddidoiul 10% only witk 
itndcDl I.D. ud tUi id. 

One coupon per customer Canv out only At participating locations, jb 



4dSPOTUGHTDMo»iUj, in. 19, 1»M 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday. Jan. 19 through Sunday, Jan. 25 



Meetings 

Student housing meeting will be held Saturday, Jan. 24, at 4 p.m. in Room 
B107, LEC. 

ActiritiM 
All Day Open House/Tea tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 1987 from 8:30 a.m. to 7 
p.m. in Room B107, LEC; sponsored by The Women's Forum. 

Ski trip to Ski Sawmill on Wednesday, Jan. 21, The bus will be leaving at 5:30 
p.m. from in front of the LEC. 

Another Ski trip will be on Wednesday, Jan. 28 and the bus will be leaving 
from the front of the LEC al 5:30 p.m. 

Ski Trip sign-up sheets are available in the Rec Center office, A 137, LEC. 

Phi Beta Lambda meeting... 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 27, Room 329 ACC. 
Open to members and all students. 

SGA executive meeting... 3 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 20, Room A138 LEC. Open to 
SGA officers only. 

SGA Senate meeting... 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 22, Room B107 LEC. Open 
to all students, faculty and stafl'. 

Flower Sale... Horticulture Club, 9 a.m. Friday, Feb. 13, ACC lobby and 
LEC foyer. 

Narcotics Annoymous... meets every Wednesday, 7 p.m., Room BI07 LEC 

City Bus... Students with validated ID may ride at reduced rates. 



W.A.C.C. students who are not members of the YMCA may use the pool dur- 
ing the following hours for a charge of J2 per person with a validated W.A.C.C. 
ID card. 



M-F 


3:00 -4:00 p.m. 


M&W 


8:30 -9:30 p.m. 


Fri. 


7:30 -8:45 p.m. 


Sat. 


1:00 -5:45 p.m. 


Sun. 


12.00 -4:45 p.m. 



UA Movie Tickets now available in the Bookstore for $2.75 each. The cost of 
the ticket has been increased by 25 cents by the UA Theaters. UA ticket sales are 
sponsored by the Student Government Association. 

Student health insurance... forms available at Student Health Services Room 
104 Gym. Cut-off date is Feb. 15. 

Student Health Services... Room 104 Gym. Registered nurse on duty will treat 
minor illness and refer to M.D. or facility most capable of providing additional 
treatment. Hours: 8 - 3:30, Mon. - Fri. 

ID Validation... Now through Jan. 23; hours 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. or by appoint- 
ment in Room A 1 37 LEC, Recreation Center. Those who never had an ID picture 
taken may receive one free on these days. ID replacement will be issued at a cost of 
$10. Health Cards will be updated at validation. 



Phi Beta Lambda reorganizing; new members welcome 



This Special Report based on iitformalion provided by 
Paul W. Ooldfeder, faculty adviser 

Phi Beta Lambda, the business club of the College, is in the process of 
reorganizing for the spring semester. The club is currently recruiting new 
members. Students who are business or computer science majors or who take 
business related subjects are eligible to join. 

Applications are available in the Phi Beta Lambda office, Room 3, lower 
level of the ACC. 

The recruiting period runs from today, Jan. 19 to Friday, Jan. 30. Students 
may stop in the office and pick up an application or a free brochure, explaining 
the benefits of the club. 

The PBL club is now conducting its Semi-Annual Used Book Sale. Many 
required books are available now in the office in Room 3. Students may bring in 
books for sale on the club shelf. Those interested should see one of the club of- 
ficers. . The Used Text Book Sale will run through Friday, Jan. 23. 

Performing Artist Series 
tickets still available 

The Performing Artist Series, sponsored by the College, will present perfor- 
mances in the Scottish Rile Auditorium in Williamsport, on Saturdays, Jan. 31, 
Feb. 21, and March 14. 

Single prices for the series include:.,4 Chorus Line, a Broadway hit, Saturday, 
Jan. 31, $20 reserved,$l5 non-reserved; Steve Landesburg, Saturday, Feb. 21, $15 
reserved, $10 non-reserved; and Maynard Ferguson with High Voltage, Saturday, 
March 15, $15 reserved, $12 non-reserved. 

Season tickets are $40 for patrons, and $35 general admission. 

Season tickets can be obtained by stopping in the College Activities Office, 
Room 108, Gym, or by calling 326-4763, Ext, 7269. 

Season tickets are available to the public at the folowing locations: B&S Pic- 
ture Frames, 400 Market St., Williamsport; the Caboose Restaraunt, 500 Pine St., 
Williamsport; Lexington Book Store, Lewisburg; and the College Activities Office. 



Current officers of Phi Beta Lambda include Martin Green, president, 
business managment student from New Jersey, Lisa Folmar, treasurer, business 
administration student from Montoursville; Shelly Stover, administrative aide, 
general studies student from Jersey Shore; Mariyln Keiss, reporter, word pro- 
cessing student from Jersey Shore; and Susan Bailey, parlimentarian, accounting 
student from Monroeton. 

The first general meeting of Phi Beta Lambda will be held next Tuesday, 
Jan. 27 at 3:30 in Room 329 ACC. The meeting is open to all eligable students 
and previous members. Martin Green, president, will conduct the meeting. 



ABC BOWLING LANES 

1245 Park Avenue (at Rose St.) 



College League Sign-Ups 

Men, Women, or Mixed 
Three Persons per Team 



Cillo's 


LUNCH SPECIAL 


College 


THIS WEEK 

WHOLE REGULAR • SUB 


Corner 


$2.10 WHOLE REQULARLY S2.40 T.> inci 


SPECIAL-SPECIAL: HALF $1.05 


PHONE 322-1321 






Play LUCKY NUMBERS 


1100 W. Third St. 


AND WIN A HALF SUB 


(Next to the Academic Center) 


Four Winners Each Week! 


HOURS* 


^5«SJ^ 


Mod. thru Than. 


BREAKFAST SPECIAm^ 


7:30 t.m. to 6 p.m. 


THIS WEEK -^« 




STEAK * CHEESE * EGG • SUB 


Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 


$1.50 REGULARLY $1 .80 uiKciudM 



Sign Up 
Price $3.25 



IF YOU WANT TO 
BOWL AND THIS 
TIME DOESN'T FIT 
YOUR SCHEDULE, 
PLEASE PHONE FOR 
OTHER TIMES 

AVAILABLE. 



4 P.M., Jan. 27 

Free Shoes 




i Phone 326-2885 for more information 

I Free Trophies and Banquet | 

I Provided by ABC Bowling Lanes I 



s 



Supervisors may act tonight on tuition plan see Page 2 




WACC ARCHIVES 



SPOTLIGHT 



Bloodmobile 
to be here 
in late March 

The Lycoming Chapter of the Red 
Cross Bloodmobile is scheduled to 
visit the Main Campus of the College 
from 9:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. on Tues- 
day, March 24, and Wednesday, 
March 25, according to Ms. Kalhy L. 
Cobb, College activities assistant and 
SGA advisor. 

The Bloodmobile visit is spon- 
sored by the Student Government 
Association and the College Activities 
Office. Ms. Cobb said SGA would like 
to asl< for assistance from other stu- 
dent organizations in obtaining on- 
campus and off-campus blood donors, 
as well as in helping the Red Cross 
with designated duties during the 
Bloodmobile visit. 

Assistance from other student 
organizations is needed so the Blood- 
mobile can be successful. Help at this 
time would be appreciated. Ms Cobb 
said, because the Red Cross has been 
experiencing severe blood shortages. 

She said the SGA would like to in- 
vite student organiazation advisors and 
officers to a special Bloodmobile 
meeting, tentativly scheduled for Tues- 
day, Feb. 24 at 4 p.m. in Room B1 07 in 
the Lifelong Education Center. 

ID CARDS READY 

students who already have had ID 
pictures taken may pick them up in the 
Recreation Center in the Lifetime 
Education Center, according to Ms. 
Kathy L. Cobb, College activities assis- 
tant. 



Tuesday. Jin. 27, 1987 • Vol. 22, No. 18 • 4 Pigei 
WUliimsport Am Commanily Collegt • WiUlimsport, Pa. 17701 





One-two punch 
by snowstorms 
closes College 

A one-two snowstorm punch last 
week forced the closing of the College 
on two separate days. 

The first storm brought an early 
closing last Monday as well as 
cancellation of evening classes that 
day. Then, a bigger storm brought 
about an early closing Thursday and 
complete cancellation of classes on 
Friday. 

According to the National Weather 
Service at Montoursville, 1 5.8 inches 
of snow was recorded as falling in 
Williamsport during the second of the 
storms. 

At the College, an estimated 1 71 
"man hours" were needed to clear 
away the pile-ups of snow. 

No announcement had been made 
as of yesterday about whether or not 
and possibly when there may be a 
make-up day for classes. 



Health Week 
begins next week 

College "Health Week" will be 
staged next week - Monday, Feb. 2 
through Thursday. Feb. 5 - under the 
sponsorship of the Student Health Ser- 
vices and the College Activities Office, 
according to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
College activities coordinator 



IT MAY HAVE BEEN BEASTLY... BUT IT STILL WAS BEAUTIFUL 

SPOTLIGHT Photo by Mary A. Button, of Williamsport 



Performing Artist Series begins Saturday downtown; 
'A Chorus Line' is Series opener 



"A Chorus Line" will be presented 
by Jerry Kravat Entertainment at the 
Scottish Rite Auditorium, 348 Market 
St., in downtown Williamsport. at 8 
p.m., this Saturday as the opening per- 
formance in the College's Performing 
Artists Series, , according to Ms. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, College activities 

Yes, puzzle fans... 
crossword is back! 

starting next week. The 
SPOTLIGHT will resume publication of 
the weekly crossword puzzle. 

Also scheduled for next week's 
issue is another puzzle feature - a 
wordsearch featuring students at the 
College. 



coordinator. 

The original Broadway hit was 
directed and choreographed by 
Michael Bennett. Kimberly Dawn Smith 
will restage the original direction and 



choreography. The executive producer 
for Jerry Kravat Entertainment is Jef- 
fery B. Moss. 

"A Ctrorus Line" is the first of 
three presentations in the College's 



Teaching award nomination forms 
to be available next week 

Forms will be available next week to nominate faculty for the Distinguish- 
ed Teaching Awards, according to Dr. Robert G. Bowers, executive assistant 
for internal affairs. 

The forms - which may be submitted by anyone in the College communi- 
ty - will be available at the Tutonng Center and at the information Desk in the 
Learning Resources Center as well as in the the Financial Aid Office in the 
Academic Center. 

Dr. Bowers commented that at this time, "My main interest Is to create an 
awareness among student body and to motivate students to submit nomina- 
tions." 



Performing Artists Series. 

In addition, Steve Landesberg will 
appear on Feb. 21 and Maynard 
Ferguson, on March 14. 

All performances are to be held in 
the Scottish Rite Auditorium, Ms. 
Fremiotti said. 

Tickets for "A Chorus Line" are 
$20 for reserved seats and $15 for 
unreserved. Season tickets may be 
purchased for $40 for patron and $35 
for general admission. 

Tickets may be purchased at B&S 
picture Frames, 400 Market St 
Williamsport; the Caboose Resturaunt. 
500 Pine St.. Williamsport: the Lexicon, 
318 Market St.. Lewisburg. and at the 
College Activities Office, Room 108, 
Gym, or by calling 326-4763, ext. 
7269. 



iDSPOTUGHTaTiodar, Ju- 27, 1917 



Students picked for Conference; 
sponsors needed to share costs 



Submitted by Jerry E. Neece, broadcastirtg student 
Six students from the College will attend the 1 1 th Annual 
Model United Nations Conference in Cleveland, Ohio, scheduled 
to begin tomorrow. 

They were chosen by Thomas J. E. Walker, associate pro- 
fessor of history and political science, and Robert W. Wolfe, 
associate director of the Integrated Studies Division, 

The students include four general studies students - John D. 
Rue, Janet K. Ulsamer, Jean C. Wool, and Matthew T. Young - 
advertising art student, Teresa L. Wentzler, and a broadcasting 
student, Jerry E. Neece. 



The Cleveland National Model United Nation Conference 
(CNMUNC) is a realistic simulation of an actual session of the 
United Nations. Students from schools across the country select 
a UN member nation they wish to represent, research It 
thoroughly, and act as that nation's ambassadors to this 
simulated UN session. The purpose of the CNMUNC is to offer 
students an overview on global crises, war and militarism, threats 
to international security, and other matters which dally confront 
the actual UN in New York City. It's an opportunity for them to 
discover and use their individual talents in speaking, negotiating, 
and problem-solving. The conference is a four-day event which 
concludes on Sunday, Feb. 1 . 

Sponsors are still needed to help defray expenses for the 
trip. Several Local businesses have already contributed as have 
some members of the college staff. Individuals or businesses in- 
terested in helping some or all the students (sponsorships are 
$55/person) may contact the Intregrated Studies Division in the 
Academic Center on the Main Campus. 



Supervisors may act tonight on tuition plan 



If all of the Loyalsock Township supervisors are present tonight at the 
board of supervisors' regularly-scheduled meeting, action is likely on a pro- 
posal to provide partial W.A.C.C. tuition reimbursement for township 
residents. 

The meeting is to be held at 8:30 p.m. in the township building on East 
Third Street, according to Mrs. Ruth J. Wheeland, township office manager. 

Last week, an open hearing about the proposal was held by the super- 
visors. 

Dr. Robert C. Bowers, executive assistant for internal affairs at the Col- 
lege, was there to provide background about the College's retraining and 

Engineers scholarship offered 

Information about $1 ,000 Society for fvlanufacturing Engineers Founda- 
tion Scholarships is available in the College's Financial Aid Office In the 
Academic Center. 

The scholarships will be awarded for the Fall Semester, according to an 
announcement from Donald S. Shade, director of financial aid. 

The number of scholarships which will be awarded depends on the en- 
dowment money, he noted. 

Students must be full-time in an engineering or technology curriculum, 
seeking a career in robotics/automated systems. Students must have a grade 
point average of 2.75 to be eligible. 

The deadline for applications is March 1 . 

Information is also available in the division director's office in the Metal 
Trades Building 



SORRY WE'RE LATE... 
WE WERE A LITTLE UNDER THE WEATHER 

The SPOTLIGHT - usually circulated on Mondays during the academic 
year - is being distributed today. Tuesday, since the year's worst snowstorm 
caused production and delivery disruptions. 



SPOTLIQHT 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday momino of the academic year ex- 
cept lor College vacations, by mass communications and other Interested students 
of The Wlliiamspcrl Area Community College 

Oltice Room 7. Academic Center. 1005 W Third SI Wllliamsport Pa 
17701 Telephone (717)326-3761. Extension 7533 



Opinions expressed are those of the student newspaper or ol those whose 
names accompany Items Opinions do not reflect otilcial opinion ol the institution. 



LETTERS TO SPOTLIQHT READERS 

Letters to SPOTLIGHT readers should be typed, double-spaced and may be 
handcamed or sent to the SPOTLIGHT otflce In the Academic Center Letters will 
be reviewed by the newspaper staH and may be rejected with a statement as to 
reason All letlets must be signed; signatures must be authenticated by a member 
ol the newspaper statt No letter will be published without the writer's name 



upgrading programs, providing Information about "our vision of the future and 
what we've developed in new programs to meet these needs." 

Dr. Bowers, who coincidentally is a member of the Loyalsock Township 
School Board, also noted, "There were opinions on both sides of the issue, but 
i feel the supervisors believe the College is a major and significant develop- 
ment of not only Loyalsock Township but also Lycoming County." 

The proposed plan, presented in the form of an ordinance, would provide 
reimbursement of up to $2,000 if individuals meet requirements. [A copy of the 
proposal is availatile in The SPOTLIGHT office, Room 7, Academic Center] 



SPORTS CARD 



INDOOR TENNIS 

Indoor tennis at the West Branch 
Racquet Club, Monday through Friday, 
9:30 to 1 1 p.m. at cost of $3 per per- 
son. Validated ID must be shown to 
receive this reduced rate. 
KARATE 

There are Shotakan karate classes 
on Monday and Thursday nights, 7 to 9 
p.m. during Spring Semester. This 
class is open to all faculty, staff, and 
students. Free with valid ID. Class runs 
the entire semester unless school 
breaks. 
INDOOR SOCCER 

Indoor soccer begins this tomor- 
row, Wednesday. Any interested facul- 
ty, staff, and students may sign up in 
the Recreation Center in the Lifelong 
Education Center. The league will be 
every Wednesday night, 7 to 10 p.m. 
for eight weeks. 
SWIMMING 

Swimming hours at the YMCA are 
as follows: Monday, Wednesday, 8:30 



to 9:30 p.m.; Friday. 7:30 to 8:45 p.m.; 
Saturday, 1 to 5:45 p.m.; Sunday, 1 2 to 
4:45 p.m.; Ivlonday through Friday, 3 to 
4 p.m. These are ail open swims. Ad- 
mission is $2 with validated College ID. 
SKI TRIP 

Ski Sawmill trip is scheduled for 
this Wednesday. Bus leaves the Learn- 
ing Resources Center at 5:30 p.m. and 
returns at 1 1 p.m. Sign-up is in Recrea- 
tion Center prior to the trip. Lift, rental, 
and lessons are $1 7; lift and rental are 
$14; and lift only is $7. A valid I.D. 
must be shown to go on the lifts. 
ICE SKATING 

Ice skating at the Wllliamsport Ar- 
mory Monday through Thursday, 5 to 9 
p.m. Free with valid ID. 
VOLLEYBALL 

Four more male or female 
volleyball players are needed to form a 
pick up team. Any one interested may 
contact Ivlargot Bayer in Room 209 of 
the Gym from 1 :30 to 1 p.m. Monday 
to Thursday "as soon as possible." 



Elevators for handicapped, director says 



The elevators in the Academic 
Center and the Learning Resources 
Center are for handicapped persons 
who cannot use the stairs, according to 
Lawrence W. Emery Jr., director of ad- 
visement and career services. 



Emery said, "Persons who do not 
have handicaps should not use the 
elevators as the extra wear and tear 
means more down time for service." 

He added, "Your cooperation 
would be appreciated." 



SPOTLIGHTDTiadiy, Ju. 27, I»nn3 



Students invited to join PBL; Leadership Conference to be held 



Phi Beta Lambda would like to Invite all students involved in business 
courses to join their organization, according to Paul W. Goldfeder, faculty ad- 
viser. 

An open meeting will be held at 3:30 p.m., today in the Academic Center. 

Martin T. Green, president, will preside over the meeting and introduce the 



officers. Green will also give information about the 1 6th State Leadership Con- 
ference which is scheduled for the last week of March in Slate College, Goldfeder 
said. 

PBL is continuing its used book sale in Room 3 in the basement of the 
Academic Center, until this Friday, Goldfeder added. 



SGA elects new vice president; more elections to be held 



Lynnee K. Wesson was unanimously e'ected Student Government 
Association vice president, according to Kathy L. Cobb, SGA advisor. 

Miss Wasson, a business management student from Pine Grove Mills, will 
serve as vice president for the remainder of the 1986-1987 academic year. 

Erica J. Silberbauer, of Milan, is a new senator of the Natural Resource 
Campus, 



SGA needs six new senators as well as committee members, according 
to Ms, Cobb.Those interested may contact an SGA representative at the 
Recreation Center Office or Room A1 38, Lifelong Education Center (LEC). 

The next senate meeting will be next Thursday, Feb. 5 at 3-30 p m in 
Room 81 07, LEC. 



Job Ops 



Summer Employment 

The Advisement Center has 
received notices and applications for 
summer employment with the Federal 
Government for Pennsylvania and na- 
tionally. 

Armstrong Tree Experts, Inc., Ex- 
ton, Pa. has immediate as well as full 
and part-time summer openings for 
nursery management students and 
graduates. More details in Advisement 
Center. 

Somerset County Park Commis- 
sion in New Jersey has various open- 
ings for summer employment for hor- 
ticultural maintenance. More details in 
Advisement Center. 

Part-Time Employment 

Petroleum Equipment Trade, Inc., 
First and Maynard Streets has an open- 
ing for a student 8-1 hours a week for 
cleaning up and sweeping floors. 
Minimum wage. Stop by the business 
to apply. 

Needed: a wooden reel 
assembler. 20 hours a week. Schedule 
flexible. To apply, send name, phone 
number, and academic major to P.O. 
Box 4008, Williamsport, PA 17701. 




Welcome College Students 

Court & Willow Cafe 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 I 

I 
Lunch • I 

Dinner • . 

Sunday Brunch (10:00-2:00) | 

Imported Beer 

Deli Sandwiches & Salads | 

Gourmet Soups • ! 

Homemade Desserts • I 

20% Discount with I.D. 
Good thru March 30, 1987 i 




The Puppet Factory: Cuttin' up for kids. See Page 1. 



News highlights in brief 



WWAS DEBUTS 

The College's student-operated 
radio station, WWAS, began broad- 
casting for this semester yesterday. 
SERIES OPENS 

"Teaching Adults in the Communi- 
ty College", a series offered by the Col- 
lege's Office of Staff and Program 
Development, begins this Thursday. In- 
formation available from Cindy 
Schloss, Ext. 7240. 



SABBATICAL DEADLINE 

Deadline for faculty to file requests 
for sabbatical leaves is next Monday, 
Feb. 2, 
PETITION TO GRADUATE DEADLINE 

Friday, Feb. 6 is the deadline for 
students to file "petition to graduate" if 
they plan to be graduated this Spring. 
Petitions are to be filed at Student 
Records Office in Academic Center, 



DIRECTORIES BEING READIED 

The College's new staff telephone 
directory is being readied for distribu- 
tion. 
CHIP BEGINS 

"Official" start of CHIP weight 
control program is tomorrow, Wednes- 
day. 




p H M I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ m 

iFREE PIZIAll 



I Buy any size Uttle Caesars 

IOrigitieil round pizza at regular 
price, get the identiceil pizza 
■ FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 



W.A.C.C. ihidcau u?e 
■ddmoDil 10% only witb 
itodent I.D. ud Uiii id. 



One coupon per customer. Carry out only. At participating locations. 



I 
I 
I 
i 
I 
i 



iDSPOTUGHTDTuextaj, Jm. 21, 1M7 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Tuesday. Jan^ 27 through Sunday, Feb. 1 



MEETINGS 

SGA executive meeting... 3 p.m., this Thursday, Jan. 29, 
Room A1 38, LEC; open to officers only. 

SGA Senate... 3:30 p.m., this Thursday, Jan. 29, Room B107, 
LEC; open to all students, faculty, and staff. 

Phi Beta Lambda... 3:30 p.m., today, Tuesday, Jan. 27, Room 
329, ACC; open to all members and students. 

Narcotics Anonymous... every Wednesday, 7 p.m., Room 
B107, LEC. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... business meeting every Tuesday (to- 
day) from noon to 1 p.m.. Room B107, LEC. 

SPOTLIGHT... 8:30 a.m., tomorrow, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 
Room 7, basement. Academic Center. 
ACTIVITIES 

Ski Trip... to Ski Sawmill, tomorrow, Wednesday, Jan. 28; bus 
leaves from in front of the Learning Resources Center at 5:30 p.m. 
Ski trip sign-up sheets available in Recreation Center office. Room 
A137, LEC. 



SALES, FUND-RAISERS 

Flower Sale... Horticulture Club, 9 a.m., Friday.Feb. 13, ACC 
Lobby and LEC Foyer. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

City Bus... Students with validated ID may ride at reduced 
rates. Info from College Activities Office, Gym. 

Swimming... W.A.C.C. students who are not members of the 
YMCA may use pool during certain hours; contact College Ac- 
tivities Office for up-to-minute listing on hours; $2 per person 
charge with W.A.C.C. ID. 

Movie Tickets... UA movie tickets now available in College 
Bookstore, $2.75 each. (Cost increased by 25 cents by UA.) Spon- 
sored by SGA. 

Student Health Insurance... forms available at Student Health 
Service, Room 104, Gym; cut-off date is Feb. 15. 

Student Health Services... Room 104, Gym. Registered 
nurse on duty to treat minor illness and refer to physician or facii- 
ty most capable of providing additional treatment Hours are 8 
a.m. to 3:30 p.m., ft/londay through Friday. 



The Puppet Factory to give presentation as partof Children's Series 



As part of the Children's Series, The Puppet Factory will present "The 
Firebird" on March 28, according to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, College activities 
coordinator. 

The Puppet Factory tours Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and 
Virginia from a home base in Yorl< County, bringing children "the in-novatlve 
and entertaining experience of the puppet theater", according to Ms. Fremiotti. 

Producers of The Puppet Factory are Carolyn Koerber, Lyn Kidder, and 
Margo Lovelace, the coordinator noted. 

"The Firebird" Is a 30-minute performance with a question-and-answer 
session afterward. It is aimed at ages pre-school to sixth grade, but can be en- 
joyable for all ages. 

It is a puppet play about the firebird, the legendary symbol of happiness, 
that has been banished from the land by a wicked tsar. Everyone is under the 
tsar's spell except a servant girl. She must find a way to defeat the tsar and br- 
ing back the firebird. 

"The Firebird" will be presented by The Puppet Factory in two different 
showings on Saturday, March 28, with one show at 2 p.m. In the Young 
Women's Christian Association and a second show at 7 p.m. on the North 
Campus, Ms, Fremiotti said. 

The Children's Series Is sponsored by the College's North Campus and 
the N^ullicultural Society, the Williamsport YWCA, and the Greater 
Williamsport Community Arts Council, The series Is supported by a grant from 
the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the Williamsport Foundation. 

All vehicles must be moved 
for snow clearing: security chief 

Chief ol Security Cecil Cryder yesterday Issued a reminder that 
all vehicles must be removed from College parking lots In Instances 
of snow emergencies so that the snow can be cleared away. 

Vehicles must be removed by 10 p.m. on weekdays and by 5 
p.m. on Fridays and weekends to permit snow clearing. 

Violators, he said, will be towed away and subject to Imposition 
ol lowing costs as well as a $10 line. 



Cillo's 
College Corner 

PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Third SI. 

(Next lo Ihe Academic Center) 

HOURS* 

Mod. thru Than. 

7:30 i.m. lo 6 D.m. 

Frida;, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 



LUNCH SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 



REGULARLY $3.35 
REQULARLY S1.9S 



COLD HAM AND CHEESE SUB 
WHOLE $3.00 
HALF $1.60 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 
Four Winners Each Weeld 



BREAKFAST SPECIA^^ 
THIS WEEK J^«' 

SAUSAGE AND EGG ON MUFFIN 

$1.20 REQULARLY St. so 



Tickets for the series are $5 tor all three performances or $2 for individual 
performances. For ticket information, students may call the College at 
327-4763, Ext. 7269. Tickets may also be purchased by sending a check with 
name, address, and telephone number to College Activites Office, 
Williamsport Area Community College, 1005 W. Third St., V(/illiamsport, PA 
17701-5799. 

Also being performed as part of the Children's Series are. The 
Philadelphia Theater Caravan with "We've Stories to Tell of Africa" on Satur- 
day, Feb. 28 and Duet Productions with "Peter Pan" on Saturday, April 4, ac- 
cording to tyls. Fremiotti 



ABC BOWLING LANES 

1245 Park Avenue (at Rose St.) 
College League Sign-Ups 

Men, Women, or Mixed 
Three Persons per Team 

Sign Up - 4 P.M., Jan. 27 
Price $3.25 Free Shoes I 

i 



IF YOU WANT TO 
BOWL AND THIS 
TIME DOESN'T FIT 
YOUR SCHEDULE, 
PLEASE PHONE FOR 
OTHER TIMES 

AVAILABLE. 



i Phone 326-2885 for more information 

I Free Trophies and Banquet 

i Provided by ABC Bowling Lanes 




WACn ARCHIVES 



Tour of the College's 
student-operated radio station, 
WWAS, by students of the 
West Branch School Associa- 
tion was given by Scott 
Stenger, at right, broadcasting 
student and assistant station 
manager. 

In the background Is 
teacher Susan MIddleton, wife 
of Dr. James E. MIddleton, dean 
of academic affairs the College. 
The students are not on a 
regular study schedule; they 
are on a self-paced program. 

[SPOTLIGHT Photo 
by Mary Button] 




SPOTLIGHT 

Monday, Feb. 2, 1987 • Vol. 22, No. 19 • 8 Psges 
Wllllamsport Area Community College • Wllllamsporl, Pa. 17701 



Health Week begins; five events planned 



-4- 



Health Week begins today and 
continues Thursday, Feb. 5, according 
to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator 
of College activities. Health Week is 
sponsored by Student Health Services 
and College Activities. 

The first event during Health Week 
is a seminar on crack and other addic- 
tives. The seminar will be held in the 



College Auditorium and will be 
presented by the staff of Ivlarworth, a 
private treatment facility affiliated with 
Geisinger Medical Center. 

Tomorrow, practical nursing 
students will do vision checks, blood 
pressure screening, and blood glucose 
testing from 1 to 4 p.m. in the corridor 
of the Learning Resources Center. 



On Wednesday, Feb. 4, from 9:30 
a.m. to noon. Dr. Jack Walmer, a 
psychologist at Williamsport Hospital 
will present a stress management 
seminar in the Auditorium. 

On the last day of Health Week, 
Thursday, Feb. 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m., Nancy West, director of 
the Women's Forum, will discuss the 



Williamsport Hospital Women's 
Center. 

There will also be an AIDS film 
and open discussion on Thursday. 
Feb. 5, From 1 to 2 p.m. in the 
Auditorium, presented by Sue 
Nearhood, RN, from the Pennsylvania 
State Health Department. 



May graduates should check transcripts: assistant registrar 

Deadline is this Friday 



students who believe they will have satisfied requirements for graduation 
at the end of the semester should check the transcripts against the College 
catalog, according to Information from the College Records Office. 

In most cases, students will be graduated under the requirements in effect 
at the time they enrolled in their program. 

According to Ms. Connie R. Kelsey, assistant registrar, graduating 
students who have questions about electives, etc., should check with their ad- 
viser. If questions remain, the adviser should contact the registrar, she said. 



Ms. Kelsey also said students must "petition to graduate" through the Stu- 
dent Records Office. The cost of the diploma is $5 and must be submitted by 
this Friday, Feb. 6. 

Late petitions will cost $1 and the diploma may not be delivered by conrv 
mencement. 

Students need not to order a diploma in order to graduate, but must peti- 
tion in order to be evaluated and have their transcript reflect "graduate", she 
said. 



Loyalsock approves tuition reimbursement plan 



The Loyalsock Twp. Board of Supervisors in a meeting last Tuesday 
voted four to one in favor of an ordinance authorizing the municipality to pro- 
vide partial tuition reimbursements to qualifying residents attending the Col- 
lege this fall. 

Dr. Robert G: Bowers, executive assistant for internal affairs who coin- 
cidentally Is a member of the Loyalsock School Board, said, "The supervisors 
have Independently developed, endorsed, and implemented the action, and I 
am delighted the action took place. It provides expanded opportunties and ac- 
cess to the College." 

Voting In favor of the tuition plan were Richard C. Haas, chairman, as well 
as Supervisors Donald L. Garver, William C. Reighard and Lynn C. Womer Jr. 



Bruce E. Henry, secretary of the supervisors, cast the lone "no" vote, say- 
ing that it is not the responsibility of the township to provide education for its 
residents beyond the secondary school level. No one from the public was pre- 
sent at last Tuesday's session. 

Set aside last year by the township was $1 0,000 and this year, $1 2,500 
was set aside -making a total of $22,500 for 1 987 - for tuition reimbursments 
which will begin in July and first be available for the Fall Semester at the Col- 
lege. 

Dr. Bowers said that although this is not a sponsorship issue - which he 
indicated is always between two parties - it is "an example of community sup- 
port which is critical to any community college." 



2DSP0TLIQHTDMonday, Fab. 2, 1987 

Year of the Constitution 




The Second Amendment 

The Second Amendment to the Constitution guarantees the right to 
bear arms. Again, with each right, there is responsibility. 

Fscsd with oppression, the forefathers provided the citizens of 
the new country legal means for self-protection. Considered In that 
light, It Is an affront to the Second Amendment to declare that 
government should In no way restrict the use of firearms - just as It 
would be an affront to say that government should totally restrict the 
use of firearms. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Mondiy. F»b. 2, 1W7 - Vol. 22, No. 19 

The SPOTLIGHT is publlsried each Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept lor College vacations, by mass communications and other Interested students 
o( The Wtillamsporl Area Community College 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W Third St , Wllliamsport Pa 
17701 Telephone (71 7| 326-3761, Extension 7533 

Opinions expressed are those of the student newspaper or of those whose 
names eccompany Items Opinions do not reflect official opinion of the institution. 

The SPOTLIGHT is a member of 
the Columbia Scholastic Press Association 

LETTERS TO SPOTLIGHT READERS 
and NEWS REPORT CONTRIBUTIONS 

Letters to SPOTLIGHT readers and other contributions should be typed 
double-spaced and may be hand-carried or seni lo the SPOTLIGHT office in the 
Academic Cenler Leiters and ail other material submitted lor publication will be 
reviewed by the newspaper staff and may be re|ecled with a statemeni as lo 
reason Ail letters must be signed: signatures must be authenlicated by a member 
of the newspaper staff No letter will be published without the writer's name 

STAFF 

Brenda M, VIbert • Managing Editor 

Donna M. Trimble • Photography Editor 

Michael Waldron • Bualness/Advartlslng Manager 

Catharine A. Hannon • Senior Staff Writer 

Ruth Ann Hlxson • Senior Staff Writer 

James Treese • Contributing Compositor 

Margaret Flanagan • Staff Writer 

Jamet Doan • Staff Artlat 

Olane Shaheen • Advertising Production 

Jeff Campanalll ■ BualnesafAdvertlaIng StaH 

Tim Neldtg • Graphic An> Technlclen 

Anthony N. Clllo • Contributing Faculty Adviser 




Show a little 

courtesy, 

please 

The SPOTLIGHT'S View 

A seemingly small but significant 
problem is developing here at the Col- 
lege and It Is time the students are 
made aware of it. 

First, the elevator Is provided as a 
convenience for the handicapped and 
it Is being abused by students who 
really don't need to ride. 

Secondly, people sit on the floor in 
the hallways with their leet stretched 
out across the hall making It almost Im- 
possible to walk down the hall 
-especially when classes leave oyt. It 
becomes extremely difficult for the 
handicapped. 

Please show a little courtesy to 
those around you; respect the rights of 
others. Leave the elevator for those 
who need It. if you sit in the hail, please 
pull up so others can get by. 



Your cigarettes are 
hazardous to my health 



May be 'old' 

to you... 

but 'new' 

to them 

The SPOTLIGHT'S View 

The SPOTLIGHT continues 
to collect books and useable 
paper for the Literacy Council. 

We welcome ijonations so 
that we can help those who are 
making the effort to learn to 
read. 

Members of the College 
community who wish to bring 
books to campus to donate may 
call us at Extension 7533 bet- 
ween 1 and 4 p.m. We'll come 
to get the books. 

Or, if you prefer: Bring the 
books to Room 7, Basement, 
Academic Center. 

Just think: If you weren't 
able to read, you'd not know 
how much we appreciate your 
help! Thanks. .- 



By Ruth Ann Hixson of the SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Passive smoking has been much In the media lately. Ivledicai evidence con- 
nects passive smoking (Inhaling the smoke of someone else's cigarette) to em- 
physema, chronic bronchitis, and lung cancer In non-smokers. 

It stands to reason that if cigarettes are hazardous to the health of those who 
smoke them, they are also hazardous to the persons who don't smoke but Inhale 
the smoke of others. 

Unfortunately, this is a situation not easily avoided by non-smokers. I^any 
persons who smoke seem to think that if there aren't NO SlylOKING signs that 
they automatically have the right to light up. There are no signs In elevators, but 
there are laws banning smoking In elevators. Still, some smokers get on the 
elevators with lighted cigarettes. 

And what about non-smokers who have severe respiratory ailments such as 
emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, and allergies? What of their rights to 
breathe clean air? Inhaling smoke can cause these persons symptoms ranging 
from mild discomfort and shortness of breath to hay fever-like reactions to severe 
and prolonged bouts of coughing. 

Why should non-smokers have to suffer because many persons who smoke 
are too Inconsiderate to ask, "Do you mind if I smoke?" Yes, I do mind! 

When are the legislatures in this country going to give non-smokers the legal 
right to say, "Put out your cigarette. You're killing me"? 



February is Heart Month 




What Have You Done 

for 

Your Heart - or Sweetheart -Lately....? 



Job Ops 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, Feb. 2, 1987a3 



The iollowing employment oppor- 
tunity inlormation is provided by the 
College's Advisement and Career Ser- 
vices Center as a service to students 
Questions about listings here should be 
directed to that otiice which is in the 
Learning Resources Center. 

SUMMER JOBS — Various summer 
jobs including unit counselors, lake and 
pool staff, administration and food ser- 
vice are available at the Girl Scouts' 
Camp Louise, eight miles from Ber- 
wick- Arrangements can be made for 
students who wish to use their ex- 
perience for internship credit. 
HEALTH-RELATED - The Lehigh 
Valley Hospital Center in Alientown of- 
fers summer, on-the-job experience for 
students in health-related fields A 
housing allowance is provided and par- 
ticipants are paid $2f6 for a 40-hour 
week. 

LITTLE LEAGUE — Little League Inc., - 
Route 1 5-South, has an opening for a 
person to sell tickets and work in the 
gift shop Saturdays for 6'/2 hours and 
on Sundays for four hours. Minimum 
wage. Interested persons should stop 
at Little League Headquarters and ask 
for either Dave Fogel of Mark Pompeo. 
GRAPHIC ARTS — Penn Valley Prin- 
ting, 201 W. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 
1 7870 would like resumes from fourth 
semester students graphic arts 
students. Resumes should be sent to 
the attention of John Lettirer. 
NURSERY MANAGEMENT — Rickert 
Nurseries, Yardley, Pa. will interview 
nursery management students on cam- 
pus on Feb. 24 if there is enough m 
terest. Those interested should bring a 
resume to the Advisement Center in 
the Learning Resources Center by next 
Friday, Feb. 13, if an interview Is 
desired. 

Search for 1988 
Miss Pennsylvania 
now underway 

Applications are now being ac- 
cepted from all over the Keystone State 
for the annual Miss Pennsylvania USA 
Pageant to be staged this year for the 
third time in Monroeville, in the Grand 
Ballroom of the High Rise Howard 
Johnson's Hotel on April 3, 4, and 5, 
1987. 

The Miss Pennsylvania USA 
Pageant is an official Miss USA - Miss 
Universe Contest. 

There is "No Performing Talent" 
requirement, all judging is on the basis 
of poise, personality and beauty of face 
and figure. Entrants who qualify must 
be at least 17 years of age by Feb. 1, 
1988, never married, and at least a six- 
month resident of Pennsylvania; thus, 
college dorm students are eligible. 

All girls interested in competing for 
the title must write to: Miss Penn- 
sylvania USA Pageant, Tri-State 
Headquarters-Dept. S, 347 Locust 
Avenue, Washington, PA 15301-3399 
by Feb. 28th. Letters must include a re- 
cent snapshot, a brief biography and 
phone number. 




CURRICULUM COMMITTEE is involved in review of curriculum 
proposals, formats and schedules. 

ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND ISSUES COMMITTEE is involved in 
program evaluation and faculty evaluation. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE reported on the acceptance of the 
committee recommendations for study space in the Academic 
Center, as well as installation of vending machines. 

HUMAN RESOURCES COMMITTEE has presented a recommendation 
regarding leave/vacation time for Christmas break primarily 
affecting classified and service staff. They have formed a 
subcommittee to investigate a staff scho larsh ip/ tui t ion 
reimbursement fund. 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE continues its 
annual update of the Long Range Plan. 



--•rk on the 



COLLEGE COUNCIL, at its regular meeting, accepted the 
proposal of the Human Resource Committee regarding the 
recc«mmendat ion cif leave/vacation tim^ for classified and 
service staff and discussed class scheduling as it might be 
affected by the opening of the new Advanced Technology and 
Health Sciences Center. Listed below are the dates and 
times C'f meetings scheduled for February. 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1987 



- Long Range Planning Committee 

- Academic Standards and Issues Comrr 

- Human Resources Committee 

- Student Affairs Committee 




CONSIDERING A HEALTH CAREER? 
PRACTICAL NURSING MAY BE FOR YOU! 

3-semester certificate program 

59 transferable credits 

81 6 hours of hands-on experience in 3 clinical settings 

1536 total course/iab hours 

MAXIMUM 15:1 student/teacher ratio 

Jobs throughout the state 

STOP IN ACC 420 FOR MORE DETAILS ON NURSING 




4DSP0TLIQHTDMonday, Fob 2, 1987 



^46^,i.<6^J^Aii^.y >" 



Distinquished 
Teaching Awards 
nomination 
forms available 
at various spots 



students, faculty, 
staff may nominate 



Forms for nominating faculty members for ttie Distinguished Teaching 
Awards are now available at the Tutoring Center and at the Information Desk 
in the Learning Resources Center as well as In the Financial Aid Office In the 
Academic Center, according to Dr. Robert G. Bowers, executive assistant for 
internal affairs. 

Each year, one faculty member Is chosen to receive the "Master Teacher 
Award" and hvo or three other faculty members receive "Excellence in 
Teaching Awards". 

Recipients of the awards are chosen from nominees who are outstanding 
in their presentation of inslructional materials and performance of services to 
students 

The primary reason for these awards is to recognize outstanding perfor- 
mance. Dr. Bowers said. 

In addition, the awards reaffirm the College's commitment and dedication 
to excellence, according to Dr. Bowers. 

Anyone in the College community may submit a nomination for a faculty 
member who has completed one year of teaching on a full-time level. Part-time 
faculty and first-year instructors are not eligible for these awards. 

Dr. Bowers said he is interested in creating an awareness among the stu- 
dent body and a desire to motivate students to submit nominations. 

Pick-up points (locations) for Distinguished Teacher Awards booklets and 
nomination forms are the switchboard, Financial Aid, Tutoring Center, In- 
dustrial Technologies Division office, Student Government Association office, 
North Campus, and Dr. Bowers' office (in Room 200 of the Lifelong Education 
Center). 

The completed nomination forms must be returned to the Office of the Ex- 
ecutive Assistant for Internal Affairs, Room 200, Lifelong Education Center, no 
later than March 1 0, 1 987. 



The Women's Series will feature 
author and poet Marge Piercy for 
special presentations on Wednesdays, 
Feb. 11 and Feb. 18. 

A book review dealing with Pler- 
cy's work will be held in LeJeune Chef, 
next Wednesday, Feb. 11, at 5 p.m. 
There will be no charge tor this event, 
but reservations are required in ad- 
vance. 

Dinner will be held following the 

book review, at 5:45 p.m. in LeJeune 

Chef. The cost is $6 and reservations 

are required in advance. 

^ A workshop pertaining to Piercy's 

yyoiTiGn s s©ri©s^'^''™'"'^^^®'''^®''"^^''^^' '^^^^ ^®' 

at 2 p.m. in the Professional Develop- 
ment Center. There is no charge for the 
workshop, but reservations should be 
made a week in advance. 

At 7 p.m. the same day, there will 
be a reading and commentary on Pier- 
cy's work In the Academic Center 
Auditorium. Admission is free for 



Marge Piercy 

to visit College 

as part of 



students of the College, faculty, and 
staff with a valid college ID. For those 
without IDs, the cost is $2. This fee 
covers the cost of the author party. 

The author party will be held im- 
mediately after the reading and com- 
mentary in the Bookstore, Learning 
Resouces Center. The author's book 
will be available for purchase. 

Piercy is a political activist, 
teacher, visiting lecturer, consultant, 
and poet-in-residence. 

She is the author of the poetry col- 
lections Breaking Camp, To Be of Use, 
The Moon is Always Female, and 
Circles on the Water. 

He! short stories and novels in- 
clude Going Down Fast, Small 
Changes, The High Cost of Living, 
Vida, Braided Lives, and Fly Away 
Home. 

The Women's Series is being 
sponsored by the College, the 
Women's Forum, The Multicultural 



Society, The Bookstore, the 
Williamsport YWCA, and B&S Picture 
Frames. This series is also being sup- 
ported by a grant from the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania Council on 
the Arts and the Williamsport Founda- 
tion. 

Admission is free to students, 
faculty, and staff with a valid College 
ID. Tickets are $5 for all Reading/Lec- 
tures of the Women's Series and $2 for 
individual Reading/Lectures. There is 
no admission for workshops and book 
reviews, but pre-registration is required 
by calling 327-4763, Ext. 7269. Dinner 
is the expense of each indivdual ($6). 
Reservations are required. The off- 
campus ticket outlets are: B&S Picture 
Frames, Lexicon Bookstore, Y.W.C.A., 
and the North Campus. 

Information is available by 
telephoning 327-4763, Ext. 7269 or the 
YWCA at 322-4637. 



Children's Series to offer 

'We've Stories 

to Tell of Africa' 



"We've Stories to Tell of Africa..." will be the first presentation of the 
Children's Series. Two performance are scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 28: one 
at 2 p.m. at the local YWCA; the other at 7 p.m. at the North Campus. 

Series tickets are $5 per person for all three performances. Individual 
tickets are available for $2. 

Two other performances are scheduled. They are "The Fire-bird", March 
28; and "Peter Pan", April 4. 

This series is supported by a grant from the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania Council on the Arts and the Williamsport Foundation. The Children's 
Series is also supported by the North Campus of the College, the Multi-Cultural 
Society, the Williamsport YWCA, and the Greater Williamsport Community 
Arts Council. 

Information is available by calling 327-4763, Ext. 7269, or by sending a 
check along with name, address and telephone number in care of College Ac- 
tivities at the Williamsport Area Community College, 1 005 W. Third Street, 
Williamsport, PA 17701-5799. 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, Feb. 2, 1987d5 



Study Aids Week Feb. 9 through 1 3 



study Aids Week has been set for 
the week of next Monday, Feb 9 
through Friday, Feb. 13, according to 
Lawrence W. Emery, director of ad- 
visement and career service. 

Emery expiained that some 
students received early warning cards 
from their instructors. The notice telis 
students in which areas of study they 
need help. 

Some students receive early war- 

College using 

Act 11 7 funds 

for software 

College Inlormation Office 

The College is using State Depart- 
ment of Education grant funds to pur- 
chase instructional software that will in- 
fuse the use of computers across the 
College's curriculum. 

Dr. James E. ly^iddleton, dean of 
academic affairs, said the College has 
been awarded $1 76,61 in Act 1 1 7 dif- 
ferential technology grants to colleges 
and universities across the state. The 
monies, the dean explained, are to be 
used to upgrade technology used in 
the classroom. 

Funds have been allocated based 
on the institutions' full-time equivalent 
undergraduate enrollments. 

At the College, the funds will be 
used to provide such instructional 
capabilities as desktop publishing pro- 
grams like journalism, advertising art, 
and graphic arts, engineering analysis 
in civil engineering technology and 
automated manufacturing, computer 
analysis and management in forest 
harvesting and production, computer- 
aided design, and composition support 
to assist students in developing and 
revising composition writing 
assignments. 

Dr. Middleton said the College has 
received the first installment of grant 
fund payments from the state and has 
begun purchasing the instructional 
materials. He anticipates a significant 
portion of the funds will be spent 
through computer software vendors in 
the Williamsport area. 

Act 1 1 7 was signed into law by 
former Gov. Dick Thornburgh on July 
10. Among the supporters of the bill 
were area Representatives Anthony J. 
Cimini and Alvin C. Bush as well as 
State Senator Roger A, Madigan. 



ning cards advising them to see a 
counselor. During Study Aids Week, 
counselors will be available each hour 
to meet with students. If all the 
counselors are busy, students can 
make appointments to see the 
counselor later. 



According to Emery, "Study Aids 
Week is designed to provide 
assistance to students to help them 
analyze any concern they may have 
with their course". 

He emphasized that there are 
many resources available at the Col- 




Financial aid 
applications here 

Pennsylvania State and 
Federal Grant Applications and 
the Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College Financial Aid 
Application for the 1987-1988 
academic year now are 
available at the Financial Aid 
Office. 



Thomas Harpster, broadcasting 
student and radio station WWAS 
staff member shows West Branch 
School student* a cassette deck 
player and recorder on which they 



INDOOR TENNIS 

Indoor tennis at the West 
Branch Racquet Club, Monday 
through Friday, 9:30 to 1 1 p.m. 
at cost of $3 per person. 
Validated ID must be shown to 
receive this reduced rate which 
Is for students only, 
KARATE 

There are Shotakan karate 
classes- on Monday and Thurs- 
day nights, 7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Gymduring Spring Semester. 
This class is open to all faculty, 
staff, and students. Free with 
valid ID. Class runs the entire 
semester unless school breaks. 
INDOOR SOCCER 

Indoor soccer league began 
last Wednesday. The league 
will be every Wednesday night, 
7 to 10 p.m. for eight weeks. 
SWIMMING 

Swimming hours at the YM- 
CA are as follows: Monday, 
Wednesday, 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.; 
Friday, 7:30 to 8:45 p.m.; Satur- 
day, 1 to 5:45 p.m.; Sunday, 12 
to 4:45 p.m.; Monday through 
Friday, 3 to 4 p.m. These are all 
open swims. Admission is $2 
with validated College ID. 
SKI TRIP 

Ski Sawmill trip is schedul- 
ed for this Wednesday. Bus 
leaves the Learning Resources 
Center at 5:30 p.m. and returns 
at 1 1 p.m. Sign-up is in Recrea- 



llstened to the earlier recording of a 
public service announcement which 
Is to be aired. pn WWAS. (Other 
photo. Page 1) [SPOTLIGHT Photo by 

Mary Button] 



lege to assist students, such as the 
Tutoring Center and Library. Students 
can also get suggestions from their in- 
structor on how the instructor can help 
them in their class. 

Emery said the major goal of 
study Aids Week is to improve the 
students' grades, so that they don't get 
low grades at mid-semester. 

Martin Green 

re-elected 
PBL president 

Phi Beta Lambda met Tuesday, 
Jan. 27, and elected officers for the 
Spring Semester, according to Paul W. 
Goldfeder, faculty adviser. 

Elected were lufartin T. Green,_ a 
business management student from 
Williamsport (who had been president 
in the Fail Semester) as president ; 
Marilyn J. Kiess, a word processing 
student from Jersey Shore as vice 
president: Lisa A. Folmar, a business 
management student from Mon- 
toursville as treasurer; and Debbie 
Stiber, as secretary. Administrative 
aides are Susan L. Bailey, a business 
administration student from 
Monroeton, Shelley A. Stover, a 
general studies student from Jersey 
Shore, and Bradley L. Kandare, a 
business management student from 
Cyclone. 



■SPORTS CARD- 

tion Center prior to the trip. Lift, 
rental, and lessons are $1 7; lift 
and rental are $1 4; and lift only 
is $7. A valid ID. must be shown 
to go on the lifts. 
ICE SKATING 

Ice skating at the 
Williamsport Armory Monday 



through Thursday, 5 to 9 p.m. 
Free with valid ID. 
VOLLEYBALL 

Round robin volleyball has 
begun. If you did not hand in a 
roster by the deadline you are 
not eligible to participate in the 
tournament. 



;«KXKK>HK>a«K>aK ^mKymumK-mxiamamm 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

^^l^^One Block from W.A.C.C. | 

DAILY SPECIALS i 

Hours: Mon.-Sil. II i.m. to 9 p.m. CioKd Sundiy ^ 




Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Regular Sub 

Meatball 

Turkey 

Ham 

Tuna 

Cheese Steak 



Whole 
Whole 
Whole 
Whole 
Whole 
Whole 



$1 70 
$1.85 
$1.50 
$1.90 
$1.80 
$2.50 



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•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce S 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs | 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" \ 

$4 20 WHOLE $2 10 HALF J 



6oSP0TLIQHTDMonday, Feb. 2, 1987 



IF YOU CAN 
READ THIS AD- 
HELP SOMEONE 
WHO CANNOT. 



The 
SPOTLIGHT is 
now collecting 
paper and easy 
reading books 
to help the 
Lycoming 
County Literacy 
Project. 




students to help complete 
income tax returns 

VITA - Volunteer Income Tax Assistance - will begin aiding individuals in 
preparing their tax returns today througti April 9, according to Phillip D, 
Landers, associate professor of business. 

The service is available to anyone at no charge. 

Tax forms for which assistance is available include 1040EZ, 1040A, un- 
complicated 1 040, PA 40, and local income tax forms. 

Hours are noon to 4 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. 1 a.m. to noon and 
2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, in the Tutoring Center in the Learning 
Recources Center. 

This community service provides an opportunity for accounting students 
to gain practical experience in their field. Landers said 




SPOTLIOHTDMonday, Feb. 2, 1987d7 



A rousing badminton game In- and hospitality management of 

eludes Susan Hoops, an electronics Jersey Shore, and Mark Wegemer, 

student from Franklin on the left. In an electronics student fron St. Marys 

the middle Is Greg Baughman, food on right. [SPOTLIGHT Photo by Mary 

Button] 

Engineers scholarship offered 

Information about $1 ,000 Society for (vlanufacturing Engineers Founda- 
tion Scholarships is available in the College's Financial Aid Office in the 
Academic Center. 

The scholarships will be awarded for the Fall Semester, according to an 
announcement from Donald S. Shade, director of financial aid. 

The number of scholarships which will be awarded depends on the en- 
dowment money, he noted. 

Students must be full-time in an engineering or technology curriculum, 
seeking a career in robotics/automated systems. Students must have a grade 
point average of 2.75 to be eligible. 

The deadline for applications is IVIarch 1 . 

Information is also available in the division director's office in the Metal 
Trades Building. 



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1 Oisputed matter 
6 Columbus's seapor 

11 Certain doctor 

12 Calculator of old 
14 Government Servic 

(2 uds.) 

17 Cooking need 

18 "Call cab" 

19 Like some hats 

20 Highway part 

21 Motel sign 

23 Breeding places 

24 Make do 

25 Prefix: air 

26 Bravo, in Barceloi 

28 Dry. as wine 

29 Open 

31 Most eccentric 
33 Nomads 

35 Became less severt 
33 Giggle 

42 Mrs. Peron 

43 Japanese money 

45 Actress Char- 
lotte 

46 Certain European 



16 Decree 

21 Enroll again 

22 Precipitated 
25 home is I 



I Hawkins Day 27 I 



30 Stupefy 
v "">•; 31 Letters aft 

58 Purloined proof 

59 Hen's »ork 32 Letter trio 

60 Uses scissors 34 Inhabitants 

61 music 35 Terminates, 

36 Famous tenn 
DOWN „ family 

37 Cowboys' ge. 

1 Speaks in a singing 39 Gladiator's 
"oice 40 Mitigating 

2 Famous Canyon 41 Bowling but 



8 Bathe 

Q liner 

10 Oawn 

11 Quantity consumed 

13 Napped fabrics 

14 Capri and Wight 

15 Nanie for a pope 



47 Rouge 

49 Important person 

50 Former first 
lady 



This Week's Puzzle Brought to You By... 

Cathy's Diner 

1170 W. 4th SI. • Williamsport, Pa. 17701 • Phone 323-3224 



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SOCIETY OF MANUFACTURING ENGINEERS 

Chapter 49 — WILLIAMSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA y^^^S^ 

Monday, February 9, 1987 Dinner: 6:30 p.m. /iSK ilCl 

Quality Inn, Route 15 South, South Williamsport \>^VIv7/ 

Speaker: Mr. Charles Seifert Sr. on Laser Telemetrlc Gauges 

Reservations: Call Tom or Pam Livingstone, 326-1473 from 
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Reservations must be made by Friday morning, February 6, 




W.A.C.C.'s No. 1 
Radio Station 

For the Best in Rock 'n' Roll 
Rock that Rolls * Old and New! 



BaSPOTLIOHTDMonday. Fob. 2, 1987 

BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Feb. 2 through Sunday, Feb. 8 
MEETINGS 

SGA Senate... 3:30 p.m., this Thursday, Feb. 5, Room B107, 
LEG; open to all students, faculty, and staff. 

Alpha Omega... 7 to 9 p.m, tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 3, Room 
133, ACC. 

Narcotics Anonymous... every Wednesday, 7 p.m.. Room 
B107, LEG. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau ... business meeting every Tuesday from 
noon to 1 p.m.. Room B107, LEG. 

Bloodmobile... special meeting, 4 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24, 
Room B1 07, LEG. 

Board of Trustees.. 8 p.m. tonight, board room, second floor, 
LEG. 

SALES, FUND-RAISERS 

Flower Sale... Horticulture Glub, 9 a.m., Friday,Feb. 13, AGG 
Lobby and LEG Foyer. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

City Bus... Students with validated ID may ride at reduced 
rates. Info from Gollege Activities Office, Gym. 

Swimming... W.A.G.G. students who are not members of the 
YMCA may use pool during certain hours; contact Gollege Ac- 
tivities Office for up-to-minute listing on hours; $2 per person 
charge with W.A.G.G. ID. 

Movie Tickets... UA movie tickets now available in Gollege 
Bookstore, $2.75 each. (Gost increased by 25 cents by UA.) Spon- 
sored by SGA. 

Student Health Insurance... forms available at Student Health 
Services, Room 104, Gym; cut-off date is Feb. 15. 

Student Health Services... Room 104, Gym. Registered nurse 
on duty to treat minor illness and refer to physician or facility most 
capable of providing additional treatment. Hours are 8 a.m. to 3:30 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 



Steve Landesberg 
performance Feb. 21 



The Performing Artists Series, 
sponsored by the College, will present 
Steve Landesberg on Saturday, Feb. 
21. 

Landesberg will perform at 8 p.m. 
at the Scottish Rite Auditorium, 
downtown Williamsport. 

Tickets for Steve Landesberg are 
$15 tor reserved seats and $10 tor 
unreserved. Season tickets may be 



purchased for $40 (or patron and $35 
for general admission. 

Tickets may be purchased at B&S 
Picture Frames, 400 Market St. 
Williamsport; the Caboose Resturaunt, 
500 Pine St., Williamsport: the Lexicon, 
318 Market St., Lewisburg, and at the 
College Activities Office, Room 108, 
Gym, or by calling 326-4763. ext. 
7269 



All vehicles must be moved 
for snow clearing: security chief 

Chief of Security Cecil Cryder has again issued a 
reminder that vehicles must be removed from College 
parking lots in instances of snow emergencies so the 
snow can be cleared away. 

Vehicles must be removed by 10 p.m. on weekdays 
and by 5 p.m. on Fridays and weekends to permit snow 
clearing. 

Violators, he said, will be towed away and subject to 
paying towing costs as well as a $10 fine. 



Put the bite 
on hypothermia 



since we have been In the deep freeze for over a week, it is time for some 
tips tor avoiding cold-related injuries, says Mrs. Janet R. Ouerimit, College 
nurse. She has some suggestions for avoiding hypothermia and frostbite. 

—wear layers of clothing so you can "dress down" when indoors. 

—hand and foot protection should be warm but non-restrictive. (Tight 
wrist bands, socks, gloves and footwear should be avoided because they 
restrict circulation.) 

—warm head gear Is Important because so much body heat is lost 
through the head. 

—people with respiratory problems should wear a scarf or mask over the 
mouth and nose to warm the air before it is breathed. 

—drinking plenty of warm fluids helps to warm the entire body. 

—fatigue, hunger, circulatory illness, (ear, alcohol, young or old age, and 
wind chill (actors Increase the risk of cold injury. 

— (rostbite must be treated medically. I( you suspect you have frostbite, 
seek medical advice. 

Mrs. Ouerimit added that the elderly are particularly vulnerable to the 
cold. She suggested that l( students know of any elderly person In their 
neighborhood, they might offer to run errands tor him or her. 



Colloquium 
to be tomorrow 

The faculty and staff of the In- 
tegrated Studies Division are holding a 
faculty colloquium, tomorrow at 3:30 
p.m. in Room 132 of the Academic 
Center, according to Dr. Daniel J. 
Doyle, director o( the division. 

The topic (or the colloquium will 
be "The Futility of Star Wars: A Scien- 
tist's Viewpoint", The presenter (or the 
lecture and discussion will be Robert 
Keefer, assistant professor of physics 
at the College, 

Dr, Doyle noted, "This Is not just 
for faculty: all students are welcome to 
attend." 

TYPEWRITER FOR SALE 
Sturdy portable, good condition; 
spells good if given TLC. Call 
323-3988 & make offer, [advt.] 



Bus trips 
planned to D.C. 
and New York 

According to Ms. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities, there will be a bus trip to New 
York City, on Saturday, March 28. 

The bus will leave from In front of 
the Learning Resources Center 6 a.m. 
and from New York City at 9 p.m. 

There will also be a bus trip to 
Washington, D.C. on Saturday, April 
11. 

The bus leaves from in front of the 
Learning Resources Center at 6 a.m. 
and from DC, at 9 p.m. 

The coordinator said additional 
details would be reported later, but that 
she wanted to report the dates now to 
help interested persons plan. 



Cillo's 
College Corner 

PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Third St. 

(Next to the Acidemic Ceater) 

HOURS* 

Mod. Ihra Thin. 

7:30 i,n, to i p.m. 

Fridi;, 7:30 i.iii. to 4 p.m. 



LUNCH SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 



HALF TUNA SUB $1.60 
REGULARLY Sl.M ''" IkIiM 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 



BREAKFAST SPECIA®?^ 
THIS WEEK 

EGG ON IVIUFFIN 60' 
REGULARLY 80' t„ i«i.j«i 




ilKACC ARCHIVES 




SPOTLIGHT 

Monday, Feb. 9, 1987 • Vol. 22, No. 20 • 8 Pages 




/ 

■r \ 

/ i ^ 










2DSPOTLIGHTDMond«y, Feb. 9, 1987 

'A Chorus Line' 
changed concepts 

By Diana Shahean, of Tha SPOTLIGHT StaH 

The musical "A Chorus Line", conceived, originally directed, 
and choreographed by Michael Bennett, was a humorous, heart 
warming show. I've never seen or read the play before, so my 
percepiion was nothing like I observed. For some reason I envi- 
sioned the Rockettes dancing non-stop for two hours. In reality the 
set was an audition atmosphere. During the audition, we, the au- 
dience become familiar with the characters in the musical. 

It was really a fun adaptation of what might be typical or 
atypical of the trials and tribulations of the competitive world of pro- 
fessional dancing. 

Cassie. one of the numerous characters, was my favorite. She 
had started in the chorus line in her early adult years. With en- 
couragement moved on to advance her career. After many years in 
the fast lane, the illusion of getting the job of her dreams was shat- 
tered. Re-evaluating her Ideals, she decides, as a means of sur- 
vival, to regress back to the chorus line, where she can once again 
feel dignity and integrity. 

The Scottish Rite Auditorium, where the musical was perform- 
ed on Saturday, January 31 , seats 1 21 5. There were 1 11 3 in atten- 
dance that evening, which I find very refreshing. We as a College 
community should be very proud of our activities co-ordinalors for 
bringing us big city culture at affordable prices. 



« Coll«o* hss an Ofwn Admlatlon p 



wilNamspwl Area Community Coliaga. 
Thud Suae). willlBmapod. PannaylvanM I 
(7tr| 327-4765 Fof InformallOfi raguardir 



Books wanted 

The SPOTLIGHT is continuing to 
collect books to donate to the Lycom- 
ing Literacy Project. 

Books may be delivered to the 
student newspaper office in the base- 
ment of the Academic Center. Or, 
donors may call the SPOTLIGHT, Col- 
lege Ext. 7533, to make arrangements 
tor pick-up. 



About the Cover 

Today's cover for 
Valentine's Day was created by 
James T. (Jim) Doan, 
SPOTLIGHT staff artist who is an 
advertising art student from 
Osceola 



SPOTLIQHT 
Monday, Fab. «, 1t87 ■ Vol. 22, No. 20 

The SPOTLIGHT Is published each Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept lor College vacations, by mass communications and other interested students 
ol The Wlillamsport Area Community College. 

Ofllce: Room 7. Academic Center, 1005 W Third St.. Wlillamsport, Pa. 
17701 Telephone: (717) 326-3761 , Extension 7533 



14 Coo<dlna'or al tha 



LETTERS TO SPOTLIQHT READERS 
and NEWS REPORT CONTRIBUTIONS 

Letters to SPOTLIGHT readers and other contributions should be typed, 
double-spaced and may be hand<arried or sent to the SPOTLIGHT oHice in the 
Academic Center Letters and ail other material submilted lor publication will be 
reviewed by the newspaper stalf and may be rejected with a statement as to 
reason. All letters must be signed; signatures must be authenticated by a member 
of the nev«spapet staff No letter will be published without the writer's name 

STAFF 

Brand! M. Vlb«n • Managing Editor 

Donna M. Trimble • Photography Editor 

Michael Wildron • Bualnaaa/Advenlsing Manager 

Catherine A. Hannon • Senior Staff Writer 

Ruth Ann Hlxaon • Senior StaH Writer 

James Treeae • Contributing Compositor 

Margaret Flanagan • StaH Writer 

James Doan • StaH Artist 

Diane Shsheen • Advertising Production 

Jelt Campanelll • Business/Advertising StaH 



SPORTS CARD Media is focus 



INDOOR TENNIS 

Indoor tennis at the West Branch 
Racquet Club, Monday through Friday, 
9:30 to 1 1 p.m. at cost of $3 per per- 
son. Validated ID must be shown to 
receive this reduced rate. 
KARATE 

There are Shotakan karate classes 
on Monday and Thursday nights, 7 to 
10 p.m. during Spring Semester. This 
class is open to all faculty, staff, and 
students. Free with valid ID. Class runs 
the entire semester unless school 
breaks. 
INDOOR SOCCER 

Indoor soccer league has begun. 
Anyone who wishes to watch is more 
than willing to join in the excitement. 
The league will be every Wednesday 
night, 7 to 10 p.m. for eight weeks. 
SWIMMING 

Swimming hours at the YMCA are 
as follows: Monday, Wednesday, 8:30 
to 9:30 p.m.; Friday, 7:30 to 8:45 p.m.; 
Saturday, 1 to 5:45 p.m.; Sunday, 1 2 to 
4:45 p.m.; Monday through Friday, 3 to 
4 p.m. These are all open swims. Ad- 
mission is $2 with validated College ID. 
TABLE TENNIS 

Interest has been expressed in a 
table tennis tournament Anyone who 
would like to participate may sign up in 
the Rec Center. The date and time will 
be established after signups are com- 
pleted. 
ICE SKATING 

Ice skating at the Williamsporl Ar- 
mory Monday through Thursday, 5 to 9 
p.m. Free with valid ID. 
VOLLEVBALL 

Round robin volleyball has begun. 
II you did not hand in a roster by the 
deadline you are not eligible to par- 
ticipate in the tournament. 
BASKETBALL 

Basketball league has begun play. If 
there are any other teams that wish to 
participate you may pick up a roster in 
the Rec Center and turn it in to Margot 
Bayer in Gym 209. 

Army reps 
to be here 
Wednesday 

Representatives from the Army 
will be on campus this Wednesday, 
from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., to present to 
interested students career oppor- 
tunities within the Army, according to 
Thomas C. Shoff, transfer councelor. 

Topics will Include financial aid, 
loan repayments, and employment 
after graduation. Shoff said, "Students 
can go to college and get dollars from 
the military for full-time enlistment or 
part-time enlistment." 

The program will be held in Room 
B107. LEC. Interested students may 
stop by the Susquehanna Room lobby 
on Wednesday or contact shoff in 
Room 157, LRC for details. 

TYPEWRITER FOR SALE 
Sturdy portable, good condition; 
spells good If given TLC. Call 
323-3988 & make offer, [advt] 



of session 
on Thursday 

"Media in the Classroom" is the ti- 
tle of a presentation scheduled for 
Thursday as part of the Teaching 
Adults in the Community College after- 
noon series being given by the Col- 
lege's Office of Staff and Program 
Development. 

This Thursday's presentation will 
be from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Room A1 21 , 
Lifelong Education Center. Frederick 
T. Gilmour, director of the Instructional 
Media Center, will give the presenta- 
tion. 



Job Ops 



The following employment oppor- 
tunity Information is provided by the 
College's Advisement and Career Ser- 
vices Center as a service to students. 
Questions about listings here should be 
directed to that office which is in the 
Learning Resources Center. 

NURSERY MANAGEMENT — Blr- 

chwood Landscaping, 4 Pine Rd., 
Plains, PA 18705 would like resumes 
from fourth semester nursery manage- 
ment or forest technology students by 
February 1 5. They will have an open- 
ing for a crew chief for residential 
mowing in the Spring. $5-$7 to start. 
Send them to the attention of Joe 
Czarnecki. 

GRAPHIC ARTS — Donnelly Directory 
from Scranton, PA would like to inter- 
view graphic art students on campus If 
there is enough interest. If you would 
like an interview, bring a resume to the 
Advisement Center by February 20. 
GRAPHIC ARTS — Bloomsburg Craft- 
sman, 4411 Old Berwick Rd., 
Bloomsburg, PA 1 781 5 has a second 
shift opening tor a supervisor in their 
pre-press dept. Company manufac- 
tures books. Does everything from 
camera to platemaking. Send a resume 
and a recommendation from a graphic 
arts instructor to Robert Ciero, 
Manager. 

PART-TIME — QRP, P.O. Box 3572, 
Williamsport, PA 17701 has an open- 
ing for a tool crib attendant two or three 
hours a day between 7 a.m. and 3:30 
p.m. Will work around class schedule. 
Send a letter of application to Carol 
Moore, Personnel Representive. 

'Hilarious' film this week 

"Joshua Then and Now" will be 
shown as a Film Society feature Thurs- 
day, Feb. 12 to Sunday, Feb. 15, ac- 
cording to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College activities. 

The movie is directed by Ted Kot- 
cheff and is a "hilarious and touching" 
story of a former convict. 

Ticket holders may attend any film 
this season and may purchase another 
ticket any time. Five admission 
membership — $15, Ten admission 
membership — $25, non-members — 
$4.50 at the door, and Free with Col- 
lege student ID. For futher information 
call 398-7227, 327-1 502, or 326-1 090. 



SPOTLIOHTaMonday, Feb. 9, 19B7a< 




Karen Campbell, Treasury. Graphic Arts, Moscow, PA 



Cindy Kuzma, President, Graphic Arts, Hazlelon, PA 




n 



GET 
officers 
elected 



Gamma Epsllon Tau - the 
College's graphic arts 
fraternity - has elected 
new officers. Among the 
group's early semester 
actlvitlea has bean a 
recruitment effort. 



Vinnie Powers, Vice President 
Graphic Arts, Roselle Park, NJ 




Chris Anderson, Secretary, Graphic Arts, Wllllamsport, PA 



Campus Recruiting 



The following employment opportunity Information is provided by the Col- 
lege's Advisement and Career Services Center as a service to students. Ques- 
tions about listings here should be directed to that office which is in the Learn- 
ing Resources Center. 

Baltimore Life Inc. — will be on campus next Tuesday, Feb. 17, from 1 to 
3:30 p.m. to discuss careers in Insurance with any fourth semester students 
from business and computer Technologies Division. Bring a resume to the Ad- 
visement Center before closing time tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 10, to sign up 
for the meeting on the 1 7th. 

Radio Shack — district office, Wyoming, Pa. representatives will be interview- 
ing fourth semester retail management, business management, and computer 
science students in Room 205A, Learning Resources Center, for manager 
trainees. Bring a resume to the Advisement Center before closing this Friday, 



Feb. 13, In order to sign up for an interview. 

Wels Markets Inc. — will be interviewing fourth semester business manage- 
ment and retail management students on h/larch 19 for manager trainees. Br- 
ing a resume to the Advisement Center before March 1 to sign up for an inter- 
view. 

RIckert Nurseries — Yardley. Pa. will be Interviewing nursery management 
students on Tuesday, Feb. 24. Bring a resume to the Advisement Center 
before this Friday, Feb, 1 3 to sign up for an interview. 



Student Health Insurance... forms available at Student Health 
Services, Room 104, Gym; cut-off date is Feb. 1 5. 



Financial aid 
applications here 

Pennsylvania State and 
Federal Grant Applications and 
the Wllllamsport Area Communi- 
ty College Financial Aid Applica- 
tion for the 1 987-1 988 academic 
year now are available at the 
Financial Aid Office, ACC 201 . 

Students attending the col- 
lege for the summer term and 
next Fall, must file an application 
to be eligible for financial aid. 




4aSPOTLiaHTaMonday, Feb. 9, 1987 

Dressin' Up - Retail Management 




!»,' "^ 



Tim W Tyler 
Montoursville, PA 
Retail Management and 
Business Management 




Visual Merchandising MKT 245- is part 
of the Retail Management curriculum 
course work. Students are given ttie 
opportunity to iearn about the visual 
merchandising field through classroom 
participation and hands-on application 
of the theories. 




Scott A Reilly 
Montoursvillle, PA 
Retail Management and 
Business Management 



Stephanie L. Hillyard 
Avis. PA 

Word Processing and 
Retail Management 




Scott A. Sealover 
Mifflintown, PA 
Retail Management 



SPOTLIQHTDMonday, Fab. 9, 1987a5 

Style... Displays Give Experience 




Terry L White 
Williamsport, PA 
Retail Management 




During the spring semester, as pan of 

the course requirements, the students 
are responsible for the planning and 
design of the displays in the four 
display windows in the Academic 
Center, first floor. Whenever possible, 
opportunities in visual merchandising 
application are available to students to 
work with retailer in our local market 
area. 




Joy R. Porter 
Lock Haven. PA 
Retail Management 



Lisa A. Stephenson 
Towanda, PA 
Retail Management 




Ron L. Bair 
Montgomery, PA 
Retail Management 



BaSPOTLIQHTDMonday, Feb. 9, 1987 



Early Warning 
Cards ready; 
Study Aid Week 
to be held 



Early warning cards are due to be released by the end of the 
fourth week of the semester. The cards are designed to alert 
students "who are not making satisfactory academic progress" to 
the possibility of failure. 

Students who receive warnings may also expect information 
about "Study Aid Week", which will be held during the fifth week 
of classes. The new program is designed to assist students in 
analyzing the study problems and devise strategies to improve 
academic performance. 

According to Lawrence W. l.mery Jr. , director of advisement 
and career services, "students who take an active part in "Study 
Aid Week" are often able to improve academically and avoid being 
on academic probation". 



Vo-Tech awards 
ceremony today 
in Auditorium 



An awards ceremony will be held here today in honor of area 
vo-tech students who have made outstanding achievments in their 
courses. According to Glenda D. McNett* secretary to the director 
of secondary vocational programs, the students will receive a 
tour of the WACC campus and lunch at Le Jeune Chef. 

Dr . Edward Labuda> director of light wave subsystems lab at 
AT&T Bell will be the keynote speaker at the awards ceremony in 
the College Auditorium. It is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. 

The awards ceremony is sponsored by Area Vocational 
Technical Schools CAVTS). 



Feb. 16 holiday 

is down the drift: 

it's snow nrial<e-up day 



Classes missed on Friday, 



Jar 



23, 



1 1 be 



ade 



next 



Monday, Feb. 16 — which was 
written into the College cal- 
endar as a possible "snow 
make-up day" . 

According to Dr. James E. 
Middleton, dean of academic 
affairs., "We are running a 
Friday schedule for the snow 
day make-up of Monday, Feb. 16". 

Dr. Middleton added, 
"Sincf there are few if any 
Friday evening classes , the 
evening hours will be available 
for students and faculty who 
need additional time." 

Any questions students 
have may be referred to the 
student's division office, the 
dean said. 



Damon L.Thompson works 
selected for publication 

Damon L. Thompson, pro- 
fessor of English, has had two 
poems selected for publication 
in a West Coast anthology. 

The publication is due to 
be released this month. 

Thompson was the recipient 
of a Golden Poet Award for 17B5. 
He also received a Silver Poet 
Award from The World of Poetry, 
Cal if ornia. 

During the past year, 
Thompson was named to Who's Who 
In The East; cited in Who's Who 
in America, Dictionary of 
International Biography, Men of 
Achievement, 5,000 Personalities 
of the World, and Personalities 
of the Americas. He also 
received a certificate from the 
American Biographical Institute, 
and other biographical encyclo- 
pedias and reference dictionaries. 



National PBL Week noted this week 



National Phi Beta Lambda Week will be observed by students in colleges 
across the country this week, according to Paul W. Goldfeder. faculty adviser 
lor the PBL Club at the College, 

The objective of PBL Week Is to spread the word in local communities 
about the ciub. Martin T. Green, PBL president, said he received an invitation 
to visit with Stephen J. Lucasi, mayor of Williamsport. Lucasi issued a pro- 
clamation (or Phi Beta Lambda Week. 

PBL will have a free drawing for a Valentine box of candy to be given 
away this Friday. Any student, faculty member, or staff member at the College 
Is eligible to sign up for the drawing, Goldfeder said. The winner will be an- 
nounced in the SPOTLIGHT. Interested persons may sign up In the PBL office. 
Room 3, basement. Academic Center. 

Pennsylvania Phi Beta Lambda Leadership Conference will be held in 
State College on March 27, 28, and 29, Goldfeder said. All PBL members in- 
terested in attending or in participating in the Business Subject Competition 
must have their entries in no later Sunday, March 1 . Entry forms are available 



In the PBL office or from Goldfeder, Room 305, Academic Center. 

The Region Seven FBLA Spring Conference will be held at the College on 
Saturday, March 7. The local PBL Club will host over 500 students from 12 
high schools In central Pennsylvania. President Martin T. Green, a business 
management student from Williamsport, said he will be on hand to welcome 
the students. The group will conduct their regular business meeting and elect 
officers for the coming year. 

The Phi Beta Lambda Club meets every other Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. in 
Room 329 of the Academic Center. The next meeting Is tomorrow. 




'Chance to gain 
insight' says Dr. Walker 

By Cathy Hannon, SPOTLIGHT staff writer 

Six students from the College attended ttie 1 1tti Annual Model United Na- 
tions Conference Wednesday. Jan. 28 to Sunday, Feb. 1 . in Cleveland, Otiio. 

The students include four general studies students - John D. Rue from 
Wllliamsport, Janet K. Ulsamer from Williamsport, Jean C. Wool from Linden, 
and Matthew T. Young from South Williamsport; an advertising art student, 
Teresa L. Wentzler from Montoursville, and a broadcasting student, Jerry E. 
Neece from Williamsport. 

The conference is a chance for students to simulate events in a United Na- 
tions session. Students participating need to be familiar with world relations, 
and parliamentary procedure. 

According to Dr. Thomas Walker, associate professor of history and 
government at the College, the students chose the committees on which they 
were to serve. Wool was in the general planning committee, Wentzler was in 
the committee on human rights, Neece and Rue were in a special political 
committee, and Ulsamer and Young were in a special committee on Ter- 
rorism. 

The special committee on terrorism won an honorable mention award at 
the conference. The committee managed to write, present, and getpassed two 
resolutions on terrorism. 

Dr. Walker said this event was a chance for the students to "gain wonder- 
ful insight into intercollegiate activity as well as a working knowledge of the 
U.N." 

Walker said the College represented itself well, considering the students 
competition was other students from forms of higher-up education and 
graduate students from various universities. 

Walker added that there were 1 06 colleges in attendance and there were 
very few community colleges represented. 

The cost of the conference was funded by a grant in aid from Penn Pacie, 
a grant for international education from Penn State,and by private donations 
from people and businesses. Students also went out on their own to get dona- 
tions. 

Donors include: Video World; Deliverance Lifetime Sports, Frank DeAn- 
drea; Jack Wool; Kevin Hastings; Liebert, Short, Fitzpatrick, and Lavin; Dr. 
Robert W. Wolfe, and Dr. Daniel J. Doyle. 

The College provided automobiles for transportation, and students paid 
their own registration fee. 

Or. Walker said, "This was a worthwhile learning experience. Hopefully, 
the College will be able to return again and come back with greater 
knowledge. " 

Student groups' budgets due Feb. 16 

All student organizations must submit College Activities Budget Requests 
for 1987-1988 by next Monday, Feb. 16 to the Recreation Center, Room 
A1 37, Lifelong Education Center, according to Ms. Kathy L. Cobb, College ac- 
tivities assistant. 

Requests for money must be accompanied by a 1986-1987 Request 
Form and a 1 986-1 987 College Activities Report and Evaluation. These forms 
are available by request from Ms. Cobb in the Recreation Center, or by calling 
College Ext. 4763^ 




JOE M IGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

'One Block from W.A.C.C. 
DAILY SPECIALS 

Hours: Moo.Sal, II i.m. lo 9 p.m. Clostd Sundiy ' 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Regular Sub Whole 

Meatball Whole 

Turkey Whole 

Ham Whole 

Tuna Whole 

Cheese Steak Whole 



$1,70 
$1,85 
$1,50 
$1,90 
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•Subs All Handmade to Order | 

•Honiv'made Meatballs & Sauce * 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs I 



•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" 

\ $4 20 WHOLE $2 10 HALF 






SPOTLIQHTa Monday, Feb. 9, 19B7d7 





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10 Extinct b 

13 Private-e 

14 Ten-comiHi 

15 Bondman 

16 "What's - 
like you. 

17 of tl 

18 The Kings 



21 One who attempt' 

22 Hise-en 



SI Bowler's nemesi- 

53 Ease 

54 Consigned 

58 funereal item 

59 Anna Hoffo, for 



23 B. 

24 Populai 

27 Crone 

28 Popula 

29 Constr 
31 In an . 

36 f 



43 Hiss Horera 

44 Nobel priz( 
in Chemisti 

45 Oroop 



60 Slur, in mus 

61 Infant 

62 Uord with ho 

63 Arthur Hi lie 

64 Football mea 
(abbr.) 

65 Forwarded 

66 Foe 



1 Lesion mar 

2 Alley 

3 "Odyssey" 

"Aeneid" 



10 badge 

11 Bay window 

12 In front of 
15 Banner 

20 Turn a eai 

21 Voice part 

23 Ralph Kramden": 



26 Mexic 
■ 28 Certain operation 
30 Conducive to 
health 

32 Exist 

33 Satanic 

34 Apollo's instrumei 

35 Certain votes 

37 Director Mervyn — 

41 Meet a poker bet 

42 Saga 
46 Laugh 

48 Kind of cat 

49 Homer work 

50 The cofimon people 

51 Mickey Mantle's 
number 

52 Claw 

54 Ready 

55 Exam-ending word 

56 Outch cheese 

57 Oisavow 

59 Two, in Toledo 



nib Week's Puzzk Bmug/it lo You By... 

Cathy's Diner 

1170 W. 4th SI. * WilUunsport, P«. 17701 * Phone 323-3224 



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One coupon per customer. Cany out only At participating locatloru 



SaSPOTUOHTDMonday, F»b. 9, 1987 

Landesberg 
to be here 
on Feb. 21; 
tickets 
available 

Steve Landesberg will be appear- 
ing at ttie Scottish Rite Auditorium at 8 
p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 21 as pari ol 
the Performing Artists Series, accor- 
ding to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremlotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

Landesberg is a versatile come- 
dian who gained tame as Sgt. Authur 
Deitrich on the Barney Miller TV series. 
During his six years on the show, he 
was nominated for three consecutive 
Emmy Awards. 

Landesberg's "off the wall" humor 
has been seen on numerous television 
shows and at performances at concert 
hails and in colleges across the coun- 
try, according to a handout from (i^s. 
Fremlotti. 

Landesberg also played the 
Vienese Violinist on the Paul Sand 
show, Friends and Lovers. He was 
chosen Entertainer of the Year for 
1985-B6 by the National Association of 
Campus Activities, an award given to 
the most popular comedian The open- 
ing act will be the comedy of Mike 
Reynolds. 

Tickets for "The Comedy of Steve 
Landesberg" are available In the Col- 
lege Activities Office in the Gym, B&S 
Picture Frames, 400 fvlarket St., and 
the Caboose Restaurant, 500 Pine St., 
Us. Fremlotti said. 

Tickets cost $1 for non-reserved 
seals and $1 5 for reserved. 

NEED A RIDE? 
Students who need rides: Adver- 
tise In The SPOTLIGHT! 

QOLF CLUBS FOR SALE 
Irons, bag. Call 323-3988 after 6 p.m. 
for description and to discuss price. 

FOR SALE 
Hard-working manual, portable 
typewriter. Good condition. Call 
323-3988 after 6. 




Landesberg: Make 'em laugh 



Piercy here 
Wednesday 

Ivlarge Piercy, author and poet, 
will be featured at a book review/dinner 
this Wednesday. 

The book review will begin at 5 
p.m. in LeJeune Chef followed by a 
dinner at 5:45. There will be no charge 
for the book review, but reservations 
are required. 

A workshop involving Is^iss 
Piercy's work will be held next 
W/ednesday, Feb. 18, at 2 p.m. in the 
Professional Development Center. 
There is no charge for the workshop, 
but reservations are requested. 

A reading and commentary on 
Piercy's work is scheduled in the 
Academic Center Auditorium, next 
W/ednesday, Feb. 18, at 7 p.m. Admis- 
sion is free for students, faculty, and 
staff with a valid College ID, Those 
without IDs, the cost is $2, covering the 
cost of the author party. 

After the reading and commen- 
tary, an author party will be held at the 
College Bookstore, LRC. f^iss Piercy's 
latest book will be available for pur- 
chase. 

N^iss Piercy's visit Is being spon- 
sored by the Women's Series. 

The Women's Series is sponsored 
by the College, the Women's Forum, 
The Ivlulticultural Society, The 
Bookstore, the Williamsport YWCA, 
and B&S Picture Frames. This series is 
also being supported by a grant from 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
Council on the Arts and the 
Williamsport Foundation. 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Feb. 9 through Sunday, Feb. 15 
MEETINGS 

SGA Executive. ..3 p.m., tomorrow, Feb. 10, Room B107, LEG. 

Alpha Omega... 7 to 9 p.m, tomorrow, Feb. 1G, Room 133, 
ACC. 

Narcotics Anonymous... every Wednesday, 7 p.m., Room 
B107, LEG. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... business meeting every Tuesday from 
noon to 1 p.m.. Room B107, LEG. 

Delta Phi Omega... 12:30 p.m., tomorrow, Feb. 10, Room 107, 
ACC. 

Human Services Club... 3:30 p.m., this Thursday, Feb. 12, 
Room 229, ACC. 

Student Housing... 6 p.m., this Wednesday, Feb. 11, Room 
B107, LEG. 

Blood Mobile... special meeting, 4 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 24, 
Room B107, LEG. 

SALES, FUND-RAISERS 

Flower Sale... Horticulture Club, 9 a.m., Friday, Feb. 13, ACC 
Lobby and LEG Foyer. 

Hot Dog/Bake Sale... SADHA, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednes- 
day, Feb. 1 1 , ACC lobby. Hot Dogs are $.75 for a regular and $1 
with kraut or chile. 

"Sweets for your Sweetheart" lollipop sale... from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m., this Thursday, Feb. 12, AGG lobby and LEG foyer. Lollipops 
are $.50 each and the money will go to the Multiple Sclerosis Fund. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

City Bus... Students with validated ID may ride at reduced 
rates. Info from College Activities Office, Gym. 

Swimming... W.A.C.C. students who are not members of the 
YMCA may use pool during certain hours; contact College Ac- 
tivities Office for up-to-minute listing on hours; $2 per person 
charge with W.A.C.C. ID. 

Movie Tickets... UA movie tickets now available in College 
Bookstore, $2.75 each. (Cost increased by 25 cents by UA.) Spon- 
sored by SGA. 

Student Health Insurance... forms available at Student Health 
Services, Room 1 04, Gym; cut-off date is Feb. 1 5. 

Student Health Services... Room 104, Gym. Registered nurse 
on duty to treat minor illness and refer to physician or facility most 
capable of providing additional treatment. Hours are 8 a.m. to 3:30 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 

ACTIVITIES 

Valentine's Dance... sponsored by Gamma Epsilon Tau, 9 to 
12 p.m., this Wednesday, Feb. 11, Susquehanna Room. Price: 
$1 .50 with ID and $2 without ID. 

Films sponsored by the Film Society... from 7:30 to 1 0:30 p.m., 
this Thursday and Friday, Feb. 12 and 13, ACC Auditorium. 



Cillo's 


LUNCH SPECIAL 


College Corner 


THIS WEEK 

WHOLE REGULAR • SUB 




$2.10 WHOLE REGULARLY $2.40 T..M 




SPECIAL-SPECIAL: HALF $1.08 


PHONE 322-1321 






Pla; LUCKY NUMBERS 


1100 W. Third St. 


AND WIN A HALF SUB 


(Next to the Academic Center) 


Four Winners Each Week! 


HOURS* 


^iSsSS^ 


Mod. thm nun. 


BREAKFAST SPECIAm^ 


7:30 •.in. to 6 p.m. 


THIS WTEK ^4 




HAM*CHEESE*EGG ON MUFFIN 


Fridi;, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 


$1.35 HEGULAf^LY $1 66 




HOLIDAYS 
AND SUNDAYS 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



)MACC ARCHIVES 




'Sgt. Dietrich' gets booked 
in Billtown this weekend 

Steve Landesberg, the Sgt. Arthur Dietrich of '■Barney Miller" 
is booked in Billtown - Billtown is toca/eze tor Williamsport - this 
weekend. 

The comedian is scheduled to perform at 8 p.m. in the Scottish 
Rite Auditorium as part of the College's performing Artist Series. 

fulike Reynolds will provide warm-up humor prior to 
Landesberg's appearance. 

Ticket information for students and public is available by 
visiting or calling (327-4763) the College Activities Office in the 
Gym. 



SPOTLIGHT 

Monday, Feb. 16, 1987 • Vol. 22, No. 21 • 8 Pages 
Wllllamsporl Area Community College • Wllllamspoil, Pa. 17701 




Financial aid applications 
and grant applications 
available: deadline May 1 

The Pennsylvania State and Federal Grant Applications and the College's 
Financial Aid application for the 1 987-1 988 academic year now are available 
in the Financial Aid Office, Room 201 , Academic Center, according to Donald 
S Shade, financial aid director. 

Shade emphasized that every student who wishes to receive financial aid 
next year, including summer terms, must complete and submit new applica- 
tions. 

Students who have not received 
an application in the mail should pick 
one up in the Financial Aid Office, he 
said. 

Shade said "it is very important" 
that students file their applications ear- 
ly. The filing deadline is Ivlay 1 , 1987, 
but every effort should be made to get 
the application in the mail by mid- 
Ivlarch, he said. This will ensure that 
the student will receive consideration 
for very aid program available. 

Every aid applicant should, he ad- 
ded, complete the College's financial 
aid application and the Pennsylvania 
State Grant Application even if he or 
she only plans to apply for a student 
loan. 

Under new federal regulations, he 
explained. Colleges will be required to 
take information off the grant applica- 
tion in order to process a request for a 
student loan. 

Shade said that any student 
needing aid applications or having 
questions about completion of the 
forms may visit the Financial Aid Of- 



SGA marking 
'Bust MS Month' 

February is "Bust MS Month" 
and the College's Student Govern- 
ment Association, as part of the 
Students Against Multiple Sclerosis 
organization, will sponsor a dance 
next Thursday, according to Ms. 
Kathy L. Cobb, SGA adviser. 

Proceeds from the dance as wall 
as last week's lollipop sale will be 
donated, the adviser said. 




HMMM, Good! - Dental Hygiene students held a hot dog/bake sale in the 
Academic Center lobby to raise money for expenses associated with Nor- 
theast Regional Boards. Pictured are Kimberly A. Simeon, of Mechanlcsburg; 
Barbara J.Cook, of Sellnsgrove; Brenda M. Pascarella, of Bradford; karen L. 
SImpkins, of Quakertown; Melanle K. Martin of Lock Haven; Theresa A. 
Hagenbuch, of Danville, and, with back to camera, Harold Hauper, of 
Mlllersburg. 



flee. Room 201 , ACC. 

Books wanted 

The SPOTLIGHT is continuing to 
collect books to donate to the Lycom- 
ing Literacy Project. 

Books may be delivered to the 
student newspaper office in the base- 
ment of the Academic Center. Or, 
donors may call the SPOTLIGHT 



Student groups' budgets 
due today to activities aide 

All student organizations must submit College Activities Budget Requests 
for 1 987-1 988 by the end of the day today, Ivlonday, Feb. 1 6 in the Recreation 
Center, Room A137, Lifelong Education Center, according to Ivls. Kathy L. 
Cobb, College activities assistant and SGA adviser. 

Requests for money from this year's allocations should be received at the 
Please turn to Page 5 



SGA officers 
elected 

Student Government Association 
(SGA) officers were elected during a 
regularly-scheduled Senate meeting in 
late January. 

A vice president is to be elected 
this month. 

Those elected are Susan K. 
Baumer. culinary arts student from 
Hughesville, treasurer; William C. 
Calvert Jr., electrical technology stu- 
dent from Duncansville, parliamen- 
tarian/student action officer; Barry A. 
Rathmell, electronics technology stu- 
dent from North Bend, program plann- 
ing officer, and Jeffrey D. Eskra, con- 
struction carpentry student from 
Williamsport, student awareness of- 
ficer. 

Serving on the budget committee 
are l^ls. Baumer; Karen L. Campbell, 
graphic arts student from Moscow, and 
Brian J. Winters, culinary arts student 
from Brookville. 

Bus trips 
planned to D.C. 
and New Yorl( 

According to Ms, JoAnn R 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities, there will be a bus trip to New 
York City, on Saturday, March 28, 

The bus will leave from in front of 
the Learning Resources Center 6 a.m. 
and from New York City at 9 p.m. 

There will also be a bus trip to 
Washington, D.C. on Saturday, April 
11. 

The bus leaves from in front of the 
Learning Resources Center at 6 a.m. 
and from DC. at 9 p.m. 

The coordinator said additional 
details would be reported later, but that 
she wanted to report the dates now to 
help interested persons plan. 



2nSPOTLIGHTDMonday, Feb. 16, 1987 



Stout's novels offer 
Epicurean readability 



By Jeff Campanelll, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Reading a biography is usually a sobering experience :one neither handily 
associated with merriment, nor persued by the reader with any marked sense 
of gusto. 

Biographies generally exhibit of themselves to be writing of a rather dry, 
informative nature, and as such are inevitably discarded by the unknowing 
public in search of a book that offers the reader a somewhat more enjoyable 
experience. 

This attitude of abject doggedness maintained by these people (of whom I 
used to be one, I might add) has been dealt the proverbial "shattering blow" in 
a biography by John McAleer entitled flex Sloul; The Life and Times of the 
Creator of Nero Wolfe. 

This knowledge comes as little or no surprise to the cognoscente of the 
Nero Wolfe chronicles, the peculiar and persistant Wolfe Pack, but those are 
not familiar with Rex Stout's orchid-growing, beer-quaffing, sedentary private 
detective, need only read one of his unexampled mysteries to be cognizant of 
all the hoopla which they command. 

In biographing Ivlr. Stout's life, John McAleer's efforts are exceeded only 
by the greatness of the man whose life he is writing about. Relentlessly digging 
through Ivlr. Stout's private files, amounting to some twelve-hundred folders of 
information, it is his task alone owing to f^r. Stout's avowed dislikes of 
autobiographies. Says Stout, "I feel that the time and energy that I would ex- 
pend writing my autobiography would be better utilized by focusing my efforfs 
toward their prescribed proclivity. I also feel that undertaking to write one 
would be a boring exercise, and if I'm not having any fun writing a book, then 



no one is going to have any fun reading it." 

Born in Kansas in 1 886, young Rex Stout excelled in his first years of 
schooling and by the age of ten had toured the state as it's champion speller 
and arithmetic prodigy. As he grew older, wanderlust overtook him and by his 
mid-teens had traveled throughout the United States holding as part-time jobs 
position of stablehand, bookkeeper, sight-seeing guide, salesman, 
dishwasher, carnival crier, and hotel manager. At the age of seventeen he 
enlisted in the army and was chosen to be his barracks' commander. Swiftly, 
he was elevated to the office of accounts manager aboard President 
Roosevelt's private yacht, the Ivlayflower, where his Interests were held only 
briefly as he decided to purchase from the government the remaining six mon- 
ths of his tour of duty and settle for the rest of his long life near the ever-alive 
and effervescent city of New York. 

Here, he and his brother Bob devised and implemented a school banking 
system which was installed in over four-hundred cities throughout the country. 
In 1 927 Mr. Stout retired from the world of finance and repaired himself to High 
t^eadow, his home straddling the New York-Conneticut border located 60 
miles north of New York City in a small town called Brewster, where he was to 
pen his first Nero Wolfe mystery, Fer-De-Lance. Since then, nearly 100 Nero 
Wolfe novels and novellas have been published in thirty-six languages 
throughout the world, delighting readers with his testy brilliance and immense 
idiosyncrasies. 

Introduce yourself to biography through Ivlr. l\/1cAleers' masterpiece and 
dispel the notion that all biographies are merely an untenable waste of time. 



Theatre Caravan presentation next Saturday 



The Philadelphia Theatre Caravan 
will present "We've Stories to Tell... of 
Africa" as part of the Children's Series 
on next Saturday, Feb, 28, according 
to Ivls. JoAnn R Fremiotti, coordinator 
of College activities. Showings will be 
at 2 p.m. at the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association (YWCA), Wllliamsport 
and at 7 p.m. on the North Campus, 
Wellsboro. 

"We've Stories to Tell... of Africa" 
is a presentation of three folktales 
adapted for the stage by Geraldine 
Custer, a staff member of the An- 
nenberg Center. 

"Sun and fvloon" is a myth about 
origins, a "how did it happen?" story. 
The story presents the sun and the 
moon as two human beings and ex- 
plains why one is brighter than the 
other. 



, Collet, 1 



"Wanto and the Shapeless Thing " 
is a heart desire/wish story. Wanto 
hides the "shapeless thing" which pro- 
mises to grant his wishes as long as he 
will allow no one else to see it. 

"Talk" is a story in which in- 
animate objects talk. A farmer hears 
a yam, a dog, a palm branch, and a 
stone. He tells other people and they 
laugh at him until they hear objects talk 
too. 

The stories are based on African 
folktales adapted for the stage 
Costumes and scenic designs were 
created by Loyce Arthur. Arthur Hall, 
who directs and choreographs the pro- 

Your 
Opinion? 

There is a growing debate over 
the advertising of various so- 
called personal products on 
television. 

What is your opinion? 

Next week's SPOTLIGHT will 
begin a new - but yet, familiar 
"feature: Readers Say. We offer 
our readers a chance to com- 
ment on topics of the day. 

Write us... or drop in... and tell us 
what you think - in 25 words or 
less -- about television advertis- 
ing of personal products. 

Seeking Adventure, Relief from tfie 
fiumdrum? Apply for SPOTLIGHT 
staff memberstilplll 



duction, is founder and artistic director 
of the Arthur Hall Afro-American 
Dance Ensemble. 

The presentation Is sponsored by 
the College, North Carfipus, the Ivlulti- 
Cultural Society, the Wllliamsport 
YWCA, and the Greater Wllliamsport 
Community Arts Council. This series is 
supported by a grant from the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania Council on 
the Arts and the Wllliamsport Founda- 
tion 

Also showing in the Childrens 



Series will be The Puppet Factory with 
"Firebird" on March 28 and Duet Pro- 
ductions with "Peter Pan" on April 4, 
Ms. Fremiotti said. 

Tickets cost $5 per person of all 
three performances or $2 for individual 
performances. Those wishing tickets 
or further information, call 327-4763 
extension 7269. Or they may send a 
check with name, address, and 
telephone number to College Ac- 
tivities, Wllliamsport Area Community 
College, 1005 W Third St. 
Wllliamsport, Pa 17701-5799 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday. F«b. 16. 1987 • Vol. 22, No. 21 

Ttie SPOTLIGHT is published eacti r/Ionday morning of tile academic year, ex 
cept (or College vacations, by mass communications and ottier interested students 
of Ttie Williamsport Area Community Coiiege 

OHice: Room 7. Academic Center, 1005 W. Ttiird St., Williamsporl, Pa 
17701. Teleptione: (717) 326-3761, Extension 7533. 



LETTERS TO SPOTLIGHT READERS 
and NEWS REPORT CONTRIBUTIONS 

Letters to SPOTLIGHT readers and other contributions should be typed, 
double-spaced and may be hand-carried or sent lo the SPOTLIGHT oflice in the 
Academic Center Leners and all other material submitted (or publication wilt be 
reviewed by the newspaper sta(( and may be rejected with a statement as to 
reason All letters must be signed; signatures must be authenticated by a member 
of the newspaper staff No letter will be published without the writer's name 

STAFF 

Branda M. Vlbert • Managing Editor 

Donna M. Trimble • Photograptiy Editor 

Michael Waldron • Bualneaa/Adverllslng Manager 

Catherine A. Hannon • Senior Staff Writer 

Ruth Ann Hlxson • Senior Staff Writer 

James Treeae • Contributing Compositor 

Margaret Flanagan • Staff Writer 

James Doan • Staff Artist 

Diane Slialieen • Advertising Production 

Jeff Campaneili • BusinesstAdvertlsIng Staff 

Tim Neldig • Graptilc Arts Technician 

Anthony N. Clllo • Contributing Faculty Adviser 



SPOTLIQHTDMonday, Feb. 16, 198703 





44 


Vane direction 


14 


Scarum's counter- 












1 Becomes dim 


47 


Compositions for 


11. 


Ending for snicker 


6 Decorative con- 


48 


Batting 


19 


Surround with 
trouble 


11 Stately dance 


il 


Lanchester and 


?2 


Discharged in a 


12 Hatred 




Maxwell 




steam 


14 Metric land measur 


e 51 


Be nosy 


23 


Periods of rule 


15 Lampoons 


52 


Walked in water 


26 


Work in burlesque 


17 Soviet cooperative 


53 


Go back over 


■/I 


Tropical fruit 


18 Non-conmercial 


5S 


Nail polishes 


in 


Switch position 


network 


5/ 


Figure of speech 


32 


Art of printing 


20 Impish 


58 


Irks 




(abbr.) 


21 Journalist 


sg 


Latin for dog 


,14 


A short while ago 


Jacob 


h(l 


Lively dances 




(2 wds.) 


22 Catch, as a line 






35 


Beautiful women 


drive 






36 


Pertaining to 










disputation 


25 Italian numeral 


1 


Science 


38 


Guides 


26 Upset 


2 


Feeds the kitty 


39 


Hest coast ball 


28 Curved letter 


3 


Twofold 




club 


29 Unvaried voice 


4 


Poetic contraction 


40 


Exigencies 


31 Revolutionary Uar 


S 


Doing a dance 


41 


Sumner drink 


general 


f> 


Feudal tenant 


43 


Coins of India 


33 Parsimony 


7 


Santa 


46 


Italian city 


36 Suit 


H 


Location 


48 


Dromedary 


37 Coach's strategy 


9 Monsieur Zola 


50 


Spahn's tearmtate 


(2 wds.) 


10 


Finish skin diving 


52 Salary 


41 Conmon suffix 


Jl 


Variety of sheep 


S4 


Roman 151 


42 Reads 


13 


Sixes, in Spanish 


56 


Compass direction 



ITiis Week's Puzzle Brought to You By... 

Cathy's Diner 

1170 W, 4tli St. * WilUamsport, Pa. 17701 • Phone 323-3224 



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Puzzle answer on page 7 



Name changed 

for weight loss 

program 

The name of the College's weight 
loss program has been changed to 
simply that - Weight Loss Program - 
from the previous identification as 
C.H.I. P. (Comprehensive Health Im- 
provement Program), according to 
Mrs. Janet Querimit, College nurse. 

Mrs. Querimit also reported at 
weel<'s end that the Weight Loss Pro- 
gram has 76 College employees par- 
ticipating in it. 

She added that there was hardly 
any response from students who 
wanted to be in the program. 

There are 1 4 teams in the pro- 
gram, trying to lose a total of 1 ,049.5 
pounds by mid-April. 

So far, a total of 250 and 1/4 
pounds have been shed. 

The Weight Loss Program started 
Wednesday, Jan. 28. Last Wednesday 
was the second "weigh-in day". 

- By Cathy Hannon, Sanlor Staff Writer 




i 





W.A.C.C.'s No. 1 
Radio Station 

For Ihe Best in Rock' n' Roll 
Rock that Rolls * Old and New! 



Teresa Wetitzler 
Advertising Art 
Montoursvllle 

College's 
'U.N. team' 



The College's participants In 
tlie 11th Annual Model United Na- 
tions Conference returned from 
Cleveland, Ohio, with various ex- 
periences behind them. Besides tak- 
ing part In various debates, team 
members heard lectures from 
various political leaders. Dr. Thomas 
Walker, associate professor of 
history and government, said he 
hopes to again represent the College 
at future conferences. 



Jerry E. Neece 
Broadcasting 
Williamsport 



Janet K. Ulsamer 

Secondary Ed/ttlstory 

Williamsport 




Jean C. Wool 
Pre-Law 
Linden 



Matthew T. Young 

Political Science 

and Quantitative History/Law 

South Williamsport 



4 DSPOTLIQHTD Monday, Feb. 16, 1987 



JOB OPS 



Information is provided by Lawrence W. Emery Jr.. director of Advise- 
ment and Career Services. Inquiries should be directed to that office in the 
Learning Resources Center [Ed.] 



Newcomer Contractors, 1663 Andrews Place. Williamsport. would like 
resumes from LPN, CC & CB graduates. 

Or. Asher B. Carey, Box 88, Selbyville, DE 19975. (between Ocean City 
and Rehobeth Beach, Md.) would like resumes from DH graduates for full-time 
employment, A two-dentist office. 

SI. Onge Huff Planners, 617 W fj^arket. Box M-A2. York. Pa, 17405. 
wants AT resumes sent to Jack Sands. They hire W.A,C,C, graduates regular- 
ly 

Mann t Parker Lumber Co., Box 18. Constitution Avenue, New 
Freedom. PA 1 7349 has two sales positions open for forestry grads. Send a 
resume or call Sharon French, personnel manager. 

Kreamer Feed Store, P.O. Box 38, Kreamer, PA 17833 has an opening 
for an AGB graduate. Send a resume to Billy Robinson, personnel manager. 

Saxhilla Farms A Saxtonaire Holstelns, RO 1 . Box 68. Grandville Sum- 
mit. PA 16916 (Bradford County) would like resumes or telephone calls from 
dairy herd management graduates for assistant herdsman and also crop work. 
Call Steve Saxton. 

Matt RInker Builder, Box 19, Hillsgrove, PA 18619 (Sullivan County) 
would like resumes from CC & CB graduates for vinyl siding, roofing and addi- 
tions. 

TAD, 1 58 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 1 4607, would like resumes from 
RA, AT, Alvl, AU, CB, CT, ED, ET, I^G, TT, ID, TD, PL, and Tl graduates for 
possible employment in a 25-mile radius of Rochester, 

Gilbert Associates Inc., Box 1496, Reading, PA 19603, wants FR & CT 
resumes sent to Robert D, Grosser, chief of surveying. 

GP Contract Staff, 1628 E. Iwlarket St., York, PA 17403, would like AT 
resumes sent to Cheryl McCurdy. 

North Central PA Planning ft Development Commission, P.O Box 
488, Ridgway, PA 1 5853. would like resumes from fy^G and TT graduates from 
Elk County sent to Cliff Patrick, job developer, lor possible employment in that 
area. 




RECOGNIZING EXCELLENCE - From left. Dr. Dennis RIngllng. exemplary 
program Instruction; Gov. Robert P. Casey; Or. Edward M. Qeer, secondary 
vocational programs director, and Dr. William R.Logan, acting state secretary 
of education. Gov. Robert P. Casey presents awards to four Pennsylvania 
schools for "exemplary" vocational technical programs. [Courtesy Photo] 

College gets 1 of 4 
'exemplary' awards 

College Information Office 

As part of the state's observance of National Vocational Education Week, 
Feb, 9 through 1 3, Gov Robert P, Casey last week presented awards to four Pen- 
nsylvania schools for the "exemplary" vocational-technical programs and en- 
couraged other schools to examine "these models of excellence". 

One of the four schools was the high school program at the Williamsport 
Area Community College. 

On hand to receive the award from the governor was Dr.Dennis RIngling. 
forestry instructor whose program received the exemplary status, and Dr. Ed- 
ward M. Geer, director of the secondary programs at the College, 



H. F. Bosenberg ft Son Corp., 1186 Livingston Ave , North Brunswick, 
N.J. 08902, has openings for FL, FR, and NM graduates. They are a land- 
scape and tree business. Send a resume to H. F. Bosenberg. 

Rubwrlght Construction, P.O. Box 220, Shoemakersville. PA 19555, 
has openings for CB and CC graduates for concrete work, S&O g -i^jies for 
site preparation with heavy equipment. Send resume to Ted Rubwrlght, 

Woodland Builders, RD 1. Ivluncy Valley, PA 17758. has openings for 
CC, EL, and PL graduates to work in Eastern Lycoming, Bloomsburg, and 
Sullivan County area. 

Hess's, Lycoming H^all, Ivluncy, PA 1 7756, wants RIvl resumes for 
manager trainees. Would start in Lyco Ivlall, transfer to Allentown store for 
training, then be placed in any of the stores as buyers or store managers, 

Faylor MIddiecreek, P O Box 1 77, Winfield, PA 1 7889, has opening for 
spring graduates in WE and DM. Would be working on construction and con- 
struction trucks. Send a resume to Lana Rote. 

St. Joseph's Medical Center, 667 N. Church St.. Hazleton, PA 18201, 
welcomes resumes from spring graduates in ST, LPN, RT, and NIvl, Send to 
the attention of Terry Purcell, employment manager. 

J. Haines Shetzer Associates, 339-Rear N. Duke St.. Lancaster, PA 
1 7604, has an opening for a field man and a surveyor assistant and welcomes 
FR and CT resumes. 

Bloomsburg Hospital, 549 E. Fair St., Bloomsburg, PA 1 781 5, would like 
resumes from BA, CB, BT, CC. DT, HS, LPN, RT, BS, ST, and WP graduates. 
Send to Carol B. Clark, personnel assistant. 

Technical Temporaries, 44 Bridge St.. Corning, NY 14830, would like 
resumes from RA, AT, CT. CS, CO, ED, EL, EO, ET, TT. IVIG, ID. PL, BS, Tl. 
TD, WE, and WP graduates. They place students within a 75-mile radius of 
Corning. Send to Lori Faucett, technical director. 

Walton General Contracting, Box 269, RD 1 , Langhorne, PA 19047, has 
both immediate and spring openings for CC and CB graduates. Send a resume 
to Ken Walton or call (21 5) 750-0394. 

Kiancer Construction, W. Creek Road. St, Marys, PA 1 5857, has an 
opening for an ED, AT, or ID to determine masonry materials needed from 
blueprints, etc. Send a resume to Rudy Klancer. 



PART-TIME 
BroDart, Arch Street. Williamsport, PA, has several openings for part-time 
data entry persons for different shifts about 25 hours a week. The 1 0:30 p.m. 
to 2:30 shift works 20 hours. Interested students should go to the Arch Street 
personnel office and let BroDart personnel know they are students. 



INTERVIEWS 

Radio Shack, Wyoming, PA - Deadline for resumes from fourth semester 
Rlul, Bl«l, and CS students desiring interviews was Friday, Feb. 13. Interviews 
are being held next fulonday, Feb. 23. 

Baltimore Life inc. - A representative from Baltimore Life will be in LRC 
205A from 1 to 3:30 p.m. tomorrow to discuss careers in insurance/finances 
with any fourth semester students from Business and Computer Technologies 
Division. 



Wilkes College 
representative 
to visit College 

Frank Kamus. a representative 
from Wilkes College, will be on cam- 
pus tomorrow between 10 a.m. and 2 
p.m., according to Thomas C. Shoff, 
transfer counselor. 

Shoff said Kamus will be in the 
lobby outside the Susquehanna Room 
and will have information about new 
transfer scholarships available at 
Wilkes. 

The new scholarships will range 
from $500 to $1 ,000. 

For more information, students 
may stop by the lobby or contact Shoff, 
in the Learning Resources Center. 
Room 157. 

FOR SALE 
Hard-working manual, portable 
typewriter. Good condition. Call 
323-3988 after 6. 



DO YOU... 
HAVE... 

INPUT? 

QUESTIONS? 

CONCERNS? 

SUGGESTIONS? 

IDEAS? 



Tell... SGA! 

Room A138-LEC 

or 

Call Ext. 7248 



SPOTLIQHTOMonday, Feb. 16, 1987d5 



Special chairs positioned as aid for the handicapped 



Two EVAC chairs have been installed in the 
stairwells opposite the elevators on the second 
and third floors of the Academic Center, accor- 
ding to Mrs. Ivlarijo B. Williams, coordinator of 
Vocational Diagnostic Services for Handicapped 
Individuals. 

The lightweight chairs are for use in transpor- 
ting persons who cannot walk down the stairs in 
case of emergency during which the elevator 
might be inoperable, she explained. 

A five-minute training video is available in the 



Library. Mrs, Williams said, "I strongly encourage 
all students and faculty who are nonambulatory or 
who teach students in wheelchairs or on crutches 
to view this tape." 

Instruction diagrams showing how to use the 
chairs will be placed near them. 

The chairs were installed at a cost of $t ,61 7. 
Four more chairs are expected to be installed 
within the next six months on the fourth floor of the 
Academic Center, in the Library, and in the new 



Advanced Technology and Health Sciences 
Center, Mrs. Williams said. 

Mrs. Williams added that "care should be 
taken to preserve these chairs for the use of the 
handicapped." She emphasized that the chairs are 
for use in emergencies only. 

Mrs, Williams said she is suggesting that han- 
dicapped persons who may have need of the 
chairs develop a buddy system with someone and 
learn how to use the chairs. 



Practical nursing students take part 
in campus, community service projects 



Third semester practical nursing 
students participated in two events in 
keeping with Health Week, Feb. 1 to 
for blood pressure, 52 for blood sugar, 
and 21 for vision. 

The nursing department personnel 
thanked Wasserott's Inc. for donating 
materials and equipment used to per- 
form the blood sugar screenings. 

Nursing students performed blood 



Feb. 7, according to information com- 
piled by Melissa J. Phillips, secretary to 
the coordinator of the coordinator of 
the practical nursing program at the 
College. 

On Tuesday, Feb. 3, the students 
performed blood sugar, blood 
pressure, and vision screenings in the 
Learning Resources Center, 

Seventy-one persons were tested 



Piercy here Wednesday 



Marge Piercy, author and poet, 
will be featured at a book review/dinner 
this Wednesday. 

The SPOTLIGHT erroneously 
reported last week that the .eview/din- 
ner was to have been last week. Any 
inconvenience caused by that error is 
regretted. 

The book review will begin at 5 
p.m. in LeJeune Chef followed by a 
dinner at 5:45. There will be no charge 
for the book review, but reservations 
are required. 

A workshop Involving Miss 
Piercy's work will be held this Wednes- 
day, Feb. 1 8, at 2 p.m. In the Le Jeune 
Chef. 

The location of the workshop has 
been changed since an earlier an- 
nouncement. 

There is no charge for the 
workshop, but reservations are re- 
quested. 



A reading and commentary on 
Piercy's work is scheduled in the 
Academic Center Auditorium, next 
Wednesday, Feb. 18, at 7 p.m. Admis- 
sion is free for students, faculty, and 
staff with a valid College ID. Those 
without IDs, the cost is $2, covering the 
cost of the author party. 

After the reading and commen- 
tary, an author party will be held at the 
College Bookstore, LRC. Miss Piercy's 
latest book will be available for pur- 
chase. 

Miss Piercy's visit is being spon- 
sored by the Women's Series. 

The Women's Series is sponsored 
by the College, the Women's Forum, 
The Multicultural Society, The 
Bookstore, the Williamsport YWCA, 
and B&S Picture Frames. This series is 
also being supported by a grant from 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
Council on the Arts and the 
Williamsport Foundation, 



pressure screenings at the Community 
Health Fest '87 at the Bethune- 
Douglass Community Center on Thurs- 
day, Feb. 5. 

Students who participated in the 
event are: 

- Karen M. Ambs, of Dushore. 

- Lisa M, Beaver, of South 
Williamsport. 

-Wendy L. Dixon, of Mon- 
toursvllle. 

-David 8 George, o1 
Williamsport. 

- Penny J. Hetzel, of Mill Hall. 

- Marlene J. Mitchell, of 
Castanea. 

- Pamela J. Baylor, of Lock 



Haven. 

- Patti Jo Schon, of Loyalsock. 

- Mary E. Segraves, of 
Williamsport. 

- Kristin B. Zierie, of Liberty. 

Mrs. Margaret L. McKeehen, pro- 
fessor of practical nursing, and Mrs. 
Ruth N. Nice, instructor of practical 
nursing, are their instructors. 

The Community Health Fest was 
sponsored by radio station WFXX, the 
American Heart Association, Divine 
Providence Hospital, Bethune- 
Douglass Community Center, the 
Williamsport Hospital and Medical 
Center, and the College's practical nur- 
sing department. 



Student groups' budgets 

Continued from page 1 

Recreation Center as soon as possible, she said. 

Requests for money must be accompanied by a 1986-1987 Request 
Form and a 1 986-1 987 College Activities Report and Evaluation. These forms 
are available by request from Ms. Cobb in the Recreation Center, or by calling 
College Ext. 4763. 

NEED A RIDE? GOLF CLUBS FOR SALE 

Students who need rides: Adver- irons, bag. Call 323-3988 after 6 p.m. 
tise In The SPOTLIGHT! for description and to discuss price. 




5ft"rtJRO« 



SPONSORED 



B = OO p> - m - 
TTTISH RITE ftLID I "TOFS 



^MSF=»OF*T A 
ILABLE: COLLEGE 



BoSPOTLIOHTDMonday, Feb. 16, 1987 



Eight receive Wheel Inn scholarships 



Six nursery management students and two 
forest technology students have been awarded 
the 1 986-1 987 Wheel Inn Scholarships, according 
to Donald S, Shade, financial aid director. 

Shade said consideration for the scholarships 
was given to students from Lycoming. Bradford, 
Tioga, and Sullivan Counties who are enrolled in 
agriculture-related programs and have attended 
the College at least one semester. 

Students with the highest grade point 
averages - all above 3.0 - were selected as reci- 
pients. Each student will receive an award of 
$1,000, 

The nursery management students who 



received scholarships are: 

- Todd N, Bacon, of Towanda. 

- Francis A. Berns, of Montoursville. 

- Gary R. Brungard, of Williamsport. 

- Linda K, Dietz, of Waterville. 

- Susan M. Grieco, of Williamsport, 

- Erica J, Silberbauer, of Athens. 
The forest technology students are: 

- Andrea L. Campbell, of Williamsport. 

- Timothy S. lulurphy, of Montgomery. 

This is the fourth year in which the Wheel Inn 
has contributed $8,000 for scholarships at the Col- 
lege, bringing the four-year contribution to 
$32,000. 



PBL to hold 
special session 
tomorrow 

Phi Beta Lambda will hold a 
special meeting at 330 p.m. tomorrow 
in Room 329, Academic Center, accor- 
ding to Paul W. Goldfeder, faculty ad- 
viser 

All members are being requested 
to attend, Goldfeder said. 

PBL members who intend to go to 
the State Leadership Conference in 
State College on (ularch 27, 28, and 29, 
the adviser said, must have their ap- 
plications in to him by next Saturday, 
Feb. 28. 

Questions about categories of 
competition may be directed to him, he 
said, to to Martin T. Green, PBL presi- 
dent. 

A drawing was to be held this past 
Friday for a Valentine box of candy 
The winner's name was scheduled to 
be posted on the PBL office door. 
Room 3, basement. Academic Center 



Scholarship applications 
available: deadline April 1 

Applications for the 1 987-88 Scholarship Program at the College now are 
available to students planning to return next fall, according to Donald S. Shade, 
director of financial aid. 

Shade said up to 20 awards of $500 each will be made to returning 
students on the basis of academic achievement and other criteria. Applicants 
must complete the application form and submit at least two letters of recom- 
mendation. 

The deadline for applications and letters of support is Wednesday, April 1 , 
1987. There will be no exceptions, according to Shade. 

Applications are available in each division office, in the Learning 
Resources Center, and the Financial Aid Office. 

Anyone with questions about the scholarship program may contact the 
Financial Aid Office In Room 201 of the Academic Center or call Ext. 4766. 

Bowlers mark high scores 



students of the College are taking 
part in a Tuesday afternoon bowling 
league at the ABC Lanes. Play begins 
at 4:30 p.m. and usually ends by 5:30. 

"The mixed doubles league is still 
forming," commented Max E. 
Reamsnyder, owner and manager. 

Couples and individuals, men and 






JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
^=Jx^r:>^? PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

DAILY SPECIALS 

Hours: Mon.-Sil. II i.m. lo 9 p.m. Closed Sundiy 



Monday 


Regular Sub 


Whole 


$1 70 


Cosmo 


Tuesday 


Meatball 


Whole 


$1 85 


Cosmo 


Wednesday 


Turkey 


Whole 


$1 50 




Thursday 


Ham 


Whole 


$1 90 




Friday 
Saturday 


Tuna 
Cheese Sleak 


Whole 
Whole 


$1 80 
$2 50 


Cosmo 
Cosmo 



•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" 

$4 20 WHOLE $2.10 HALF 



women are needed, he said. 

High scores reported as of last 
week are: 

High individual series, Donald 
Balliet, 575. 

Second high individual series. 
Rich Dalton, 541 . 

High team series. Speck & Sum- 
mers, 959. 

Second high team series. Cook & 
Yanni, 873. 

High individual single, Donald 
Balliet, 233. 

Second high individual single, 
Brian Speck, 197. 

High team single. Speck & Sum- 
mers, 364 

Second high team single. Cook & 
Yanni, 310. 



Female version 
of 'Odd Couple' 
next week 

The Williamsport Players will pre- 
sent the first local performance of the 
female version of "The Odd Couple" 
on next Friday, Feb. 27 and next Satur- 
day, Feb. 28, at the Williamsport Area 
Community College, according to Ms. 
JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coordinator of Col- 
lege activities. 

Performances begin at 8 p.m. in 
the College's Academic Center 
Auditorium. 

Neil Simon, the playwright who 
wrote the original play, rewrote the 
roles of Oscar and Felix into female 
roles, now Olive and Florence. 

The roles of Olive and Florence In 
the production will be two real-life 
roommates, Kalyn Shaible and Carol 
Boyer. The two have been "best 
friends since high school" and began 
sharing an apartment last August. 
They claim their experiences are "very 
similar" to the characters on stage. 

Carol (Olive) says of Kalyn 
(Florence), "She fits Florence to a T 
-but she's not as obnoxious!" 

Kalyn quips, "I've been dying to 
play Felix Unger all my life". 

Carol "wasn't expecting to get a 
lead, I was pleasantly surprised." 

The women share the opinion that 
the female version of the play is as 
entertaining as the original. They said 
Simon reworked the play to make it 
sensitive to its female characterization. 
For example, the guys' poker night in 
the original has become an evening of 
Trivial Pursuit. 

Kalyn explains, "These are peo- 
ple. It doesn't matter if they're men or 
women." 

Jerry Beardsley directs "The Odd 
Couple" cast of six women and two 
men. The cast includes Jan Meland, 
Janet M. Stroble, Mary Quinn Eleanr 
A. Horton, J. Patrick Arndt, and Fred B. 
Ames. 

Information about tickets is 
available by visiting the College Ac- 
tivities Office on the first floor of the 
Gym or by telephoning College Ext. 
4763. 



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SPOTLIQHTDMonday, Feb. 16, 1987d7 



G.E.D. Help available through Project ReEntry Foundation 



Project ReEntry is a program aim- 
ed at helping persons without a GE.D, 
or diploma, according to Ms- Nancy C. 
Beightol, coordinator for the program. 

Ms. Beightol said that anyone with 
30 earned college credits can get a 



Commonwealth Diploma by filling out a 
form and sending In a transcript copy. 
The cost Is $1 for the transcript. 

Persons who do not have a G.E.D. 
or high school diploma are not eligible 
for PHEAA grants. The Com- 



Civic Chorus welcomes singers 



The Wliliamsport Civic Chorus 
welcomes ail singers regardless of ex- 
penence, according to Ivls. JoAnn R. 
FremiottI, College activities coor- 
dinator. WCC especially needs male 
singers. 

Rehearsals are from 7;30 to 9;30 
p.m. on Mondays in St. John's United 
Methodist Church, 2101 Newberry St., 
Wllllamspon. 

Those interested In participating 
may contact Director Gary Renzelman 
IIIIIIIINIIIIIIUIIinilimiNIIIIIMMMMIMIMIMHIIIII 

ANY STUDENT INTERESTED 

in weight reduction program 

should see Janet Querlmit 



In the Gym, Room 104, 
Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 



at 1-769-6918, or President Marti 
Bryant at 323-9033 in the evening, Ms. 
FremiottI said. 

Rehearsals are underway for a 
concert of Mozart and Bach at 3 p.m. 
on Sunday, March 15. After that, 
rehearsals will begin for a concert of 
popular music by Leonard Bernstein, 
Stephen Sondhelm, and Jerome Kern 
at 8 p.m. on Monday, May 18. 



monwealth Diploma would remove this 
obstacle In applying for this financial 
aid, Ms. Beightol said. 

Anyone seeking help to get a 
G.E.D. may contact Ms. Beightol at 
Ext. 7450. Ms. Belghtol's office Is In 
Room 147 in the Automotive Trades 
Center. 

The Automotive Trades Center Is 
at the lower end of Susquehanna 
Street, opposite the newly completed 
Professional Development Center 

Also available are career counsel- 
ing and aid in finding a job for anyone 
without a diploma. The programs ser- 
vices are free to all students. 



Women's Agenda' lobbying 
for more aid programs 



The Women's Agenda, a coalition 
of over 100 women's organizations, 
met In Harrlsburg in late January to lob- 
by for "a bigger piece of the budget 
pie" for programs designed to aid 
women and children, according to Ms. 
Cherl Y. Hilton, coordinator of New 
Horizons. 

Attending the session were Ms. 



Single Parent Student? 

S.M.I.L.E. 

Single Miles In Life's Evolution 

Support Groups 

Begin 

Monday, Feb. 16 [Today] 

9 to 10 a.m. 

and/or 

11 a.m. to noon 

LEG Room B107 

Your Opportunity For: 

•Guidance 

(Support from Others in Similar Circumstances 

•Help with Tuition, Books, Childcare 

For more information, call... 
Cheri Hilton or Patty Gordon 
at Extension 7449 



Hilton; Ms. PattI Gordon, assistant for 
New Horizons: Ms. Nancy C. Beightol, 
coordinator of Project Re-entry, and 
Ms. Rosemary Neidig, director of 
domestic relations for Lycoming Coun- 
ty. 

The Women's Agenda hand- 
delivered more than 200 pies to 
legislators to symbolize that "the time 
has come for the poor to get a fair 
share of the budget pie," Ms. Hilton 
said. 

The Women's Agenda is lobbying 
for $410,000,000 to be earmarked for 
programs for Improving conditions for 
women and children. This Is, Ms. Hilton 
said, three percent of the total state 
budget. 

Ms. Hilton said that support is be- 
ing sought by getting Interested per- 
sons to write their area state represen- 
tatives. More Information, sample let- 
ters, and preprinted postcards are 
available from Ms. Hilton in the New 
Horizons office. Room 147, 
Automotive Trades Center, or by 
telephoning Ext. 7449 or Ext. 7450. 
JOIN A TEAM 

ABC Bowling Lanes Invites all 
Interested singles and couples to 
join the mixed doubles bowling 
league which Is still forming. Start 
time Is 4:30 Tuesday afternoons. 
More Information: Max Reamsnyder, 
326-2885. [advtj 



directors hold 
annual meeting 

College Information Office 

V. Jud Rogers, assistant vice 
president of Grit Publishing and Prin- 
ting Companies, was elected president 
of the board of directors of The 
Wliliamsport Area Community College 
Foundation Inc. during the board's re- 
cent annual meeting. 

Rogers succeeds Peyton D. 
McDonald, vice president and 
manager of E. F, Hutton and Company, 
as president. 

James E. Short, president of 
Jesco Athletics, and Charllne M. 
Waitman. president of Labels by PullzzI 
Inc., were re-elected to serve as vice 
president and secretary-treasurer, 
respectively, according to Ms. Ann 
Barilar, executive director of the Foun- 
dation. Ms. Bariiar was named ex- 
ecutive director in December. 

Four members of the board of 
directors were re-elected to three-year 
terms during the meeting. They are 
Alien E, Eriel, attorney; John B. 
McMurtrle, retired; John A. Savoy, 
president of Savoy and Son Inc., and 
James E. Short. 



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SoSPOTLIGHTOMonday, Feb. 16, 1987 



BULLETIN BOARD 

For week of Monday, Feb 16 through Sunday, Feb. 22 

MEETINGS 
SGA Executive... 3:30 p.m., this Thursday, Feb. 19, Room 
B107, LEG. 

SGA Senate... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 17, Room 
B107, LEG. 

Alpha Omega... 7 to 9 p.m, tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 
Room 133, AGG. 

Narcotics Anonymous... every Wednesday, 7 p.m.. Room 
B107, LEG. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... business meeting every Tuesday from 
noon to 1 p.m., Room 8107, LEG. 

Delta Phi Omega... 12:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 
Room 107, AGG. 

Service and Operation of Heavy Equipment Association... 6:30 
p.m., this Wednesday, Feb. 18, Room 221, AGG. 

Bloodmobile ... special meeting, 4 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 24, 
Room B107, LEG. 

SPOTLIGHT... 8 a.m. this Wednesday, Room 7, AGG. 
SALES, FUND-RAISERS 

Taco Sale... WWAS, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., today, Monday, Feb. 
16, AGG Lobby. Prices: one taco-75'; two tacos-$1.25; one taco 
and drink-$1 ; drink-35' 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Gity Bus... Students with validated ID may ride at reduced 
rates. Info from Gollege Activities Office, Gym. 

Swimming... W.A.C.C. students who are not members of the 
YMCA may use pool during certain hours; contact College Ac- 
tivities Office for up-to-minute listing on hours; $2 per person 
charge with W.A.G.G. ID. 

Movie Tickets... UA movie tickets now available in Gollege 
Bookstore, $2.75 each. (Gost increased by 25 cents by UA.) Spon- 
sored by SGA. 

Student Health Services... Room 104, Gym. Registered nurse 
on duty to treat minor illness and refer to physician or facility most 
capable of providing additional treatment. Hours are 8 a.m. to 3:30 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 

SPECIAL 

Steve Landesberg... Performing Artist Series, 8 p.m., this 
this Saturday, Feb. 21, Scottish Rite Auditorium. 

Lecture/Dlscusslon/Brown Bag Luncheon... sponsored by 
the Women's Forum, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., this Thursday, 
Feb. 19, Room 403, ACC. Local businesswoman Betsy Rider of 
Otto's Bookstore will speaic on "Booi(s as Helpers for 
Children". 

DANCES 

Dance... sponsored by the Carpentry Club, 8:30 to 1 1 :30 p.m. 
this Thursday, Feb. 19, Susquehanna Room. SHOCKWAVE wil 
deejay. Gost is $1 per person in street clothes, and 50' per person 
wearing beach clothes. 

Dance... sponsored by SGA, 8:30 to 1 1 :30 p.m., next Thurs- 
day, Feb. 26, Susquehanna Room, WFXX will deejay. Cost: 
$1 ,50 per person with College ID; $2 without. All proceeds go to 
Multiple Sclerosis Society. 



Cillo's 
College Corner 

PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Third St. 

(Next lo the Academic Center) 

HOURS* 

Moo. thm Thurj. 

7:30 i.m. lo 6 p.m. 

Fridi;, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 



LUNCH SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 

TURKEY SUB t...™. 

WHOLE $2.40 REG$2 70 

HALF $1.20 REG. $1.50 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 

AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 

BREAKFAST SPECIAmI 
THIS V^DEK J^« 

BACON * CHEESE • EGG SUB 

$1 50 



All vehicles must be moved 
for snow clearing: security chief 

Chief of Security Cecil Cryder has again issued a reminder that 
vehicles must be removed from College parl<ing lots in instances of snovK 
emergencies so the snow can be cleared away. 

Vehicles must be removed by 1 p.m. on weekdays and by 5 p.m. 
on Fridays and weekends to permit snow clearing. 

Violators, he said, will be lowed away and subject to paying towing 
costs as well as a $10 fine. 



Sports 

Action Activities 



Swimming... 

Students and staff of the College 
may swim at the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association for a reduced rate with 
presentation of a valid ID card. Hours 
are f^onday through Friday from 3 to 4 
p.m.; Ivlonday and Wednesday, 8:30 to 
9:30 p.m.; Friday, 7:30 to 8:45 p.m.; 
Saturday, 1 to 5:45 p.m., and Sunday, 
noon to 4:45 p.m. 
Indoor Tennis... 

Indoor tennis is available at the 
West Branch Racquet Club at a reduc- 
ed rate for students with a valid ID 
card. The hours available are 9:30 to 
1 1 p.m. Monday through Friday at a 
cost of $3 per person. 
Indoor Soccer... 

The indoor soccer league meets 
every Wednesday night from 7 to 10 
p.m. Anyone who wishes to watch is 
welcome to do so. 
Ice Skating... 

Ice skating is available at the 



Williamsport Armory from 5 to 9 p.m. 
Monday through Thursday. Free with a 
valid ID. 
Table Tennis... 

Anyone who wishes to participate 
in the table tennis tournament may sign 
up in the Recreation Center. Date and 
time will be established after sign-ups 
are complete. 
Badminton... 

A badminton tournament will be 
held in the Recreation Center at the 
end of the month. All interested per- 
sons may still sign up in the Recreation 
Center. 
Basketball... 

Bloomsburg University is sending 
its best basketball players to W.A.C.C. 
The tournament will be held at the end 
of the month. Sign-up in the Recreation 
Center before this Thursday. Tryouts 
will be held after then. 
- Based on Information by Margot 
Bayer, evening activities assistant 



In Next Week's SPOTLIGHT 

Secretarial Students Get 

Practical Experience 




SPOTLIGHT 



.WACC ARCHIVES 



Monday, Feb. 23, 1987 • Vol. 22, No. 22 • 4 Pages 
Wllllamsport Area Community College • Wllllamsport, Pa. 17701 



Professional Development Center to be opened 



SGA members 
to attend 
conference 

Eight Student Government 
Association members will attend a 
Leadership Conference this Saturday, 
according to Kathy L. Cobb, College 
activities assistant. 

The conference will be held at 
Delaware Valley College, Doylestown. 
Those students attending are William 
J. Fritz, president, plumbing and 
heating student from Homer City; Lyn- 
nee K. Wasson, vice-president, 
business management student from 
Pine Grove Ivlills; Karen L. Campbell, 
senator, graphic arts student from 
Moscow; Brian J. Winters, senator, 
culinary arts students from Brookville; 
Susan K. Baumer, treasurer, culinary 
arts student from Hughesville; William 
C. Calvert, parlimentarian and student 
action officer, electrical technology 
student from Duncansville; Barry A, 
Rathmell, programming officer, elec- 
tronics technology student from North 
Bend; and Coreena M. Waltz, SGA. 
member, business management stu- 
dent from Westport. 

The conference will be an all day 
affair including a round table discus- 
sion and other workshops, said Ms. 
Cobb, who will also be attending. It is 
being sponsored by the Delaware 
Valley College student government 
association. 




SPRING came early as floriculture students held their lund-ralslng flower 
sale Feb. 1 3. At left Is Shelly M. Lowe, of Covington, and at right Is Anne M. 
Bogaczyk, of Blossburg. 

Student Recognition Banquet 
to be held in april 

The Ninth Annual Student Banquet will be held at 6 p.m., Wednesday, 
April 22 in the Susquehanna Room. 

The banquet is sponsored by the Student Government Association. 

According to Ivls. Kathy L. Cobb, SGA adviser, SGA is encouraging all 
faculty, APT staff and student organization advisers to recommend any stu- 
dent(s) he/she believes deserves recognition for scholarship, leadership, and 
service to the College community. 

All recommendations should be referred, in writing, by Friday, lularch 20, 
to Room A137. LEC. 




TAKIN' A TACO - Angela R. CroHut, word pro- 
cessing student from Wllllamsport, and Lisa A. 
Park, computer science student from Muncy 
-with backs to camera - stopped by to "taco 
down" at WWAS student-radio fund-raiser sale 



D. Sunderlln, broadcasting student from Cogan 
Station; Margie E. Flanagan, broadcasting stu- 
dent from Johnstown; James E. Mothersbaugh, 
broadcasting student from Muncy, and Donald 
R. Smith, general studies student from Altoona. 



last week. Behind the table are, fromleft, DaUd [SPOTLIGHT PHOTO] 



Culminating thousands of hours of 
students' "hands on experience in lear- 
ning", the College's Professional 
Development Center this week will 
begin to be used for public functions. 

A series of events are scheduled 
to mark the completion and opening of 
the building built by students in various 
trades programs at a spot which has 
become "mid-campus" on Susquehan- 
na Street. 

This Thursday, according to Dr. 
Miles Williams, dean of employee and 
community relations, there will be a 
preview for the press, starting at noon. 
A luncheon in Le Jeune Chef is includ- 
ed. 

On Saturday, from 4 to 7 p.m., all 
College employees have been invited 
to visit the facility. 

On Sunday, March 1 , the public is 
invited to lour the new building 

348 pounds lost, 
says college nurse 

The participants of the Weight 

Loss Program have lost a total 347.5 
pounds, according to Janet R. Quirmit, 
college nurse. That is equivalent to 
three small people — anyone you 
know missing? 



Breast cancer 
lecture (free) 
on March 4 

The Women's Health Center of 
The Wllllamsport Hospital & Medical 
Center will present a free lecture on 
breast cancer next Wednesday, March 
4 at 7:30 p.m. in the Medical Hall on 
the hospital campus. 

According to a news release by 
the hospital's Community Relations 
Department, Timothy J. Pagana, M.D., 
of North Central Surgical Associates 
will discuss the diagnosis, treatments 
and prognosis of breast cancer as well 
as personal risk calculations. A ques- 
tion and answer session will follow the 
lecture and medical personnel will be 
available to answer individual ques- 
tions. 

The program is tree and open to 
the public. Refreshments will be serv- 
ed. Information is available by 
telephoning The Women's Health 
Center at 321-3000. 

Nomination deadline 

Next Tuesday, March 10, Is the 
deadline for filing nominations for 
excellence In teaching awards. 
Form information Is available by call- 
ing Ext. 7305. 



2DSPOTLIGHTDMonday, Feb. 23, 1987 



Networks offer poor excuse 
for not airing condom ads 



OPINION/COMMENT 



Commentary 

By Rulh Ann Hlxson 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Recently, television networks 
have refused to show condom com- 
mercials. 

The networks, reluctant to show 
the commercials, are atraid the ads are 
too controversial. The networks think 
the controversy will cause advertisers 
not to advertise on the network, or that 
viewers won't watch the channel 
because they don't want to see con- 
dom commercials. 

Showing condom commercials on 
the networks may oftend some people. 
If they are offended, they should just 
turn to another channel until the com- 
mercial Is over. No one is forcing peo- 
ple to watch these commercials. 

Some networks may argue that 
they don't show the commercials 
because they think the commercials 
will encourage teenage viewers to go 
out and have sex. I don't think this is 
true, lulany young viewers are sexually 
active and don't know what forms of 
birth control are available to them. By 
showing these commercials, young 
viewers can find out about this form of 
birth control. 

AIDS (acquired immune deficien- 
cy syndrome) is so widespread that 
federal health officials recommended 
the use of condoms to prevent the 



transmission of AIDS. Condoms are 
also very effective in preventing the 
spread of venereal disease. These two 
factors are enough reason why net- 
works should air condom commer- 
cials. 

If condom commercials were 
aired, and people paid attention to 
them, just think how many cases of 
AIDS and venereal disease could be 
prevented. Think also how many un- 
wanted pregnancies could be avoided. 

Can't the networks understand 
that the condom ads would be 
beneficial to stop the spread of disease 
and to promote the health of almost 
everyone? 

It Is the poorest reason I have 
heard for television networks not airing 
these commercials: because they're 
afraid of offending people. I would 
rather risk offending a few people than 
willingly let hundreds of thousands of 
people contact AIDS or venereal 
disease. 

I think the networks should stop 
being so concerned with ratings and 
how much money they can make. 
They should, instead, focus on bring- 
ing these commercials to the viewers 
as a tremendous public service. 

Losing a few viewers and adver- 
tisers to perform a service to mankind 
is a small price for a network to pay. 



Single Parent Student? 

S.M.LL.E. 

Single Miles In Life's Evolution 

Support Groups 

Begin 

Monday, Feb. 16 

9 to 10 a.m. 

and/or 

11 a.m. to noon 

LEG Room B107 

Your Opportunity For: 

•Guidance 

•Support from Others in Similar Circumstances 

•Help with Tuition, Books, ChUdcare 

For more information, call... 
Cheri Hilton or Patty Gordon 
at Extension 7449 



Smokeless tobacco: less danger 
than cigarettes? Think again! 

Commentary 

By Cathy Hannon 

Of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

Have you ever leaned over a foun- 
tain to get a drink and there was a gob 
of someone's discarded snuff? I have. 
Right here on campus. Repulsive is a 
mild word for the feeling you get. 

We've all seen the spots on the 
sidewalk caused by spitting. While this 
is socially repugnant, it is also highly 
unsanitary. 

But the reasons for not smoking 
go far beyond social and hygiene pro- 
blems. There are serious health pro- 
blems for the persons who use 
smokeless tobacco. 

There are non<ancerous pro- 
blems such as stained teeth, ground 
down teeth, ginivltis (infiamation of the 
gums), decayed teeth (because tobac- 



co tastes unpleasant It is often flavored 
and sweetened), and a condition 
known as black hairy tounge. Use of 
smokeless has been linked to increas- 
ed incidence of stomach ulsers, heart 
attacks, and arteriosclerosis. 

Then there is CANCER! 
Smokeless tobacco causes many dif- 
ferent types of oral cancer, as well as 
cancer of the esophagus, cancer of the 
bladder, and cancer of the larnyx. 

Many users of smokeless tobacco 
seem to believe that it is less 
dangerous than smoking cigarettes. 
The truth is the blood level of nicotine 
In smokeless tobacco users is as high 
or higher than that of smokers. 

If you use smokeless tobacco- 
quit. If you don't use it— don't start. For 
your own sake. 

SPOTLIGHT workers deserve 
recognition and applause 

Commentary by Tony Clllo, faculty adviser 

A small group of students has continued to produce one of the College's 
most significant, visible products: The SPOTLIGHT. 

The goal... the objective... the aim... of The SPOTLIGHT is fundamentally 
twofold: To provide as realistic an atmosphere as possible in which students may 
learn about journalism, photography, and mass media, and to provide a means 
whereby information by and for students may be published. 

At this moment in time, there is a 
small group of students who have 
grasped an unusual opportunity - an 
opportunity to learn by doing! 

They have recognized the value of 
this practical experience to their future 
job objectives. They accept the 
wisdom of graduates who repeatedly 
come back to tell us how valuable the 
SPOTLIGHT experience was to them 
in their careers. 

These students are developing, 
growing, and learning; they are getting 
their money's worth - and then some. 

But, beyond that, they are doing 
an outstanding service for their fellow 
students and for the institution. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, Fab. 23, 1987 - Vol. 22, No. 22 

The SPOTLIGHT is published each Monday 
morning of the academic year, except (or Col- 
lege vacations, by mass communications and 
other Interested students ol The Wiiiiamsport 
Area Community College 

Office: Room 7, Academic Center, 1 005 W. 
Third St., Wiiiiamsport, Pa. 17701. Telephone: 
(7171 326-3761. Extension 7633. 



Response invited 

Reader response to the com- 
mentaries Which appear on this 
page are invited. 

Responses, in written form, 
should be delivered to The 
SPOTLIGHT office. Room 7. 
basement. Academic Center, 
before noon tomorrow. 

Books wanted 

The SPOTLIGHT is continuing to 
collect books to donate to the Lycom- 
ing Literacy Project. 

Books may be delivered to the 
student newspaper office in the base- 
ment of the Academic Center. Or, 
donors may call the SPOTLIGHT. 



Opinions expressed are those of the student 
newspaper or of those whose names accom- 
pany items Opinions do not reflect officlaJ opi- 
nion of the institution. 



LETTERS TO SPOTLIGHT READERS 
•nd NEWS REPORT CONTRIBUTIONS 

Letters to SPOTLIGHT readers and other 
contributions should be typed, double-spaced 
and may be hand-carried or sent to the 
SPOTLIGHT office in the Academic Center Let- 
ters and ail other material submitted for publica- 
tion will be reviewed by the newspaper stall and 
may be reiected with a statement as lo reason. 
All letters must be signed, signatures must be 
authenticated by a member ot the newspaper 
staff No letter wilt be published without the 
wnter's name. 



SPOTLIQHTD Monday, Fab. 23, iea7D« 







■■^ 


ACROSS " Morally low 14 Poet Robert 


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6 Fernando 47 Town near Naples 22 Kitchen appliance ^B 


11 












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11 Type of vacuum 50 Rocky pinnacle 24 Place for storino 
tube SI Runs of luck water 

12 Prevents 53 Airline company 26 Devastate 

14 French cheese 55 Seat for two or 27 Left-over ctjn- 

15 Real estate incomes more coctton 

17 Part of the sleep 56 Weapons 29 Ending for youna or 
cycle 57 Portals old 

18 Cardinal 58 Sorrow 30 Understands 

20 Encountered 32 Banking term 

21 Leave out ^q^ 33 Destinies 

23 Former bo«ing name "" 34 Half of a balance 


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25 Not good nor bad 2 Word before fire 35 Took the leading 

26 Defeat 3 Jungle noise role 

27 Depend 4 Advantage 37 Restaurant em- 

28 Cherish 5 Farmer's purchase ployees 

30 Overcome with fumes (2 wds.) 38 Thespians 

31 Most like Jack 6 Lasso 39 Long for 
Benny 7 Comedian 41 Tickets 

33 Attach firmly Schreiber 44 Actress Carroll 

36 En route (3 wds.) 8 Fix 47 Roman statesman 

40 Fall flower 9 College major 48 deck 

41 Kitchen utensils 10 Flower parts 49 On the Adriatic 

42 Regatta 11 Vibration 52 WWII initials 


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Cathy's Diner 

1170 W. 4th SI. -k WOliamsport, Pi. 17701 • Phone 323-3224 


©Edward Julius Collegiate CW84-13 

Puzzle answer on page 4 





'Cultural Differences' to be topic 
this week in afternoon series 



Job Ops 



Teaching Adults In the Communi- 
ty College, an afternoon series, In- 
cludes this Thursday, according to Dr. 
Cynthia N. Schloss, coordinator of staff 
and program development. 

According to Dr, Schloss, the 
presentation Is In the Lifelong Educa- 



tion Center, in Room A1 21 , from 3:30 
to 5 p.m. 

Thursday's topic will be "Cultural 
Differences" and the speaker will be 
Dr. Terrell Jones, associate director, 
division of campus life, at the Penn- 
sylvania Stale University. 



Engineers scholarship offered 

Information about $1 ,000 Society for Ivlanufacluring Engineers Founda- 
tion Scholarships is available In the College's Financial Aid Office In the 
Academic Center. 

The scholarships viiW be awarded for the Fall Semester, according to an 
announcement from Donald S. Shade, director of financial aid. 

The deadline for applications is March 1 . 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

\^l^0ne Block from W.A.C.C. 
DAILY SPECIALS 

Hoars: Mon.-Sal. 11 a.m. lo 9 p.m. Closed Sunday 



ml 



Monday 


Regular Sub 


Whole 


$1.70 


Cosmo 


$2.10 


Tuesday 


Meatball 


Whole 


$1.85 


Cosmo 


$2.30 


Wednesday 


Turkey 


Whole 


$1 50 


Cosmo 


$1.95 


Thursday 


Ham 


Whole 


$1,90 


Cosmo 


$2.35 


Friday 


Tuna 


Whole 


$1.80 


Cosmo 


$2.25 


Saturday 


Cheese Sieak 


Whole 


$2,50 


Cosmo 


$2.95 



•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" 

$4.20 WHOLE $2.10 HALF 



NURSERY MANAGEMENT - Narbar 
Brothers Agway, 1400 W. College 
Ave., State College, PA 16801 has an 
opening for a landscape foreman. Call 
Donald Narbar at (81 4) 237-761 2 tor 
more information. 

POWER EQUIPMENT - Brickman In- 
dustries, Inc., 375 S. Flowers Mill Rd., 
Langhorne, PA 1 9047 has an opening 
for an outdoor power equipment 
graduate for full-time year-round work 
servicing backpack leaf blowers, lawn 
mowers, snow blowers ect. 40 hours 
week, benefits. Send a resume to Kelly 
Schultz, or call her at (21 5) 757-9400 
for more Information. 
RETAIL MANAGEMENT - Foot 
Locker, Susquehanna Valley Mall, 
Sellnsgrove, PA 17870, would like 
resumes from business management 
and retail management graduates sent 
to Lee Blackway, Manager, or stop by 
by and talk with him sometime other 
than Friday evening or Saturday. 
ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY — 
Loranger International, 817 Fourth 
Ave., Warren, PA 16365, will have an 
opening In the spring for either an elec- 
tronics technology or a business 
management graduate for sales on the 
West Coast. 25% of time would be 



spent on the West Coast, 75% in 
house. They manufacture sockets, 
printed curcult boards, ect. Will traifl. 
Send a resume to Ann Ferguson, Per- 
sonnal Director. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING - Schnabel 
Engineering Associates. 4909 Cordell 
Ave., Bethesda, MD 2081 4, has sent 
job descriptions and applications to the 
Advisement Center for civil engineer- 
ing technology graduates. 
COMPUTER SERVICES — Indiana Co. 
Area Vocational Technical School, 441 
Hamlll Rd., Indiana, PA 15701, will 
have- an opening for a full-time com- 
puter servicing technology Instructor In 
Sept. '87. Must be Pa. Certified or 
sucessfully completed the occupation 
Assessment Test and have a solid 
electronics background. Send a copy 
of your certification or competency test 
approval along with your resume and 
ACT 34 Clearance to William H. 
Rupell, Administrative Director no later 
than Feb. 27. 

PART-TIME/FULL-TIME - Full or part- 
time person who is interested in retail 
sales, must be neat and personable. 
Apply in person to Gllcks, 337 Pine 
Street (down town mail). 



p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ m 

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4oSPOTUQHTaMonday, Fab. 23, 1B87 



BULLETIN BOARD 



For week of Monday, Feb. 23 through Sunday. March 2 



MEETINQS 

SGA Executive... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow. Tuesday, Feb. 24, Room B107. LEC. 
Alpha Omega... 7 to 9 p.m, tomorrow. Tuesday, Feb. 24, Room 133. ACC. 
Narcotics Anonymous... every Wednesday, 7 p.m.. Room B107, LEC. 
Gamma Epsllon Tau. business meeting every Tuesday from noon to 1 
p.m.. Room B107, LEC 

Delta Ptil Omega... 3 p.m., tomorrow. Tuesday, Feb. 24, Room 103, ACC. 
Bloodmoblle... special meeting, 4 p.m.. Tomorrow, Feb. 24, Room B107, 
LEC. 

SALES, FUNDRAISERS 
Bake Sale... Human Servlcesd Club, 8 a.m. until everything is sold, this 
Wednesday, Feb. 25, ACC lobby. 

Daftodll Sale. SGA will take orders trom all campus offices during the 
month of March. Extra flowers will be sold from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday, March 
27, ACC lobby Daflodlls are $3 per bunch. All proceeds will benefit the 
American Cancer Society. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
The Rec Center will close at noon, Wednesday, Feb. 25 and re-open Thurs- 
day, Feb. 26 at 7:30 a.m. 

City Bus... Students with validated ID may ride at reduced rates. Info from 
College Activities Office, Gym. 

Swimming... W.A.C.C. students who are not members of the YMCA may 
use pool during certain hours; contact College Activities Office tor up-to-minute 
listing on hours; $2 per person charge with W.A.C.C. ID. 

li^ovle Tickets... UA movie tickets now available in College Bookstore, $2.75 
each. (Cost Increased by 25 cents by UA.) Sponsored by SGA. 

Student Health Services... Room 104, Gym. Registered nurse on duty to 
treat minor Illness and refer to physician or facility most capable of providing ad- 
ditional treatment. Hours are 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., l\/londay through Friday. 
ACTIVITIES 
Dance... sponsored by SGA, 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 26, Sus- 
quehanna Room, WFXX will deejay. Cost: $1 .50 per person with College ID; $2 
without. All proceeds go to l^lultiple Sclerosis Society. 

Film... sponsored by the Film Society, 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., Thursday, Inarch 
1 2 and Friday, March 1 3, ACC Auditorium. WACO students get In free with ID, 
public prices vary. The film scheduled is "28 Up," 



The Philadelphia Theatre Caravan 
will present "We've Stories to Tell... of 
(Africa" as part of the Children's Series 
on next Saturday, Feb. 28, according 
to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremlotti, coordinator 



of College activities. Showings will be 
at 2 p.m. at the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association (YWCA), Williamsport 
and at 7 p.m. on the North Campus, 
Wellsboro. 



Cillo's 
College Comer 

PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Tbird St. 

(Neil to Ihe Acidemic Ceoler) 

HOURS* 

Mon. thrn Than. 

7:30 i.m. lo ( p.m. 

Friday, 7:30 i.m. lo 4 p.m. 



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Monday thru Friday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 
Saturday 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

Proliulonal packaging and ahlpping ol your malariala In minutaa. 
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Film., sponsored by SGA, 8 p m.. Wednesday. March 1 1 , ACC Auditorium. 
Admission Is free to students with ID, $1 without. The film will be "House" (rated 
R). "House Is a horror/comedy story staring William Katt. 

"We've Stories To Tell of Afhca ..."... sponsored by the Children's Series, by 
the Philadelphia Theater Caravan, 2 p.m. showing at the Williamsport YWCA and 
a 7 p.m. showing at WACC's North Campus, both on Saturday, Feb. 28. $2 for 
the performance; $5 for series tickets (includes 3 plays). 

"The Odd Couple" (female version)... performance by the Williamsport 
Players, all performances 8 to 1 p.m., this Friday and Saturday, Feb. 27 and 28, 
and next Friday and Saturday, March 6 and 7, ACC Auditorium. Tickets are $5. 
Maya Angelou... 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 24, ACC Auditorium. She will 
deliver a reading/lecture. The reading Is "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". 
Tickets are $2 and available in the Gym, Room 108. 

Leadership Conference... this Saturday, Feb. 28, Delaware Valley College, 
Doylestown, PA. SGA members will participate. 

The Wlillamsport Civic Chorus... presented by the Local Artist Series, 8 to 1 
p.m., Monday, May 18, ACC Auditorium. Ticket price has not been determined. 
Lock Haven University Symphony... 8 p.m., Monday, March 23, ACC 
Auditorium. Sponsored by the Local Artist Series. Admission is free. 

10th Annual Bluegrass Festival... 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 7, Susquehanna 
Room. Free to WACC students and staff with ID. No advance ticket sales, pay at 
the door. 

BUS TRIPS 
New York City... Saturday, March 28, the bus leaves the College at 6 a.m. 
and returns leaving NYC at 9 p.m. Transportation costs are $20 for WACC 
students, faculty/staff, and alumni; $22 for the general public. Deadline for reser- 
vations is Monday, March 16. 

Washington D.C.... Saturday, April 11, the bus leaves the College at 6 a.m. 
and returns leaving Washington D.C. at 9 p.m. Transportation costs are $20 (or 
WACC students, faculty/staff, and alumni; $22 for the general public. Deadline for 
reservations is Friday. March 27. 

For more Info and reservations call 327-4763. Seats are confirmed upon 
payment and money is not refundable. The College is not responsible for proper- 
ty theft and damage or injury which may occur. 



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Some ruin everyone's fun: Let's hope for self-control 



Commentary 

By Lynnee K. Wasson 

SGA president 

On Thursday, Feb 1 9. there was a 
dance in the Cafeteria The dance 
seemed to go well - up until around 1 1 
p.m., when someone had to ruin it lor 
everyone else. There was damage 
done in one o( the restrooms. 



The Student Government 
Association was very disappointed 
when it heard about this. We hope that 
this person or persons realize that 
whatever damage was done may have 
to be paid for out of the students' ac- 
tivities budget. This is the money that 
SGA uses to purchase movies, spon- 
sor dances, and other student 



aciiivites. 

This incident may also have an in- 
fluence on whether there will be any 
dances in the future. 

It is a shame that one or a few 
students can ruin something for the 
rest of the student body. 

Let us hope that at future events 
students will learn to control 
themselves. 



Landesberg gives 'jocular performance' 



By Jeff Campanaill 
Of The SPOTLIQHT Staff 

Steve Landesberg, the quintessential quipster of cerebral comedy, fresh 
on the college circuit again after a brief hiatus, gave Williamsport a jocular per- 
formance Saturday night. 

Landesberg is happy to be back on the road again. "But," he explains, " I 
don't know what the material I prepare for each tour will do until I get It out 
there in front of the audience. Each night I do a little editing; take out the stuff 
that got little response and expand on the stuff that got good response. I kind of 
massage it until I think it's right. They seemed to like the condom material out 
there tonight. Who knows? I might work it in the next time I'm on the Tonight 
show. 

The present controversy about whether or not television will air condom 
advertisements provided the source of many of Landesberg's biggest laughs, 
a theme that recurred throughout the evening to the relentless delightment of 
an unabashed audience. Landesberg performed for just over an hour, roaming 
the stage, sipping from a never ending glass of ice water, and wreaking 
general comedic hysteria upon the minds of the nearly 780 people that attend- 
ed the show. 

The crowd was pre-heated by Landesberg's warm-up man. New York Ci- 
ty comic Mike Reynolds. His spirited, fractious, quickpaced banter well offset 
fhffCTjnsi^erably more adagio pace of Landesberg's humor. The pair provided 
an enjoyable evening that the audience will no doubt remember for some good 
time. 

Having had the opportunity to speak with Landesberg after the perfor- 
mance, I was enlightened to a completely different side of the man than that 
which I had just witnessed-hls serious side. 

Landesberg.the proud father of a five-week-old baby girl, Is eager to set- 
tle down now. "After this lour schedule I'll probably gel into something that will 



let me spend more time with my family." His wife is also involved in television, 
she Is a producer of commercials. K^aybe they will work together on projects in 
the future, maybe not, but whatever it is, it will probably have something to do 
with television. 

Best known for his portrayal of Sgt. Dietrich on Barney Miller, Landesberg 
played on the show from 1 976 until the show ended in 1 982. In the series Sgt. 
Dietrich stated that he had given up his pursuit of psychology to become a 
cop. When queried about this unlikely career turn, Landesberg said, " Yes, 
Sgt. Dietrich did give that impression... however, Sgt Dietrich also lied a lot to 
serve his own purposes." 

How hard was it for Landesberg to portray the character of Sgt. Dietrich? 
"Not very," he said, "The disposition of Sgt. Dietrich isn't really that different 
than my own. I had to kind of grow into his character in certain respects, but it 
wasn't hard because most of me was already that character." 

What does Landesberg miss most about Barney Miller? " The money! " 

Landesberg occasionally sees some of the old Barney Miller gang when 
he visits the west coast, but is mostly keeping busy in the East and in Canada 
now. 

Offers to play the lead role in a number of television sit-coms were turned 
down by Landesberg because he felt the material was bad. Bad in what way? 
"Just not the kind of material that was right for me." Which sit-coms? "No, I 
won't say." However, he did say that some of the sit-coms now enjoy a 
"popular" status. 

Landesberg verified that he has just finished working on a film in which he 
plays a down-and-out musician. Landesberg will be in New York City to start 
editing on the film shortly. "But I don't know when it will be released." Does 
Landesberg himself play an Instrument? "In the film I play the drums; guitar; 
piano; horns.. .well they're dubbed really. Do I play an instrument myself? No." 

Asked if he had a tip for the struggling, frustrated, up-and<oming comic, 
Landesberg said, "A tip? Sure... Don't run with your hands in your pockets!" 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday, March 2, 1917 - Vol. 22, No. 23 

The SPOTLIGHT (9 published each Monday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept for College vacations, by interested students of The Williamsporl Area Com- 
munity College. 

Office; Room 7. Academic Center, 1005 W. Third St., Williamsport Pa 
1 7701 Telephone; (71 7| 3263761, Extension 7633. 



Opinions expressed are those of the student newspaper or of those whose 
names accompany items. Opinions do not reliect official opinion of the Institution 



LETTERS TO SPOTLIQHT READERS 
and OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS 

Letters to SPOTLIGHT readers and other contributions should be typed, 
double-spaced and may be hand-carried or sent to the SPOTLIGHT office in the 
II be reviewed by the newspaper staff and may be re- 
, AN material, Including letters, must be signed. 



Academic Center Letters v 

Jected with a statement as ti ^ 

signatures must be authenticated by a member oi the newspaper staff. No letter will 



be published without the writer's 



STAFF 

Brenda M. VIbert • Managing Editor 

Donna M, Trimble • Photography Editor 

Michael Waldron • Business/Advertising Manager 

Catherine A. Hannon • Senior Staff Writer 

Ruth Ann Hlxson • Senior Stall Writer 

James Treeae • Contributing Compositor 

Margaret Flanagan • StaM Writer 

James Doan • stall Artist 

Diane Shaheen • Advertising Production 

Jell Campanelll • Business/Advertising Slatl 

Mark Montecalvo * Associate Compositor 



SINGLE PARENT STUDENTS 
...interested in May ternn classes: 
New Horizons has funds available 



Correction 

In last week's issue of The 
SPOTLIGHT, the bylines on two com- 
mentaries were reversed. Correctly: 
The commentary about smokeless 
tobacoo was written by Ruth Ann Hix- 
son and the commentary about televi- 
sion advertising of condoms was writ- 
ten by Cathy Hannon. 



Down with dinner....? 



The Weight Loss Program 
has lost 397y< pounds to date. 
We would like "The Glory Boys" 
to note that this is a weight loss, 
not gain, program. 

Just remember: "If you wish 
to grow thinner: You must 
diminish dinner." 



ACC elevator 

for handicapped 

says director 

The elevator in the Academic 
Center is for the use of students with 
handicaps and for College staff, accor- 
ding to Lawrence W. Emery, director of 
advisement and career services. 

He said he is reminding other 
students that using the elevator may 
deprive a handicapped student of the 
only way to get to his or her class. 

Emery said student cooperation in 
this matter would be appreciated. He 
added: Any questions about the use of 
the elevator may be referred to him In 
the Advisement and Career Services 
Center, Room 157, Learning 
Resources Center. 



to help with tuition and books. 

Notify us as soon as possible 

at College Extension 7449, 



SPOTLIGHTDMoidiy, Mirch 2, IMTdJ 




PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER - The atrium Is situated just off PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER - The main meeting room Is nam- 
tf)e main meeting room. Colncidentaly, the company which won the bid to do 8<1 The Mountain Laurel Room. Featured Is adjustable lighting to help set 
the room is owned by former W^.C.C. students. various moods. The stone fireplace was constructed by students of the Col- 

lege. 

Secretarial students get practical experience 



By Ruth Ann Hixson 
SPOTLIGHT Senior Staff Writer 

Secretariai professional internship 
and experiential learning programs 
give students in the secretarial courses 
opportunities to gain practical ex- 
perience by worl<ing in real offices, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Bonnie R. Taylor, 
associate professor of business. 

Mrs. Taylor supervises both pro- 
grams which place students in area of- 
^fices. Dr. David Heiney, education 
director at Williamsport Hospital and 
former dean and acting president of the 
College vworks with Mrs. Taylor in plac- 
ing students in jobs at the hospital. Ms. 
Ann Garrett, personnel director at 
Lycoming County Court House also 

Testing 

is week's topic 

Teaching Adults in the Communi- 
ty College, an afternoon series, will in- 
clude a presentation this Thursday, ac- 
cording to Dr. Cynthia N. Schloss, 
coordinator of staff and program 
development. 

Dr. Schloss said the presentation 
will be held from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in 
Room A1 21 in the Lifelong Education 
Center. 

The topic this week will be 
"Testing Strategies" and the speaker 
will be Dr. Edward Cory, of Ferris State 
College. 



asists in student placement, Mrs 
Taylor said. 

Each student enrolled in the 
secretarial program is given the opor- 
tunity to experience "live office situa- 
tions" through the office internship pro- 
gram. The students are placed in of- 
fices relevant to their curriculum, i.e. 

Legal secretarial students working 
at the Lycoming County Court House 
are Michelle R. Boob, of Mifflinburg, in 
the Public Defender's Office; Michelle 
C. ZIockie, of Kulpmont, in the District 
Magistrate's Office in the Court House, 
and Jody M. Smith, of Linden, in 
District Magistrate's Office, 
Williamsport. 

Executive secretarial students 
working on the College campus are 
Julie Y. Chambers, of Mifflinburg, in 
the Integrated Studies Division Office: 
Linda J. Grimes, of Williamsport, in the 
Word Processing Center; Lori A. Pear- 



son, of Montgomery, in Thomas Zim- 
merman's Office; Carol L. Searfoss, of 
South Williamsport, in Paul 
Petcavage's office, and Grace 8. 
Stebner, of Williamsport, in the College 
Communcations Office. 

"Over the years, students have 
worked in many kinds of offices all 
over the state and occasionally some 
out of state," Mrs. Taylor said, 
medical secretarial students at the 
hospital. The students are not paid for 
this work. 

This program is required of ail 
secretarial students. 

In addition, there are approximate- 
ly 1 5 students working off the campus 
in paid jobs in the experiential learning 
program. They earn College credits 
and may substitute the experiential 
learning for the internship, Mrs. Taylor 
said. 

Medical secretarial students cur- 



Dr. Wolfe is speaker tomorrow 
for College Colloquium Series 



rently working at the Williamsport 
Hospital in the internship program are 
Janice E. Appleton, of Towanda, and 
Michelle L. Shults. of New Albany, in 
Family Practice: Sara L. Adams, of 
Williamsport, in Women's Health 
Center, and Peggy M. Strassner,of 
Allenwood, in Personnel. 

Paula M. Weikel, a secretarial ad- 
ministration student from 
Allenwood, works in a veterin ari---;- 
office. 



Budget is topic 
at tonight's 
board session 

The College's Board of Trustees 
will meet tonight, March 2, at 8 p.m. in 
the Boardroom of the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 

One of the main items on the 
agenda is the approval of the proposed 
1987-88 postsecondary operating and 
capital budget. 



A presentation in the College's 
Colloqium Series will be given tomor- 
row at 3:30 p.m. in Room 1 32 of the 
Academic Center, according to Dr. 
Daniel J. Doyle, director of the In- 
tegrated Studies Division. 

The presentation is entitled "The 
Desktop Publishing Revolution" - with 



a subtitle. "Sneeze and You've Missed Intpmritionfil 



■■■€■■■ ■■LiririH 
416 River Avenue 



If 

The speaker will be Dr. Robert W. 
Wolfe, assistant director of the In- 
tegrated Studies Division. 

Dr. Doyle noted that the same 
general topic will be discussed by Dr. 
Wolfe the following day, Wednesday, 
from 7 to 10 p.m. at Bucknell Universi- 
ty 

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Answar to What l> 117 



smorgasbord 
to be on campus 

The International Student Coor- 
dinating Committee of Lycoming Coun- 
ty (ISCALC) will hold its 1 8th annual In- 
ternational Smorgasbord here next 
Saturday, March 7. 

The event will be in the Sus- 
quehanna Room at 6:30 p.m. 

According to Kathryn A. Per- 
rence, ISCALC president, the organiza- 
tion ia a nonprofit group with two main 
functions The first is to sponsor an in- 
ternational student who could not 
otherwise afford a college education. 
The group also provides activities and 
support for exchange students who are 
living in Lycoming County, 

Donation for the smorgasbord is 
$12. Tickets may be obtained from: 
Joseph G. Sick, 1-546-5685, Janet 
Espenshade, 433-4261, and Otto's 
Book Store, 25 W. Fourth St., 
Williamsport. 



laSPOTLIGHTDMoDihy, March 2. 1987 



Distinquished 
Teaching A wards 
nominations deadline 
is eiglit days away 



The deadline for nominations for 
the Distinquished Teaching Awards is 
next Tuesday, March 10, according to 
Dr. Robert G. Bowers, executive assis- 
tant for internal affairs- 

Each year, one faculty member is 
chosen to receive the "(vlaster Teacher 
Award" and two other faculty 
members receive the "Excellence in 
Teaching Awards". 

The recipients of these awards are 
selected from nominations submitted 
by students, faculty, and staff of the 
College. Dr. Bowers noted 

Part-time faculty and first-year 
faculty are not eligible to be nominated. 
Any full-time faculty member who has 
completed one year of teaching is eligi- 
ble to receive the "Excellence in 
Teaching Award"and any faculty 
member who has taught six years is 
eligible for the "Master Teacher 
Award". 

Dr. Bowers said student nomina- 
utEDE aiB.yjriuch valued". He said the 
nominations are an opportunity for 
students to "give recognition to Instruc- 



GET hosts 
conference 

The College's unit of Gam- 
ma Epsllon Tau, graphic arts 
society, hosted a mini- 
conference In February. 

Members of Zeta Chapter 
from the Rochester Institute of 
Technology attended the con- 
ference. Various topics were 
discussed Including pledging, 
education. International con- 
stitution, publicity, and 
recruiting. 

After the business ses- 
sions, a dance was held at the 
Elks Lodge in downtown 
Wllllamsport. Music was by 
Shockwave. 



tors who have made a difference in 
their lives". 

Pick-up locations for Distinquished 
Teaching Awards booklets and 
nominations forms are: 

Switchboard/Information Center in 
Learning Resources Center; Financial 
Aid Office in Academic Center; Tutor- 
ing Center in LRC; Industrial 
Technologies Division office. Student 
Government Association Office in 
Lifelong Education Center, at North 
Campus, and at Dr. Bowers' office in 
the Lifelong Education Center. 

For students who would like to 
make a nomination but feel they lack 
precise writing skills, help is available 
in the Tutoring Center. Dr. Bowers 
pointed out. 

Recipients of the awards are 
selected from the nominations by a 
team including Dr. Bowers; Dr. James 
E. Middleton. dean of academic affairs; 
Lynnee K. Wasson. business manage- 
ment student from Pine Grove Mills 
and president of the Student Govern- 
tnenl Association, "and the fhr* most 
recent recipients of the Master Teacher 
Award who are Richard J. Weilminster. 
associate professor of horticulture; La- 
ment E. Butters, associate professor of 
civil technology, and Dr. Daniel J. 
Doyle, director of the Integrated 
Studies Division. 

Lock Haven 
Symphony 
here March 23 

The Lock Haven University Sym- 
phony will perform here on Monday. 
March 23 at 8 p.m. in the Academic 
Center Auditorium. 

The symphonic band, which is 
directed by Dr. Florentine J. Caimi. has 
toured Europe on several occasions, 
and plans are now underway for a tour 
of Scandinavia and Scotland. 

The concert is sponsored by the 
College's Local Artist series. Admis- 
sion is free. 



p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ h ■ i 

!h»e piziai 



I Buy any size Little Caesstfs 
■ Original round pizza at regular 
" price, get the identical pizza 
I FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 

GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 




W.A.C.C. ilndenb uie 
•ddidoul 10% onl; wllb 
■lidal I.D. ud Ibli id. 




BUT THEY HAD VEGGIES, TOO - Human Services Club members were out 
again with a bake sale to raise funds for the organization - but this time, 
they included bags of veggies. Here working at the sale table are Kim A. 
Phillips, of Wllllamsport, at left, Erma Peac>)y, of Jersey Shore, and Con- 
nie Bobbins of Wllllamsport. 



Job-Ops 



Information is supplied by Lawrence W. Emery, director of the Advise- 
ment and Career Center. Questions should be directed to that office which is in 
the Learning Resources Center. 



One coupon per customer. Cairy out only Al panicipallng localions h 



Orangeville Manufacturing, P.O. Box 215. Orangeville, Pa. 17859, would 
like resumes from fourth semester ED and TD students for a layout draftsper- 
son. Would be working with mechanical engineers and needs mechanical 
ability. Send a resume to Brian McCrossen. general manager. 

Bartlett Tree Experts, P. 0. Box 1 77. Exton, Pa. 1 9341 , has positions for 
forest technology graduates for positions on their production staff, pesticide 
appllcafors, IPM managers, and sales representatives. They also employ first- 
year students for summer interns. Send resumes or call Joseph C. Bones, 
safely and training coordinator. Mideast Division. 

Bargain Sheet. P.O. Box 278. Pleasant Gap. Pa. 16823. has an opening 
for a GA graduate for typesetting. Should have markup/specking skills. Send a 
resume or stop by 131 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. and fill out an applica- 
tion. 

Gannett Fleming Inc., Engineers and Planners. P. O. Box 1693, Har- 
risburg. Pa., 17105, has an opening for an engineering technician with two 
years experience assisting an engineer in performing geometry, profiles and 
grading, drainage and quantity computations. Send a brief resume referring to 
this announcement to Walter P. Buehler. personnel director. 

Eck-Elec Enterprises In;. RD 2. Box 165. Kempton, Pa. 19529. a small 
electrical contractor specializing in industrial and commercial work, would like 
resumes from EO and EL graduates from that general area sent to Charles H. 

Ferguson 
to be here 
March 1 4 

Maynard Ferguson is about to 
begin an electric winter/spring tour 
with his new band, High Voltage. 

Last summer Ferguson launched 
this new seven-piece fusion-oriented 
jazz band to critical acclaim. This 
year's tour started Jan. 22 and will run 
until June. 

Utilizing the latest in synthesized, 
electrified, and computerized wizardry. 
Ferguson will perform on Saturday. 
March 1 4. at 8 p.m. in the Scottish Rite 
Auditorium. 

Furguson will also be appearing 
next month on HBO in the release of 
the cable giant's latest Jazz special In- 
cluding such veteran performers as 
Dizzy Gillespie, Chuck Mangione, Al 
Hurt, and Herbie Hancock. The show 
was taped live at New Orleans' 
Storeyville Jazz Hall. 



Auditions open 
for nnusical 

The Williamsport Players will hold 
open auditions for "The Apple Tree", a 
musical about men and women. 

There are roles available tor five 
men and three women, plus the 
chorus. People auditioning should br- 
ing prepared music. 

Auditions will be held tomorrow 
and Thursday from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
in Room 221 of the Academic Center. 

The performances of "The Apple 
Tree" will be Saturday, May 9; Sunday. 
May 1 0; Friday. May 1 5; and Saturday, 
May 1 6. 

The musical is based on stories by 
Mark Twain, Frank Stockton, and Jules 
Feiffer. 

Music will be by Jerry Boch, lyrics 
by Sheldon Harnick, choreography by 
Bernadette Haas, music direction by 
Ann Marie Cerciello, and it will be 
directed by Deb Buckman. 



SPOTLIGHTDMondiy, Much 2, IW7a5 



Community College students go to work 



The locker rooms at 
Williamsport's Bowman Field are pro- 
viding a unique educational setting for 
some Williamsport Area Community 
College students. These students, 
enrolled In construction technology 
division programs at the College, are 
refurbishing the home and visiting 
locker rooms as part of the overall 
renovation of the field's facilities. 

About 50 students are involved In 
the project. Students from the architec- 
tural technology program, under 
associate professor Joseph G. Iwlark, 
prepared drawings for the remodeling. 
Electrical occupations students, led by 
Instructor Wayne E. Gebhart, are pro- 
viding the electrical work. 

Construction carpentry students In 
Instructor James E. Young's remodel- 
ing class, and building construction 
technology and constuction carpentry 
students In Young's practical construc- 
tion class are completing the refur- 
bishing. 

Fred W, Dochter Is the College's 
construction coordinator for the pro- 
ject. 

When the job Is finished, the 
students will have provided rough and 
finished carpentry and electrical work, 
resurfaced the wooden lockers, provid- 
ed finished ceilings and walls, and 
carpeted floors, according to Dr. Ralph 
A. Home, director of the the College's 
constructlcJrt technologies division. 

The students' work Is provided at 
no labor cost as part of their instruc- 
tional program at the college. The only 
cost Incurred is in materials. Or. Home 
explained. The scheduled date of com- 
pletion for the project is April 1 7. 

The College became involved In 
the Bowman Field renovation at the In- 
vitation of William Pickelner. Pickelner, 
a local businessman and strong sup- 
■lorter of basesall In the city, said he 
went to the College "because they had 
done such fantastic work on projects 
like this In the past ,,, and because we 
needed them." 

"These students are very gifted In- 
dividuals who give 100 percent to the 
job," Pickelner said. "I've been check- 
ing on them and they're doing a great 
job," he added. 




Working on refurbishing the locker rooms (top pholo)at Bowman Field are 
construction carpentry students Joseph F. Popson Jr., at left, of RIdgway, 
and Robert R. Roy Jr., of Lansdaie. 

Doing carpentry work in bottom photo are construction carpentry students, 
from left, David A.Ross, of Landenburg, and Brad A. Gorsline, of 
Wiiiiamsport. in background is Daniel L Burns, of Aitoona. 



CAMPUS RECRUITING 

Keystone Printed Specialities, Route 247, Jessup, Pa., 18434 will be 
recruiting graphic arts graduates on campus on l\/londay, March 23. Resumes 
will be collected in the Advisement Center until March 1 3 for interviews. Com- 
pany Information is also available in the Advisement Center. 

York Graphic Services, 3600 W, Ivlarket St., York, Pa. 1 7404, will speak 
with graphic arts students about opportunities at York Graphics and will ac- 
cept applications at 1 1 a.m. Wednesday, March 25. Those interested may sign 
up In the Advisement Center. 

Deadline for RIM and BM graduates to submit resumes to the Advise- 
ment Center for Interviews with Weis Markets for manager trainees Is next 
Thursday, March 12. 

PART— TIME EMPLOYMENT:STUDENTS 

A-Plus Mini Market , 507 Hepburn St., Wiiiiamsport, Pa. has part-time 
opening - 17 to 25 hours per week - for all three shifts. $3.50 an hour. 
Responsibilities Include cash register, stocking, and cleaning. Stop by Mini 
Market and fill out an application. 

Masonry student wanted to reset a stone wall; call Ruth Reese at 
322-6824. 



SUMMER INTERNSHIPS 

Common Cause offers college students the opportunity to come to 
Washington to participate actively in the political process. Unpaid internships 
are open for researchers, congressional monitors, press office aides. More In- 
formation available in the Advisement Center. 

Vegetation Control Service Inc. 2342 Main St., Athol, Mass, 01331 , has 
full-time and summer jobs available for forestry and nursery management 
students. Starting at $6.50. Send a resume to William E. Rose, Ph. D., super- 
visor. More information available in the Advisement Center. 

White Beauty View Resort, RD 2, Box 288C, Greentown, Pa. 1 8426 is of- 
fering an internship program for chef's assistants. Send a resume to the atten- 
tion of the personnel department. 




6aSPOTLIGHTaMonlt;. Mirel 2, IM7 




Library awarded 60-volume 
set of classic American literature 



A 60-volume set of The Library of 
America, the series that American 
Heritage magazine called "the most 
ambitious effort ever undertaken to put 
the best of American Literature into 
the hands of the general reader." 

The W.A.C.C. Library received 
the award last June after submitting an 
application to the Library of America 
and obtaining pledges from the An- 
drew/ W. Mellon Foundation and the 
W A.C.C. Foundation, Inc. The 
W.A.C.C. Library is one of only about 
one thousand across the country that 
are acquiring this important collection 
of American Literature 

The W.A.C.C. Library has receiv- 

AT LEFT 
Adding to the collection: 
Mrs. Ann M. Barllar, executive 
director of the W.A.C.C. Foun- 
dation, shows new boolt to Lee 
M. Burkhart, word processing 
student from Wllliamsport. 



ftll comini ttees are continuing researcti necessary to complete 
their agenda items. 

COLLEGE COUNCIL. Council approved a Student Election 
subcommittee consisting of Carl Christiansen, Marian 
Blackburn and Jeanette Fraser. It also approved the 
following new faculty and staff members of Governance. 



'" '""aLfflDiPtfiJ'^''mkte rcs 



-fwm ISSUES 



a: 3 

> m 

a ui 

a a. 



Adelle Dotzel replaces Richard Sweeney (elected) 
Donna Miller replaces (temporarily) Darla Brown 
(elected ) 

HUMAN RESOURCES - 

Roy Fontaine replaces (temporarily) Ben Eldred 
(elected) 

LONG RANGE PLAN - 

Kathy Marcel lo replaces Paul Petcavage (appointed). 

Three students have also been approved to join Governance: 

Erica Silberbauer is SGA representative to College 
Council replacing Kathy Cobb who is now a staff member. 

Michael Gary will serve on Long Range Plan replacing a 
student who has withdrawn from the College. 

Barbara Voss will serve on Student Affairs replacing 
Bill Fritz who will complete his program in March. 

Listed below are the dates and times of meetings scheduled 
for March. 



TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1987 

3S30 p.m. - Long Range Planning Committee 

3:30 p.m. - Academic Standards and Issues Committe 

3:30 p.m. - Human Resources Committee 

3:'»0 p.m. - Student Affairs Committee 

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 19B7 

3:30 p.m. - Curriculum Committee 

3:30 p.m. - Academic Standards and Issues Committe 

TUESDAY, MARCH ah, 1987 and MARCH 31, 1987 

3:'(5 p.m. - College Council 



ed the thirty volumes already published 
in the Library of America, over 40,000 
pages of the best writing our country 
has produced. The remaining thirty 
volumes will be sent in regular 
shipments over the next four years for 
an average total of seven volumes a 
year. Volumes already published in- 
clude the works of Henry Adams, 
James Fenimore Cooper, Stephen 
Crane, Ralph Waldo Emerson, William 
Faulkner, Washington Erving, Jack 
London, Herman Mellville, and Edgar 
Allen Poe, to name just a few. 

Kate Hickey, Director of the Learn- 
ing Resources Center, expressed 
pleasure in light of the recent acquisi- 
tion, stating that severe restrictions on 
the Library's book budget would not 
allow the purchase of this extremely 
desirable collection. 

The books are now on the shelves 
and are available to students, faculty, 
and the general W.A.C.C. community. 

Bowling scores 
tallied 

The Tuesday afternoon bowling 
league which meets at the ABC lanes, 
continued last Tuesday. The high 
scores were; 

High individual series, Todd Sum- 
mers, 583. 



iecono hlgirTriSIviJual series, 
Brian Speck, 519. 

High individual single, Todd Sum- 
mers, 21 6. 

Second high individual single, 
Brian Speck, 213. 

High team series. Team No. 4, 
Speck and Summers, 1102. 

Second high team series, Team 
No. 3, Cook and Yanni, 985. 

Men and women are still welcome 
to join the league. More information is 
available from "Max" at ABC Lanes. 




Welcome College Students 

Court & Willow Cafe 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 

Lunch • 

Dinner • 

Sunday Brunch (10:00-2:00) 

_ Imported Beer 
Deli Sandwiches & Salads 
Gourmet Soups • - 
Homemade Desserts • 

20% Discount with I.D. 
Good thru March 30, 1987 



SPOTLIGHTDMondij, Mareb 2, 1M7d7 



ACROSS 


46 GH inventory 

47 Former Oriental VIP 


12 


Place of fabulous 
wealth 


1 Three golden apple 


s 48 legs 


13 


Large marine fish 


caught her 


49 Business abbrevi- 




(2 wds.) 


9 Fire remnants 


ation 


Ih 


Roof workers 


14 Companions 


SO Asian temple 


21 


Little 


IS Climbs a wall 


53 High-speed plane 


n 


Intelligence 


17 Comes before in 


54 Salt Lake City 


■/] 


Burmese and 


time 


resident 




Laotians 


18 Open shoe 


S6 Calmness 


?n 


Courtroom conmand 


19 Hr, Fleming 


59 Stingy ones 


29 


Pismire 


20 Pin for holding 


60 Nr. Scrooge 


30 


noire 


meat 


61 Horse 


32 


Argentine money 


22 et labora 


62 Shocks 


H 


Idle 


23 Hill<fish 




14 


Bone substance 


24 Soak flax 


DOWN 


IS 


Lost continent 


2S Spoiled child 


36 


Car part (2 wds.) 


26 Space agency 


1 Way (Roman 

highway) 


i; 


Now. in Aberdeen 


28 Scold 


39 


Selects 


30 Valiant 


2 UUII island 


41 


iiang down 


31 Revolves 


3 Boxing sites 


43 


Judicial Inquest 


33 Chief 


4 Business abbrevi- 


44 


Bother 


34 Host shrewd 


ation 


45 


Woodland deities 


37 Countries 


5 Collection of note 


47 


Parsonage 


38 Army conmand 


6 Profits 


SO 


Golf scores 


(2 wds.) 


7 Journey 


51 


Liability 


39 Cheat 


8 States positively 


52 Region 


40 Grassy plain 


9 Balance sheet item 


55 


The Little Red 


41 Brake part 


10 Skin mark 


57 


Famous Siamese twin 


42 Dumbbells 


U Chinese dynasty 


58 


Opposite of pes. 



This Week's Puzzle Brought to You By... 

Cathy's Diner 

1170 W. 4tb St. * WUIiamsport, Pa. 17701 • Phone 323-3224 




©Edward Julius Collegiate CW84 



Answer somewhere In this Issue 



College's PBL unit to host 
regional meet this week 



The Region Seven Spring Leader- 
ship Conference of the Future 
Business Leaders of America Inc. wiil 
be hosted by the Coilege chapter of Phi 
Beta Lamba on Thursday, according to 
Paul W. Goldfeder. state adviser. 

Goldfeder and Martin T. Green, a 
bus iness management student arul 
club president from Williamsport will 
welcome approximately 300 students 
from 1 1 area high schools. The 
students will compete in 22.t3usiness- 
related events, Goldfeder said. 

Students from senior high schools 
in the following districts will attend: 
Jersey Shore, Sullivan County, Ber- 
wick, Central Columbia, Locl< Haven, 
Mansfield, Millville, Montgomery, Mon- 
toursvilie. and Jersey Shore Junior 
High School. 

Goldfeder said Bruce Boncal, of 



the business education department of 
Jersey Shore High School will coor- 
dinate the conference. 

After a meal in the Susquehanna 
Room, the students will have a second 
business session in the Academic 
Center Auditorium at 7 p.m. Officers 
wiilha sAlocted and trophies presentecJ 
to the winners of the day's events at 
this time, Goldfeder said. 

In other PBL news, the winner of 
the Valentine candy drawing on Friday, 
Feb. 13 was Danielle Delawder, the 
2'/2-year-old granddaughter of James 
E. Lenhard, a business administration 
student from Shamokin Dam. 

In addition, Goldfeder said 
be attending a state executive board 
meeting for PBL this Saturday, March 7 
in the Sheraton Inn in State College. 



What is it? 




staff Artist Jim Ooan was asked to give us a drawing of our 
pet mutt, but he was a bit pressed for time so he ended up with 
a drawing of....whaf? [Answer somewhere in this issue] 



Scholars in Education Award 
eligibility details outlined 
by financial aid director 



students interested in pursuing a 
career as a math or science teacher in 
Pennsylvania may qualify for a 
Scholars in Education Award through 
the Pennsylvania Higher Education 
Assistance Agency (PHEAA), accor- 
ding to Donald S. Shade, director of 
financial aid. 

Through this program, Shade 
said, elegible students can receive 
awards ranging from $1 ,500 up to 50 
percent of tuition per year. 

According to Shade, eligibility for 
the SEA program is based on 
academic achievement in college 
coursework, college board scores, and 
other similar criteria. 

in addition, students must be Pen- 



nsylvania residents enrolled full-time in 
a bachelor's degree program at one of 
the 78 Pennsylvania schools, colleges, 
or universities that provide certified 
teacher training programs for math or 
science. 

Students enrolled at the Com- 
munity College are not eligible for the 
award, but those transferring to an ap- 
proved school may be eligible. 

The deadline to apply for the 
Scholars in Education Award program 
is May 1, 1987. Additional information 
about the program and applications for 
the award are available in the Financial 
Aid Office and from Thomas C. Shoff, 
transfer counselor in the Advisement 
and Career Services Center. 



i/WrtlVWWWIWUWVWrtW^^rtftl^rfWrt^WJW^V^^WV^^^VW/V^rfVVW i; 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
^ ^ ^^ PHONE 323-7443 

'\^^'^ One Block from W.A.C.C. 
DAILY SPECIALS 

Hours: Moo. -Sit. II i.m. lo 9 p.m. Clostd Sundiy 




Monday 


Regular Sub 


Whole 


$1.70 


Cosmo 


$2.10 


Tuesday 


Meatball 


Whole 


$1.85 


Cosmo 


$2.30 


Wednesday 


Turkey 


Whole 


$1 50 


Cosmo 


$1.95 


Thursday 


Ham 


Whole 


$1.90 


Cosmo 


$2.35 


Friday 


Tuna 


Whole 


$1.80 


Cosmo 


$2.25 


Saturday 


Cheese Steak 


Whole 


$2.50 


Cosmo 


$2.95 



•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" 

$4.20 W/HOLE $2,10 HALF 



8nSPOTLIGHTDMond«)r, Much 2. 1»87 




BULLETIN BOARD 

Foi week of Monday. March 2 through Sunday. March 8 
MEETINGS 

SGA Executive Committee. .3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 3, 
Room B107, LEC. 

Alpha Omega...? to 9 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 3, Room 133, 
ACC. 

Narcotics Anonymous. every Wednesday, 7 p.m., Room B107, LEC. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... business meeting every Tuesday from noon to 1 
p.m., Room B107, LEC. 

Delta Phi Omega. .3 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 3, Room 103, 

SALES, FUND-RAISERS 

Bake Sale. Gamma Epsilon Tau, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. this Wednesday. 
March 4, ACC lobby. 

Daffodil Sale. ..SGA will take orders from all campus offices during the 
month of March. Extra flowers will be sold from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday, 
March 27, ACC lobby. Daffodils are $3 per bunch. All proceeds will benefit the 
American Cancer Society. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

City Bus.. .Students with validated ID may ride at reduced rates. Info from 
College Activities Office, Gym. 

Movie tickets... U A movie tickets now available in College Bookstore, 
$2.75 each. Sponsored by SGA. 

Swimming. ..W. ACC. students who are not members of the YMCA may 
use pool during certain hours; contact College Activities Office tor up-to- 
minute listing on hours; $2 per person charge with W.A.C.C. ID. 

Student Health Services.. .Room 104, Gym. Registered nurse on duty to 
treat minor illness and refer to physician or facility most capable of providing 
additional treatment. Hours are 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 



Cillo's 
College Co rner 



PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Tbird SI. 

(Next to the Academic Center) 

HOURS* 

Mon. thrn Than. 

7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. 

Fridiy, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 



LUNCH SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 

^H^\.y MbA T BALL ANU t; Ht ESg 

$1.65 REQULARLYS1.B5I»Mcl 



Play LUCKV NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 

BREAKFAST SPECIA^^ 
THIS \^'EEK J^ 

STEAK • CHEESE * EGG • SUB 

$1.50 REGULARLY $1.eO Txlncl. 



MAYNARD FERGUSON - plcturad at left Is the \a. 
Saturday. March 14. See story. Page 4 



: musician who will perform locally c 




ACTIVITIES 

Film, sponsored by the Film Society, 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., Thursday, 
-Morcf-TTTanO Fnday. March 13. ACC Aucltorlum. W.A.C.C. students get In 
free with ID. public prices vary. The film scheduled is '28 Up". 

Film... Sponsored by SGA, 8 p.m., Wednesday. March 11, ACC 
Auditorium. Admission is free to students with ID, $1 without. The film will be 
"House" (rated R) "House" is a horror/comedy story starring William Katt, 

"The Odd Couple" (female version). ..performance by the Wiiliamsport 
Players, both performances 8 to 10 p.m. this Friday and Saturday, March 6 
and 7. ACC Auditorium. Tickets are $5. 

Maya Angelou...7 p.m., Tuesday, March 24, ACC Auditorium. She will 
deliver a reading/lecture. The reading is "1 Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". 
Tickets are $2 and available in the Gym, Room 108. 

Seminar. .7 to 10 p.m., Wednesday, March 4, Bucknell University. Col- 
lege Activities will participate. 

The Wiiliamsport Civic Chorus. ..presented by the Local Artist Series, 8 to 
10 p.m., Monday, May 18, ACC Auditorim. Ticket price has not been deter- 
mined. 

Lock Haven Symphony.. .8 p.m., Monday, March 23, ACC Auditorium. 
Sponsored by the Local Artists Series. Admission is free. 

1 0th Annual Bluegrass Festival.. .7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 7, Susquehan- 
na Room. Free to W.A.C.C. students and staff with ID. No advance ticket 
sales, pay at the door 

Maynard Ferguson. .8 p.m., Saturday, March 14, Scottish Rite 
Auditorium. Sponsored by the Performing Artist Series. For more information, 
call 326-4763 and for tickets ask for ext. 7269. 
BLOODMOBILE 

Bloodmobile...10 a.m. to 2 p.m. next Tuesday, March 10, Earth Science 
Campus. Sponsored by SGA and the Lycoming County Chapter of the 
American Red Cross. 

Bloodmobile...9:45 to 3:45 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday, March 24 and 
25, Main Campus Gym. Sponsored by SGA and the Lycoming County 
Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

BUS TRIPS 

New York City. ..Saturday, March 28, the bus leaves the College at 6 a.m. 
and returns leaving NYC at 9 p.m. Transportation costs are $20 for W.A.C.C. 
students, faculty/staff, and alumni; $22 for the general public. Deadline for 
reservations is Monday, March 16. 

Washington DC Saturday. April 11, the bus leaves the College at 6 
a.m. and returns leaving Washington D.C. at 9 p.m. Transportation costs are 
$20 for W.A.C.C. students, faculty/staff, and alumni; $22 for the general 
public. Deadline for reservations is Friday, March 27. 

For more info and reservations call 327-4763. Seals are confirmed upon 
payment and money is not refundable. The College is not responsible for pro- 
perty theft and damage or injury which may occur. 



JWACX: ARCHIVE; 



SPOTLIGHT 

Mondi;, Much 16, 1987 • Vol. 22, No. 25 • 8 Ptgei 
WiUiimsport Area Commgnily Colkfc • WilUimiport, Pi. 1771)1 



College's 'Open House' next Sunday 



"Nothing Short of Spectacular" 
will be the theme (or the College's 
Open House, according to Mrs. Elaine 
J. Lannbert. director of communica- 
tions at the College. Mrs. Lambert said 
the Open House will be Sunday, March 
22 from noon to 4:30 p.m. at the Main 
Campus and at the Earth Science Cam- 
pus. 

The Open House gives visitors an 
opportunity to see various College pro- 
grams and services "in action" as well 
as to ask questions about the college 
and its offerings. 

Among other highlights; 

Clowns, basketmaking 

demonstrations, painting demonstra- 
tions, flower arranging sessions, and a 
magician will be in the Lifelong Educa- 
tion Center. 

The Susquehanna Room will be 
open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. A buffet 
breakfast will be served until 1 1 :30. 
After that, "the Open House dinner" 
will be served. 

The Bookstore will be open from 9 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. so students may look 
at school materials. 

The Admissions Office will hold In- 
formative sessions for prospective 
students in the Academic Center 
Auditorium at 1 1 a.m. and at 1 2 and 1 
p.m. These sessions will answer the 
questions the students may have about 
costs, transferring, and placement. 

Prospective students were sent in- 
vitations to attend these sessions by 
the College, according to Mrs. 
Lambert. 

The Colege Library will be open 
during Open House from noon to 9 
p.m. There will be displays inside, 
showing the Library's resource 
materials, according to Mrs. Lambert. 

Mrs. Lambert said the Advisement 
and Career Center will be open so 
students "can explore their educational 
plans". 

On the third floor of the Academic 
Center will be information on several 
organizations within the College, in- 
cluding New Horizons, a group for 
single parents or homemakers: Project 
ReEntry, for people without high 
school diplomas; Career Exploration in 
Non-Traditional Occupations; and 
Vocational Diagnostic Services, for 
handicapped people. 

Also on the third floor, Phi Beta 
Lambda will provide cookies and 
punch for visitors outside Room 305 
during Open House. 

Business and Computer 
Technologies Division will have a 
display on the third floor and will hold 
seminars on helpful hints for job suc- 
cess. These seminars will help people 
who are searching for a job, according 



to Mrs. Lambert. 

Titles of the seminars include 
"Dress for Success"; "Resumes and 
Cover Letters"; and "Motivation in 
Business". 

There will be tours of the third 
floor every half hour. 

On the third floor, individuals will 
be able to test their typing speed In the 
Individual Learning Center, try the IBM 
computers, see the word processors, 
and pick up new tax forms and see the 
new tax laws demonstrated on the 
computers. 

The Financial Aid Office, on the 
second floor of the ACC, will be open 
to help students apply for aid. They will 
also give individual estimates of of aid 
eligibilty. 

There will be a table set up in the 
Learning Resources Center for infor- 
mation about the Student Government 
Association. It is sponsored by the 
SGA and they will be giving out a hous- 
ing newsletter, student handouts, and 
SGA applications. 

Tables will be set up in the Learn- 
ing Resources Center that will have in- 
formation about Individual and General 
Sludies. and a table will be set up (or a 
videocamera commentary on "The 
New World of Mass Communications". 

A table offering Individual and 
General Studies will also be set up in 
the Academic Center Lobby. 

Health Sceinces will have an infor- 
mation table in the Learning Resources 
Lobby, They will of(er emergency 
phone dirctory cards (or people. They 
will also have a display set up outside 
o( LeJeune Chef concerning food pro- 
grams, and will have demonstrations 
about garnishing and ice sculpturing. 

According to Mrs. Lambert, on the 
first floor of the Learning Resources 
Center will be registration (or alumni o( 
the College, And there will be an ex- 
perimental learning display in Room 
157. On the second door will be Ar- 
chitec^ iral Technology exhibits o( 
work, drawings, and models. 

She said (her will be several 
demonstrations in the Building Trades 
Center, Including a demonstration in 
weatherization training about air intiltra- 
tion in residential structures; computer 
estimating (or construction projects; 
plumbing and heating; and air condi- 
tioning and retrigeration 

Examples o( student masonary 
projects will also be displayed there. 

The Technology Trades Center 
will hold a demonstration about hero 
robots in construction work. 

In the machine shop area there 
will be demonstrations including 
robotics, welding, and welding using 
robotics. 



WWAS Radio will be giving tours 
o( the studio and will be on the air. Sta(( 
will show videos in the studio during 
Open House. 

The Rec Center, in the LEC, will 
be open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Mrs. Lambert said that in the Gym, 
thereAfiil be a Shotokan Karate Exhibit 
at 2 p.m. On the first floor of the Gym, 
skin caliper body mass calculations 
will be taken, the nurse will be on duty, 
and the College Activities Office will be 
open to give information on upcoming 
events and ticket sales. 

Events there will include a used 
book sale by the Women's Forum. In 
addition to books donated by Brodart, 
Inc. (or the sale, the club will ofter 
books donated at specidc locations 




throughout the College. This sale will 
also display books by authors that are 
(eatured in the Women's Series. 

Biology, chemistry, and physics 
lab in the LEC will be open and 
students will be holding demonstra- 
tions. Demonstrations in computer 
design will be held in the dratting labs 
In the LEC, 

In the basement o( the Academic 
Center, according to Mrs. Lambert, the 
Integrated Studies Division will have an 
exhibit o( student artwork in Rooms 4 
and 5. Computer and Colorgraphic 
work and a students' photography ex- 
hibit will be in the room. 

The Graphic Arts department and 
the SPOTLIGHT will ot(er tours o( their 
rooms all day during Open House. 

The SPOTLIGHT sta(( will 
distribute a special "preview edition" 
o( the regularly-distributed Monday stu- 
dent newspaper. 

Graphic Arts will also o((er hands- 
on exhibit in photo typesetting, during 
which individuals will be able to use the 
typesetting machine, and an exhibit on 
platemaklng, which includes free 
samples, including memo pads. 

Members o( Gamma Epsilon Tau 
will act as tour guides (rem 1 2 to 4:30 
p.m. 

At the Automotive Trades Center, 
there will be cars on display, a wheel 
alignment demonstration, and a classic 
car show i( the wea(her permits. 

Developmental Sludies, said Mrs. 
Lambert, will be In the Tutorial Center, 
(or the staff to give tours and answer 
questions. 

Mrs. Lambert said there will be 
many events at the Earth Science 
Campus. There will be a heavy equip- 
ment rodeo, which is a competition 
among students. Displays o( wedding 
(lowers, plants, and equipment are in- 
cluded. 

There will be tours o( the 
greenhouse, spring bulb plant sales, 
and various contests, such as a milking 
contest, and a tree pruning contest. 

The Horticulture Club will have a 
tour, demonstrations, and a (lower sale 
at the Earth Science Campus. 

A cal( will be on the (rent lawn o( 
the campus, which is where the con- 
tests will take place. 

Buses will run every halt hour (rom 
the College to the Earth Science Cam- 
pus. 

Ambulance service will be provid- 
ed at the Earth Sciences Campus in 
case of emergencies. 

Mrs. Lambert said she would like 
to remind everyone that this Open 
House will not include the Professional 
Development Center, which Is not yet 
open to the public. 



laSPOTUGHTDMondi;, Much It, 19S7 



OPINION / COMMENT 



Thanks, Kate 
Thanks, A Hie: 
for memories 



T*l«vlslon Commentary 

By Dale E. Llnganfaltar 

Broadcaating atudant Iron Eaat Fraadom 

"Kate and Allie". which airs Mon- 
days at 8 p m. on CBS, was excep- 
tional the weel< Allie was found 
dreaming of old TV shows. Her dreams 
revealed the stars as cast members of 
other shows. 

Stars Jane Curtin and Susan Saint 
James were shown as the loveable 
Lucy Ricardo and Ethel Mertz. This 
brought bacl( fond memories of the 



days when "I Love Lucy" was a regular 
part of all of our lives. 

Allie's dream also drifted to "The 
Mary Tyler Moore Show" in which the 
two become Mary Richards and Rhoda 
Morganstern. 

It was different to see other TV 
characters and a "plus" for "Kate and 
Allie" — whose rating have been 
drooping lately due to the NBC hit, 
"Alf ', which is on in the same time slot. 

Kate and Allie gave some of us a 
chance to relive the past — and for that 
we thank the producers of this show. 




BIF THE BUNNY... who's fielpiny the SPOTLIGHT 
money for a field trip, visited the graphic 
section recently. Bif 1- ep t his eye on Cindy Kuz 
above, as she applied adhesive wax to materials 
gave some technical advice to Tony Rife, above 
right... and just was a good listener foi- Greg 
in tfie layout /design practicum lab. Chances to 
Blf -- a "giant" smile-provoking stuff.= d bunny 
by yPOTLIGHT staffer Margie Flanagan -- are on 
starting this week. 



SPOTLIGHT 
Monday. March 16. 1987 ■ Vol. 22, No. 25 

Tile SPOTLIGHT Is published each iylonday morning of the academic year, ex- 
cept tor College vacations, by mass communications and other Interested students 
of The Wlillamsport Area Community College 

Office Room 7, Academic Center, 1005 W Third St., Wiiliamaport Pa 
17701 Telephone: (717) 326-3761. Extension 7533 



LETTERS TO SPOTIIOHT READERS 
and NEWS REPORT CONTRIBUTIONS 

Lelteis to SPOTLIGHT readers and other contributions should be typed 
double-spaced and may be hand-carried or sent to the SPOTLIGHT oHice In the 
Academic Center Letters and all other material submitted lor publication will be 
reviewed by the newspaper stall and may be re|ected with a statement as to 
reason All letters must be signed; signatures must be authenticated by a member 
01 the newspaper stall No letter will be published without the writers name 




SPOTUGHTDMoidiy, Mwcb li, I9r7a3 



ACROSS ^^ Woman's name or 22 Jacques Cousteau's 

1 With lO-Across, 50 Scientist's work 25 Picture game 
famed spy 59 " and a Woman" 26 Make a great effort 

5 ...partridge in 60 Gay 27 Classic movie 

tree 61 Capri, for one western 

10 See l-Across 62 Sodium chloride 28 Type of vote 

14 Birthstone 63 Cordage fiber 29 Heart chambers 

15 Words of denial 64 But; Fr. 30 Dine at home 

16 Mr. Preminger 65 Catch sight of (2 wds.) 

17 Type of word 66 Contestant 31 Like Jacques Brel 

18 Certain playing 67 Adam's grandson 32 The Marx Brothers' 
card "A Day at the " 

19 well: Sp. 34 Part of a circle 

20 Promptness UUWN 45 jhe age of some 

23 Clothing size 1 Player's turn septuagenarians 
(abbr.) 2 Highest point 41 Geometric curve 

24 Zodiac sign 3 Infield cover 42 In a clich^d 

25 Takes it easy 4 Italian architect manner 

(2 wds.) 5 West Indies island 43 M*A*S*H star 

29 As hungry 6 Sweet wine 44 Daily occurrence in 

33 Enliven 7 Small case England 

35 Living room: Sp. 8 Military equipment, 46 avion 

36 Opie's aunt for short 50 Alleviate 

37 Hockey great 9 Drive back 51 Certain holiday, 

38 Spasm 10 Associates for short 

39 Vases familiarly 52 Insect appendage 
41 Tending to stir up 11 "It's - — ■ game" 53 Water pipe 

45 In a sloped 12 Map notations 54 Formerly 
manner (abbr.) 55 Approaching 

47 Francis and Dahl 13 Charged particles 56 "No man island" 

48 Monetary worth 21 Certain doctoral 57 Sundry assortment 
(abbr.) degree (abbr.) 58 Robert Stack role 










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©Edward Julius Collegiate CW84.14 






Cathy's Diner 

1170 W. 4th St. • WUIiamsport, Pa. 17701 • Phone 323-3224 


Puzzle answer on page 7 






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Instructor attends 
Florida conference 

A conference of the Society for 
Applied Learning Tectinoiogies (SALT) 
was tieid in the Oriando Hyatt Hotel in 
Orlando, Fla,, Feb. 18 through 20, ac- 
cording to Greg E. Gerenza, instructor 
of computer science, who attended the 
event. 

Gerenza said, "The purpose of the 
conference was to bring together 
private and public sector organizations 
and educational institutions interested 
in using optical laser technologies and 
computers for training and educational 
purposes." 

The conclusion drawn by the con- 
ference was that there will be a shift to 
the use of optical laser discs as a 
means of data storage and as an in- 
structional device, "particularly when 
linked with video," Gerenza said. 

Gerenza cited some advantages 
of optical laser discs over magnetic 
tapes and disks. They are more 
durable, have a quicker access speed, 
text and video can be stored on the 
same disc, excellent quality of sound 
and picture, and storage of data in a 
smaller space. 

Gerenza added that the society 
sees a growth in "interactive educa- 
tional programs" as a result of laser 
technology. 

Food supervisor resigns 

John G. Vitali, supervisor of food 
services operations, resigned in late 
February to go into business for 
himself, according to David A. Hoyes, 
director of business operations. 

Vitali's last day was Feb. 20. He 
was to be going into business in his 
hometown of Scranton. He had been 
supervisor since the food services 
department was begun three years 



MULTI-CULTURAL SOCIETY 

TO HOLD REORGANIZATION 

MEETING TOMORROW; 

EVERYONE INVITED 

The Multi-Cultural Society, an organization which works toward bringing 
people of different cultural backgrounds together for social and cultural events, 
is seeking new members. 

According to Caivetta A. Walker, co-adviser of the group, the society is 
open to all interested students. 

A reorganization meeting will be held at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow in Room 1 51 , 
Learning Resources Center. 

"We hope anyone with any question about the organiztion will stop by," 
the adviser commented. 

Information is also available by calling her or K^aryAnn R. Lampman, co- 
adviser, at College Ext. 7454, or by visiting Room 159 in the Learning 
Resources Center. 

'Firebird' to be given March 28 



The Puppet Factory's presentation 
of 'Firebird" will be held Saturday, 
lularch 28, according to (wis. JoAnn R. 
Fremiottl, College activities coor- 
dinator. 

Two performances will be given. 
One will be at 2 p.m. in the Young 
Women's Christian Assn. and the other 
will be at 7 p.m. at North Campus. 

individual tickets are available for 
$2. Tickets may be purchased through 
the mall by sending a check with 



name, address, and telephone number 
to: College Activities, Williamsport 
Area Community College, 1005 W. 
Third St., Williamsport, Pa. 
17701-5799. 

Tickets and other information may 
also be secured by telephoning 
327-4763, Ext. 7269. 



Armed Forces 
Voc Aptitude 
test sclieduied 

The Advisement and Career Ser- 
vices Center is sponsoring the ad- 
ministration of the Armed Services 
Vocational Aptitude Battery on cam- 
pus on Wednesday and Thursday, 
Inarch 25 and 26. 

The test will be given from 1 to 
4:30 p.m. in the Academic Center 
Auditorium, according to Lawrence W. 
Emery Jr., director of Advisement and 
Career Services. 

"Students who may be interested 
in exploring their own aptitudes or ex- 
ploring options in the various branches 
of the military are urged to sign up to 
take the test on one of the two days it Is 
offered," Emery said. 

He added that having scores on 
the test "will be useful when a student 
wants to explore specific opportunities 
in the military". 

Sign-up. additional information, 
pick-up of preparatory booklet: Advise- 
ment and Career Services Center, 
Room 157, Learning Resources 
Center. 




W.A.C.C.'s No. 1 
Radio Station 



M H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ ■■ h i| 



Buy 2tny size Little Caesars 
Original round pizza at regular 
price, get the identical pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 




W.A.C.C. itndenli un 
•ddilkiiiil 10% ool; wilh 
itmkm I.D. ud tU> id. 



One coupon per customer Cany out only At participating locaHons 



4DSPOTUGIITDMoadi;. Mireh 1(. 1987 



^* 



.oV-* 



Ae^ 



The SPOTLIGHT is continuing to 
collect books to donate to the Lycom- 
ing Literacy Project 



WHMEN'S FCIRUM BROWN BAG LUNCH THIS WECK 

Mr,. Ann Gimpert, prevent ion proqrai 
special i5.t from West Branch Drug ami 
Alcohol, will speak on "Warning Sign?, o 
Drug and Alcohol Abuse" this Thursday 
from 11:30. to 13:30 in Room '♦03, rtcadijm 
Center . 

According to Ch(?r i Hilton, 
coordinator of career gu i dance/ Ira i n i nq 
frn single parents and hoinemal< er s , 
S.M.I.L.i;. support groups p.ir t it i |ian t s 
attendance may (i3e khe hour _*s credit 
tow.ird their commitiient to New Horizons 

She emphasized that the session is 
not limited to members or to women. 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

^One Block from W.A.C.C. 

DAILY SPECIALS 

Houn: Mon.-Sil. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Clowd Sondiy 



^/^ 



Monday Regular Sub 

Tuesday Meatball 

Wednesday Turkey 

Thursday Ham 

Friday Tuna 

Saturday Cheese Sleak 



Whole 
Whole 
Whole 
Whole 
Whole 
Whole 



$1.70 
$1.85 
$1 50 
$1 90 
$1 80 
$2.50 



Cosmo 
Cosmo 
Cosmo 
Cosmo 
Cosmo 
Cosmo 



•Subs Ml Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" 

$4.20 WHOLE $2 10 HALF 




SPOTLIGHTaMonday, Much U, U87d5 



SHare a 
little-lovfe, 
(A/ith sofneone 
■fcodaW 




DONATE 
BLOOD 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 



THE WILUAMSPORT AREA COMMUNTTY COLLEGE 



6DSPOTLIGHTaMo«li;, Mircb ii, 1987 



$GA SPONSORING CA$H 
GAME SHOW TOMORROW 



By Margie Flanagan 
Of the SPOTLIGHT SUff 

"Blizzard of Bucks", a game show 
in which you "grab for cash", will be at 
the College tomorrow. The show is 
sponsored by the Student Government 
Association, 

Everyone is invited to participate 
and watch as friends and others com- 
pete lor cash prizes. 

All who are interested must sign 
up by noon tomorrow at the sign-up 
table in the Learning Resources Center 
foyer if they wish to compete, accor- 
ding to the SGA representative. 

The show will begin at 1 ;45 in the 
Susquehanna Room, 

Three groups of four contestants 
are selected by a random drawing 
throughout the show. Each group then 
Is guided through what is described as 
"the wackiest game". 

By the process of elimination, 
there is one finalist from each group. 
Each of the finalists is immediately 
rewarded with $25 in cash. 

The three finalists then compete in 
additional "wild" games, trying for the 
maximum lime In the "money 
machine". 

The winners then "grab for cash" 
rewards of up to $500. 

Prize money totaling $250 is 
guaranteed lor each show. 

Buckley lecture 
tickets now $6 

A special rate of $6 each for 
students and educators who want to at- 
tend a lecture by columnist William F. 
Buckley Jr. is still begin offered, accor- 
ding to Catharine K. Ertel and Kathleen 
A. Weir, co-chairpersons for the event. 

Buckley will lecture at 8 p.m.. 
Thursday, April 9, In the Capitol 
Theater in downtown Willlamsport. 

His lecture is the second in the 
series entitled Capitol Comments 
which was arranged by the 
Willlamsport Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association. 

Additional information; Telephone 
YWCA. 322-4637. 

ATC 

1981 Honda 185S. 3 wheeler. 
Good condition. Call 326-4467. $475 
w/helmet. 




PAUL I^DMIZ 



THE WIZARD OF BLIZZARD 



College budget okayed 

By Cathy Hannon, of The SPOTLIGHT Staff 

The College Board of Trustees held its monthly meeting at 8 p.m., Mon- 
day, March 2 in the board room of the Lifelong Education Center, 

The board approved the 1987-1988 postsecondary operating and capital 
budget which totalled $1 8,932.805. The budget reflects an increase of 1 ,5 per- 
^^-^^—^^^^—^^^^—^^— cent over the current 1 986-1 987 year. 
Only one board member, Harry 
Dietrick, did not vote in favor of the 
budget, Dietrick did not approve of the 
transfer of $650,000 from the capital 
budget to be put into the operating 
budget 

Dietrick also objected to the Col- 
lege collecting $270 in capital charges 
from non-sponsored students and us- 
ing it for operating expenses at the Col- 




SGA raises 
$464 to give 
to IVIS fund 

The Student Government 
Association raised $464,54 to donate 
to the multiple sclerosis fund, accor- 
ding to Ms. Kathy L.Cobb, student ac- 
tivities assistant and SGA adviser. 

The money was raised through a 
dance and the Valentine's Day lollipop 
sale. 

The fund-raisers were sponsored 
in conjunction with Students Against 
Multiple Sclerosis, which is based in 
New York City. 

SGA has other fund-raisers plann- 
ed, including a daffodil sale, the ad- 
viser said. 



Students to help 
with diet plans 
to note 'month' 



For National Nutrition Month, cur- 
rently being observed, dietetic techni- 
cian students will be developing the 
theme. "Health Through Nutrition: 
Your Choice", according to Mrs. Vi- 
vian Moon, associate professor of food 
and hospitality management. 

To help people make wise 
choices, she said, students have a 
display In the College Library of meal 
and snack choices. Each week, two 
students will emphasize another nutri- 
tion factor. The same team will have an 
explanation in the campus media. 

Any person who wishes to have a 
one to three-day dietary analysis. Mrs, 
Moon said, may complete a "blue 
form" available in the Library. 



SHOW FCATUliE!; 
ZZARD or BUCKS 




Dr, Robert L. Breuder. president of 
the College, explained that the transfer 
of funds was not illegal and the budget 
transfer may not happen unless money 
from the state doesn't cover a potential 
$650,000 operating deficit. 

The new budget includes tuition 
raises for city-sponsored and non- 
sponsored students. Sponsored 
students (city) will pay $1 .81 and non- 
sponsored students will pay $3,508. 

The budget will have to go before 
the Willlamsport City Council for ap- 
proval. 

The board also covered several 
other items during the meeting. It ap- 
proved two bids: One for new elec- 
tronic work stations and one for a new 
laser processing machining systems 
center. 

The board approved a bid from 
the Lista International Corporation for 
$75,091 for 40 four-person work sta- 
tions and 1 1 two-person work stations. 
The College is paying for these work 
stations through a Vocational Educa- 
tion Grant in the amount of 
$1,140,885, 

A bid for $109,000 for the laser 
processing machining systems center 
from the Lumonics Material Processing 
Corporation was approved by the 
board. The College will pay for the 
center through a Vocational Education 
Equipment Grant for $109,000, 

The board approved three resolu- 
tions which included the reimburse- 
ment of costs related to the Stage II 
Building Program which amounted to 
$20,906; the reimbursement of costs 
related to the Stage III Building Project 
Program, which amounted to $91 ,807, 
and the reimbursement of costs related 
to the Professional Development 
Center which totaled $28,277. 

The board approved several per- 
sonnel items and then the president 
and chairperson gave their reports. 

In his president's report. Dr. 
Breuder thanked the members of the 
press, saying there was "excellent 
coverage.,." about the opening of the 
new Professional Development Center. 

In her chairperson's report, Mrs. 
Kathryn Lumley talked about the new 
Professional Development Center, say- 
ing it was "absolutely beautiful" and a 
"monument to excellence". 

The next Board of Trustees 
meeting will be at 8 p.m., Monday, 
April 6, in the board room of the 
Lifelong Education Center, 



SPOTLIGHTD Monday, Minh 16, 19870? 



Job Ops 



The following employment opportunity information /s provided by tne col- 
lege's Advisement and Career Services Center as a service to students. Ques- 
tions about listings here should be directed to that office which is in the Learn- 
ing Resources Center. 

Mrs. Ben Comfort, Jr. in Ralston has some plumbing and electrical work 
she would like students to do. Call her at (71 7) 995-5591 for more details. 

Ridgway, 801 Central Rd., Bloomsburg, PA 17815 has immediate full- 
time, permanent and part-time openings for Food & Hospitality students to 
start as cooks for eventual management responsibilities. This can be used as 
an immediate co-op or a summer co-op or internship. Send a resume to 
Richard Ridgway or call him at (71 7) 784-8354. 

Eastern Milk Producers, P.O. Box 601 , Syracuse, NY 1 321 7 has an open- 
ing for a BM or RIA spring graduate to train for three or four months in a dairy 
store in Canton, PA and to relocate wherever a vacancy would occur in New 
York or Pennsylvania. Send a resume to Paula Agor, Personnel Iwlanager. 

H & H Associates, P.O. Box 697, (4705 E. Trindle Rd.), Camp Hill. PA 
17011 has an opening for an HVAC inside man. Call Nora at (71 7) 761-4370 
for an appointment for an interview or send a resume. 

Faiini Construction, 221 Marshall St., Kennett Square, PA 19348 has an 
opening for a full-time finish carpenter and also an opening for a student for 
summer work. This could possibly be used for a co-op. Write or call Emidio 
Faiini at (21 5) 444-3188. 

Miller Plumbing & Heating, 1900 W. End Ave., Pottsvllle, PA 17901 has 
an opening for a Plumbing graduate for installation and service. Call Paul Zim- 
merman at (717) 622-1722 or send him a resume. 

Pine Barn Inn, 1 Pine Barn Place, Danville, Pa. 17847 has an opening for 
an assistant chef or a line cook, mostly evenings 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Looking for 
someone with initiative and a self-starter. Will need a recommendation of in- 
structor. Send a resume to Ralph E. Richardson, chef. 

Easton Mack Truck, 4490 Easton Ave., Bethlehem, Pa. 18017, has an 
opening for a couple of diesei mechanics for general shop work. Call Mr. 
Casey at (21 5) 865-6762 for an appointment for an interview. 

Kmart's district manager from the Rochester area would like resumes 
from retail management and business management graduates sent to Ida 
Ballade, apparel manager, Kmart Apparel, 1000 N. Elmira St., Sayre, Pa. 
18840-2696. Interviews will be conducted at a local Kmart store in May. 
Placements could occur anywhere from the Rochester area to Sayre, Pa, 

Kinney Shoes, Lycoming Mail, has an opening for management trainees 
and part-time employees — both immediate and for spring. Deadline for leav- 
inga resume with Mrs. Elmer In Room 157, LRC was last Friday, March 13. 
Applications are available for tool design technology graduates for Elfab 
Corporation, Lewisviile, Texas (in the Dallas area). They may be picked up in 
the Advisement Center. 

Bartlett Tree Experts, 1 1 Crabb Ave., Rockville, Md. 20850 is interested 
in resumes from any graduates who are interested in the area of trees in an ur- 
ban setting (especially forest technology). Send to the attention of Frido van 
Kesteren, area manager. 

H.B. McClure Co., 1515 Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa. 17105 has openings 
and would like resumes from RA, RC, and PL graduates for installation and 
service. They are a large mechanical contractor. Send resumes to Michael 
Monn, field superintendent. 

Petroleum Helicopters Inc. Lafayette, La. has sent the Advisement Center 
Job descriptions and applications for A&P certified mechanics. 

Woodward-Clyde Consultants, 51 20 Butler Pike, Plymouth Meeting, Pa. 
19462 would like resumes from civil engineering technology graduates. They 
want to fill a position as a field construction inspector on 
earthworks and foundation construction projects. 

Shop Vac, 2323 Reach Road, has notified the Advisement Center of se- 
cond shift openings (3:30-midnight) Monday through Friday. Stop by the Per- 
sonnel Office at the plant and fill out an application from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Phillips Supply House, 103 E. Fourth St., Williamsport, has an opening for 
an electronic technician for servicing electronic business machines in the shop 
and on the road. Send a resume to Dick Leidhecker, Service Manager. 

Scaife Valley Press, 31 5 Sherman St., Williamsport, PA has two openings 
for Graphic Arts graduates. One is for a typesetter, layout and paste-up. The 
other is for a pressman for a Multilith and Davidson press. Call Lois Snyder at 
322-31 32 for an appointment for an interview. 

Audio Services, 1307y2 Washington Blvd., Williamsport needs a person 
to install radios in automobiles and security systems. Possibly some bench 
work also. Part-time to start. Send resume or letter of application to John Mint- 
zer. 

CAMPUS RECRUITING 
United Technical Associates Inc. from Harrisburg and Reading will be on 
campus on March 30 to interview CS. ED, TD. ID. EL, ET, AT, and Tl 
graduates. United Technical is an agency which places employees with in- 
dustries at no cost to the employees. Anyone who wants to attend the group 
meeting and to sign up for an interview must contact Mrs. Elmer in the Advise- 
ment Center by this Friday, March 20. 

Tri-M Company, Kennett Square, PA will be interviewing EL & EO 
graduates on campus Wednesday, April 8. Resumes will be collected for 
these interviews until April 1 when they will be sent to the company. 



April 1 is deadline 

to file applications 

for College scholarships 



Applications of the 1987-1988 
Williamsport Area Community College 
Scholarships now are available, accor- 
ding to Donald S. Shade, financial aid 
director. 

Awards of $500 each will be 
made to as many as 20 students, he 
said. 

Shade said he was "encouraging" 
applications from students who are 
planning to return to return next year 
and have already attended at least one 
full semester at the College with a 



grade point average of 3.0 or higher. 

"Candidates must complete a 
scholarship application and include at 
least two letters of recommendation 
from faculty, division directors, 
counselors, or others." he said. 

Applications are available in divi- 
sion offices, in the Learning Resources 
Center, and in the Financial Aid Office. 

Applications as well as letters of 
recommendation must be received by 
April 1 deadline, Shade said. "There 
will be no exceptions," he emphasized. 



Constitution course 

being offered to note 

anniversary year 



As part of the celebration of the 
200th anniversary of the signing of the 
Constitution, a course is being offered 
at the College, entitled "The U.S. Con- 
stitution: A Living Document". 

Dr. Jeannette Fraser, dean of 
educational research, planning, and 
evaluation, will be teaching this one 
credit course. 

According to Dr. Fraser, students 
in the class will be expected to attend 
two evening lectures, seven class 
meetings, participate in discussions, 
and write a log which examines their 
own beliefs, biases, and concerns 
about the constitutional issues examin- 
ed. 

Dr. Fraser said the seminar will 
also examine the anecedents of the 
Constitution and Pennsylvania's role in 
the ratification of the Constitution. The 
impact of social change on the Con- 
stitution will be discussed with em- 
phasis on the role of the Constitution 

'Teaching Adults' 
session set 

Teaching Adults in the Communi- 
ty College, an afternoon series, will 
continue with a presentation this Thurs- 
day, according to Dr. Cynthia N. 
Schloss, coordinator of staff and pro- 
gram development. 

Dr. Schloss said the presentation 
will be held from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in 
Room A121 in the Lifelong Education 
Center. 

The topic of the presentation is 
"Students with Learning Disabilities" 
and will be presented by Judith Smith, 
of The Pennsylvania State University. 



has played in protecting the rights of 
minorities. 

Contemporary constitutional 
issues will be examined through case 
studies, Dr. Fraser said. 



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DU^ECARE 

OFVOUR 

LUNGS. 

THEYHE 

ONLY 

HUMAN. 



I'm not the old Robert 
Klein you know and love. 
I'm the new Robert Klein. 
I gave up smoking and I 
feel like a new man. My 
doctor asked me to take 
a deep breath and I 
vacuumed half his office! 
Seriously, smoking does 
damage your lungs with 
each and every puff. 1 
may be crazy, but I'm not 
crazy enough to keep 
smoking. I quit and so 
can you. You'll see! 



AMERICAN 

LUNG 

ASSOCIATION 



SoSPOTUGHTaMiwdi;, Mink li, IMT 



BULLETIN BOARD 



For week of Monday, March 16 through Sunday, March 22 
MEETINQS 
SGA Executive... 3:30 p.m.. this Thursday. March 19. Room B107, LEC. Of- 
ficers only. 

SGA Senate... 3:30 p.m. tomorrow. Tuesday. March 17. Room B107. LEC. 
Open to all. 

Narcotics Anonymous... every Wednesday, 7 p.m., Room B107. LEC. 
Gamma Epsilon Tau... business meeting every Tuesday from noon to 1 
p.m.. Room B107, LEC. 

Delta Phi Omega... 3 p.m., tomorrow. Tuesday. March 17. Room 103. ACC. 
Multi-Cultural Society.. 3:30 p.m., tomorrow. Tuesday. March 17, Room 
151. LRC. 

S.M.I.L.E. — Single Mates in Lite's Evolution support group meets 11 a.m. 
to noon every Monday in Room B107, Lifelong Education Center. 
SALES, FUND-RAISERS 
Daffodil Sale... SGA will lal<e orders from all campus offices during the 
month of March. Extra flowers will be sold from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Friday. March 
27. ACC lobby. Daffodils are $3 per bunch. All proceeds will benefit the 
American Cancer Society. 

Raffle... sponsored by the Service and Operation of Heavy Equipment 
Association, all day long, this Sunday, March 22, Earth Science Center. Tickets 
are $1 each. 

Toothbrush Trade-in... sponsored by S.A.D.H.A., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., this 
Wednesday. March 18. in front of the Susquehanna Room. The cost per 
toothbrush will be $1 without a trade-in and 50 cents with trade-in. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 
City Bus... Students with validated ID may ride at reduced rates. Info from 
College Activities Office, Gym. 

Swimming... W.AC.C. students who are not members of the YMCA may 
use pool during certain hours; contact College Activities Office for up-to-minute 
listing on hours; $2 per person charge with W.AC.C. ID. 

Movie Tickets... UA movie tickets now available in College Bookstore. $2.75 
each. (Cost increased by 25 cents by UA.) Sponsored by SGA. 

Student Health Services... Room 104, Gym. Registered nurse on duty to 
treat minor illness and refer to physician or facility most capable of providing ad- 
ditional treatment. Hours are 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
ACirVITIES 
Film. , sponsored by SGA, 8 p.m., this Wednesday, March 18, ACC 
Auditorium, Admission Is free to students with ID, $1 without. The film is "The 
Outslders"(rated PG) starring C. Thomas Howell, Matt Dillon, and Ralph Macchio. 
Film... sponsored by SGA, 8 p.m., Wednesday. April 1. ACC Auditorium. 
Admission Is free to students with ID. $1 without. The film will be "Fast Times At 
RIdgemont High" (rated R) starring Sean Penn. 

Maya Angelou... 7 p.m.. next Tuesday, March 24, ACC Auditorium. She will 
deliver a reading/lecture. The reading Is "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". 
Tickets are $2 and available in the Gym, Room 1 08. 

Ravi Shankar .. in concert at 8 p.m.. Friday, April 10, Grace Hall, Lehigh 
University in Bethlehem, Pa. Tickets are $8 for students, $10 and $20 for general 
admission, and $100 for two patron tickets, this includes an invitation to a cham- 
pagne reception with the artists. Tickets are on sale at selected Lehigh Valley 
stores, Tlcketron outlets, and through Teletron. For into students may contact 
the Indian Students Association, Lehigh University Post Ofice, Bethlehem, PA 
1 801 5, telephone (21 5) 758-4974. 

The Williamsport Civic Chorus... presented by the Local Artist Series, 8 to 1 
p.m. Monday, May 18. ACC Auditorium. Ticket price has not been determined. 



SPORTS CARD 



Intramural Softball, .interested 
participants may sign up in the Rec 
Center. Rosters are available and are 
due back today, March 16. Play is 
scheduled to begin the last week of 
March. Practice will be this week on 
the Softball field, located by the 
automotive parking lot. 

Intramural Wrestling 

Tournament. .6 to 8 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday, March 30 and 31 , 
April 1 and 2. Anyone interested in par- 
ticipating may sign up In the Rec 
Center by 6 p.m., Monday, March 30. 

Pool and Dart Tournament.. .7 
p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday, March 
24 and 25, In the Rec Center. There 
will be no Intramural athletics In the 
Gym on these 2 days. 



Indoor tennis. ..at the West Branch 
Racquet Club, Monday through Friday. 
9:30 to 1 1 p.m. at cost of $3 per per- 
son. This rate is for doubles only. 
Validated ID must be shown to receive 
this reduced rate. 

Intramural Athletics. ..Basketball 
playoffs at Drexel University, 1 p.m., 
Saturday, March 21 , 

Intramural Table Tennis Tourna- 
ment... anyone interested in par- 
ticipating in tournament may sign up in 
the Rec Center. The date and time will 
be established after signups are com- 
pleted. 

intramural Badminton Tourna- 
ment... Interested participants may sign 
up In the Rec Center. Dates and times 
are not yet established. 



Lock Haven University Symphony... 8 p.m.. Monday. March 23. ACC 
Auditorium. Sponsored by the Local Artist Series. Admission is free. 

10th Annual Bluegrass Festival... 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 7, Susquehanna 
Room Free to WACC students and staff with ID. No advance ticket sales, pay at 
the door. ^ 

Lecture/Discussion/Brown Bag Luncheon... 1 1 :30 to 1 2:30 p.m.. this Thurs- 
day. March 19. Room 403, ACC. Sponsored by the Women's Forum, 

Communications Club... conference in New York City. March 20 and 21. 
Members will be present from Friday morning to Sunday after- 
noon. 

"The Firebird"... sponsored by the Children's Series, this Saturday. March 
21 at the YWCA, Williamsport at 2 p.m. and at the North Campus at 7 p.m. 

Blizzard of Bucks... 1 :45, tomorrow, March 1 7, Susquehanna Room. Sign up 
to compete by noon tomorrow. Sponsored by the SGA. 
BLOODMOBILE 

Bloodmobile... 9:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday, March 24 
and 25, Main Campus Gym. Sponsored by SGA and the Lycoming County 
Chapter of the American Red Cross. 

BUS TRIPS 

New York City... March 28, the bus leaves the College at 6 a.m. and returns 
leaving NYC at 9 p.m. Transportation costs are $20 for WACC students, 
faculty/staff, and alumni; $22 for the general public. Deadline for reservations is 
today, Monday, March 1 6. 

Washington DC... Saturday, April 1. the bus leaves the College at 6 a.m. 
and returns leaving Washington D.C. at 9 p.m. Transportation costs are $20 for 
WACC students, faculty/staff, and alumni; $22 for the general public. Deadline for 
reservations is Friday, March 27. 

For more info and reservations call 327-4763. Seats are confirmed upon 
payment and money is not refundable. The College Is not responsible for proper- 
ty theft and damage or injury which may occur. 



Cillo's 
College Comer 

PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Third SI. 

(Next to the Academic Center) 

HOURS* 

Men. Ihm Than. 

7:30 t.iB. to i p.m. 

Fridf J, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 



LUNCH SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 

COLD TURKEY & CHEESE 

Whole $2.95 Tax Incl. Reg. $3.25 
Half $1.55 Tax Incl. Reg. $1 .85 

Pl«y LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 

BREAKFASTSPEcSm^i 
THIS WEEK J^ 

CHEESE AND EGG ON MUFFIN 

75* Tax Incl, Reg. $1 .50 




Open House Preview Issue 



WACC ARCHIVES 



SPOTLIGHT 

MoDday. March 23. 1987 • Vol. 22. No. 26 • 8 Pages 
Williamsporl Area Commanity College • WUIiamsport, Pa. 17701 



Thousands expected for Open House 



BIF THE BUNNY 

Having justified his 
visit to the typesetting 
department last week, Bit 
the Bunny - the rascally 
rabbit being raffled by 
The SPOTLIGHT - spent 
some time helping Brenda 
M. VIbert, managing 
editor of the student 
newspaper (the one on 
the left), edit copy. Tickets 
for the stuffed big bunny 
are available from 
SPOTLIGHT members. 
Proceeds will underwrite 
an educational field trip. 




Thousands of visitors were ex- 
pected to be on liand on Sunday for 
the College's annual Open House. 

The occasion usually attracts 
large numbers of family members as 
well as persons simply interested in 
developments at the College. 

This year, among the "changes" 
expected to draw a lot of attention are 
the still-under-construction Advanced 
Technology Center as well as the Pro- 
fessional Development Center. 
Although ingress to neither will be 
possible, both structures have been 
the subject of curiosity and interest, ac- 
cording to College staff involved with 
Open House preparations 

Special Distribution 

The SPOTLIGHT, student 
newspaper of the College pro- 
duced regularly each week, of- 
fered a "preview issue" of tulon- 
day's paper on Sunday to note 
the College's Open House 



Business Education Symposium activities set for next Friday 



The annual Business Education 
Symposium sponsored by the 
Business and Computer Technologies 
Division and the Phi Beta Lambda 
business society will be held Friday, 
April 3, according to (vis. Doreen 
Shope, assistant professor of business. 
New contests added 

High schools from throughout the 
state will be represented among par- 
ticipants in competitions to test 
students' business skills. 



Among contest features will be 
law, sales, word processing, book- 
keeping, computer programming, typ- 
ing, management. 

"The sponsors feel learning can 
be fun," said Gerenza, so "several 
forms of entertainment" are planned. 
Fashion show planned 

A dance and gymnastics 
demonstration will be given by the 
Welteroth Academy Dance Company, 
featuring ballet and jazz routines as 



weil as gymnastics 

Computer games will be 
displayed in one of the computer 
laboratories. Participants will be able to 
test skills at chess, gerbil racing, black- 
jack, flight simulator, and baseball 
among others. 

Ms. Beth Sleboda, fashion expert 
from Ivlansfield University, will 
moderate a seminar, "The Look of 
Success" Focus will be on matching a 
person's wardrobe with complexion. 



body form, and personatity. 
Tours to be given 

A fashion show will be presented 
by students in Ms. Donna Pfeufer's 
visual merchandising and display 
course. The theme is "Hot in the City" 
and summer styles will be shown. 

Throughout the day, campus tours 
will be given. 

Additional information; Ms. 
Doreen Shope, assistant professor of 
business. College Ext. 7529. 




BLUEGRASS IN APRIL 

Leon Morris will be one of the 
featured performers during the Col- 
lege's Bluegrass Festival on Tues- 
day, April 7. [Courtesy photo] 



Johnsonburg's Scott Luhr 
is 'big bucks' winner 

By Margie Flanagan, SPOTLIGHT Staff Writer 

Scott E. Luhr, an electronics operation student from Johnsonburg, was 
the big winner of the Blizzard of Bucks game show last Tuesday, according to 

Ms. Kathy L. Cobb, College activities a ssistant. 

in wind machine 
In the Blizzard of Bucks wind 
machine, Luhr grabbed $132 in cash 
within the 30 seconds provided. He 
had also won $25 during the first 
round as well as a Blizzard of Bucks 
T-shirt. 

Other finalists included Ms. Denise 
Coats, culinary arts student from 
WUIiamsport, and Robert J. Webb, air 
conditioning/refrigeration student from 
Montgomery. Both received $25 in 
cash and a T-shirt. 

Turns down chance 

Webb, as runner-up, was offered a 

chance to enter the wind machine for 

15 seconds in exchange for his $25 

PLEASE TURN TO PAQE 8 



Phi Beta Lambda 

plans to attend 

state conference 

The College's unit of Phi Beta 
Lambda, organization for students in 
business and business-related majors, 
will be represented at the 1 6th annual 
Pennsylvania PBL Leadership Con- 
ference in State College this Friday 
through Sunday, according to Paul W 
Goldfeder, organization adviser 

Several local student members 
will enter accounting and other 
business subject competitions, the ad- 
viser said. 




SYMPHONY TONIGHT 

Dr. Florentino J. Calmi will conduct 
the Lock Haven Symphony Band In a 
performance tonight. Story. Page 3. 
[Courtesy photo] 



iDSPOTUGHTDMondiy. Mwcb 23, 1987 

SPOTLIGHTing.. 



Business & Computer 
Technologies Division 






Mrs. Betty Ayers, division 
secretary. Jersey Shore: / enjoy travel- 
ing; there Is so much to see. I do spend 
a lot of time taking care of our 13-room 
housel 



Dr. Donald B. Bergerstock, direc- 
tor, Business and Computer 
Technologies Division: / like motorcy- 
cle riding, snowmoblling, traveling. 




Donna L. Trimble 
Presentation Coordinator 

Branda M. VIbert 
Information Assistant 

Photos By 

Hazel M. Brungard 

and 

Mary A. Button 



i\ 



Ms, Carol Hill, part-time lab assis- 
Professor Alex W. Bailey, Jersey ,g„, ,q^ typewriting and word process- 
Shore, teaches word processing: / like .^^^ q, ^^^^^ , ,,^g ^^^g^^g cooking, 
restoring antique Corvettes "gopher", and latch rug hooking 

iL I 




l; 



Paul W. Goldleder, assistant pro- 
fessor, Williamsport, teaches manage- 
ment: My hobby is the three R's. 



-VL 



Gary Knebel, trom the "hill coun- 
try" east of Hughesville: / feacrt 
systems analysis, programming 
language, microcomputer applications. 
I am building my house. It's a timber- 
frame construction (like the old barns) 
with BIG beams and posts, held 
together by gravity and wooden pegs. 



Richard Greenly, assistant pro- 
fessor, of Danville, teaches business 
administration, accounting, and 
management subjects: / enjoy golfing, 
gardening, accounting practices and 
community services. 







Phil Landers, associate professor, 
Williamsport, teaches accounting, 
taxes, and finance: / like outdoor 
sports, running, canoeing, cross- 
country skiing, and children. 



Ruth Hameetman, Instructor, Wat- 
sontown, teaches business manage- 
ment, secretarial and accounting: ...My 
hobbies are English riding, horses 
-and Ben, my son. 



I.* 




Denise S. Leete, instructor, com- 
puter science, Williamsport: My special 
interests are skiing, motorcycle riding 




Ruby K Hayes, assistant pro- 
lessor, Williamsport, leaches business 
management and secretarial: / like 
reading, travel, entering contests, and 
attending theater and musical produc- ''^"'^V ^ Mauter, laboratory assls- 

f/ons '^"'' Individualized Learning Center for 

I typewriting: lam from Williamsport and 

I tike reading, crocheting, and swimm- 
ing (summer). 
NOTE ' 

In keeping with our goal of "learning by doing", students involved with 
The SPOTLIGHT are given opportunity to plan and complete projects relative 
to mass communications. Selections for the SPOTLIGHTing Series are done 
by chance drawing; once the challenge is before the student, he or she and the 
team is charged with carrying on - adjusting to and solving problems along the 
way. -Tony Cillo. adviser. 




Gloria H. Valenik, secretary to the 
division director. Business and Com- 
puter Technologies, of Jersey Shore: / 
enjoy collecting and refinishing anti- 
ques and cooking. 



John W. Miller, instructor, com- 
puter science, Jersey Shore: / like 
woodworking and reading. 



o 




Donna G. Pfeufer, instructor, 
retail management, small business 
and economics: I'm from fvfontoursville 
and I like camping, skiing, wagon train 
trips and small business. 



9 



Jane Loren Scheffey, assistant 
professor, Williamsport: / teach 
secretarial classes. I play golf and ten- 
nis in the summer and go cross- 
country skiing during the winter mon- 
ths. 




Doreen W. Shope, assistant pro- 
fessor, Hughesville: / teach business 
management/secretarial. I like travel- 
ing. Count Nicholas Alexander von 
Kat, gardening, and baking. 




Ronald L. Rock, professor, 
Williamsport: / teach accounting and I 
like gardening, jogging, hunting, and 
fishing. 



Bonnie R. Taylor, associate pro-, 
fessor, Montgomery: / teach business 
administration, secretarial skills, 
medical secretarial skills. I spend a lot 
of time with my daughter and help her 
and her friends by serving as 
cheerleader adviser for Pop Warner 
Football and elementary wrestling 
cheerleaders. 



Ray Tyler, associate professor, 
Williamsport: / (each business manage- 
ment. M'y hobby Is music - classical to 
Dixieland to jazz rock. (I am a former 
member of the Harrlsburg Symphony 
Orchestra). 




Constance M. Vitolins, evening 
school coordinator/Computer Lab, 
Cogan Station: / enjoy hunting, fishing, 
and cooking (eating). 



Area Community Cotlege 

Office Room 7, Academic Centef, 10( 
WlDlamsport. Pa 17701 TelephOfie (717)3 



Patricia J. Shoff, associate pro- 
fessor of business administration, 
Williamsport: / (each word process- 
ing/secretarial. I enjoy reading, sewing, 
crewel, walking, and traveling. 



^ k 



reason AH lellers musi be 


signed; signatures musi be aumerv 






published «imo., me w-tter 


sf«me. 


Brand* M. VltM 




Donna M. TrimbI* 


. Photography Editor 




ualnaaa/Advartlalng Managar 


Catfi»riM A. Hann 








Margaral Flaniean • StaH Wrilar 


Jamaa Oa 








Tlmolhy N«l(llo • 




^n Campanalll > 


Builnaaa/Advortlilng SlaH 


Mark Monlacalvo 


• Aaaoclata Compoaltor 


Tony Rita • P 


oductlon Staff A.«Kl.t. 



SPOTUGHTDMondiy, March 23, IMToJ 

Angelou performance to be given tomorrow 



Maya Angelou. singer-dancer- 
aclress-writer, will appear for a 
reading-performance at 7 p.m. tomor- 
row in the Academic Center 
Auditorium, according to Ms. Veronica 
M. Muzic. professor of English. 

Following the reading- 
performance, an author's reception will 
be held in the College Library. Ms. 
Angelou will autograph books which 
will be available for purchase. Light 
refreshments will be served. 
Began in 'Frisco 

Ms. Angelou began her career as 
a singer and dancer in San Francisco, 
but later went to New York. She starred 
in "Porgy and Bess" during a U.S. 
State Department tour through Europe 
and Africa. 

She also was part of the original 
case of Genet's "Blacks", Ms. Muzic 
noted. 

'Firebird' 
puppet sliow 
tliis Saturday 

"Firebird" will be presented by the 
Puppet Factory this Saturday at two 
locations, according to Ms. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

"Fireblrd"will be at the 
Williamsport YWCA at 2 p.m. and at 
the North Campus at 7 p.m. 

The performance is part of the 
Collean'.<% Chilrirfin's Serin*; — which is 
sponsored by the College (North Cam 
pus and Multi-Cultural Society), by the 
Williamsport YWCA, and the Greater 
Williamsport Community Arts Council. 

The series is supported by a grant 
from the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania Council on the Arts and the 
Williamsport Foundation. 

Tickets are $2. 

Information and tickets: 
Telephone (717) 327-4763, or send a 
check with name, address, and 
telephone number to W.A.C.C. College 
Activities, Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College, 1005 W. Third St., 
Williamsport, Pa. 17701-5799. 

"Firebird" is a Russian tale which 
presents the Firebird as a symbol of 
happiness which has been banished 
from the land by a wicked tzar. 
Everyone, except a servant girl, seems 
to have fallen under the tzar's "evil 
spell". The girl. In the tale, must find a 
way to defeat the tzar and bring back 
the Firebird. 

'Stress & Learning' 
is Thursday's topic 

Teaching Adults in the Communi- 
ty College, an afternoon series, will 
continue its presentations this Thurs- 
day, according to Dr. Cynthia N. 
Schloss, coordinator of staff and pro- 
gram development. 

Dr. Schloss said the presentation 
will be from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Room 
A1 21 of the Lifelong Education Center. 

The topic of the presentation is 
"Stress and learning" and will be given 
by Robert Meacham, a licensed 
psychologist of psychological and 
counseling services in Williamsport. 



M. Angelou wrote "Georgia, 
Georgia", the '.': original script by a 
black woman to be produced for televi- 
sion. She also wrote "Sister, Sister", a 
television feature film aired on the USA 
Network this past January. 

Ms. Angelou also held a suppor- 
ting role in "Roots". 

Worl(ed with civil rights 
Early in her career, Ms. Angelou 
was politically active as northern coor- 
dinator of the Southern Christian 
Leadership Conference- 
She worked with Dr. Martin Luther 
King Jr., civil rights activist, and with 
Malcolm X, black militant leader. In col- 



loboration with Godfrey Cambridge, 
she wrote "Cabaret for Freedom", a 
fundraiser for civil rights. 

Tickets in Gym-108 

Ms. Angelou wrote five 
autobiographical books: / Know Why 
the Caged Bird Sings. Gather Together 
in My Name. Swingin' & Singin' & Get- 
tin' Merry Liite Christmas, The Heart of 
a Woman, and All God's Children 
Need Traveling Shoes. 

According to Ms. Muzic, Ms. 
Angelou spent time in Ghana. Africa, 
where she was an administrator at the 
University of Ghana and taught in the 
School of Drama. 



Lock Haven Symphonic Band 
presentation is tonigiit 

The Lock Haven University Symphonic Band will perform in the 
Academic Center Auditorium at 7:30 this evening, according to Ms. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, College activities coordinator. 

The presentation is free to students, faculty, and staff of the Community 
College, she said. It is part of the College's Local Artist Series. 

The evening's performance will include contemporary and classical 
music. 

The band is conducted by Dr. Florentine J. Caimi. He was appointed to 
the LHU music faculty in April 1974. He previously was in music education in 
Jersey Shore, in Muncy, and at Penn State. 

SPORTS CARD 



She also engaged in journalistic 
efforts while there, including work as a 
reporter for the Ghanian Times and as 
editor for the African Review. She also 
wrote for Radio Ghana. 

Ms. Muzic pointed out that Ms. 
Angelou is a member of the Harlem 
Writers' Guild where she interacted 
with some of our most prominent black 
literary figures including James 
Baldwin, Paule Marshall, and John 
Killens. 

Tickets for the reading/lecture are 
$2 and are available in Room 108, 
Gym. 

Ms. Angelou's presentation is part 
of the Women's Series being spon- 
sored by the College, the College 
Bookstore, the Multi-Cultural Society, 
and the Women's Forum, Ms Muzic 
said. 



Softball. .play will begin the last 
week of March. Sign up in the Rec 
Center. Rosters are available and due 
back by today. March 23. 

Indoor tennis... at the West Branch 
Racquet Club, Monday through Friday, 
9:30 to 1 1 p.m. at cost of $3 per per- 
son. This rate is for doubles only. 
Validated ID must be shown to receive 
this reduced rate. 

Intramural Wrestling 

Tournament. .6 to 8 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday, March 30 and 31, 
April 1 and 2. Anyone interested in par- 
ticipating may sign up in the Rec 
Center by 6 p.m., Monday, March 30. 

Pool and Dart Tournament.. .7 
p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday, March 
24 and 25, in the Rec Center. There 
will be no intramural athletics in the 
Gym on these 2 days. 

Intramural Table Tennis Tourna- 
ment. ..anyone interested in par- 
ticipating in tournament may sign up in 

Navy now offering 
aviation cadet 



the Rec Center. The date and time will 
be established after signups are com- 
pleted. 

Intramural Badminton Tourna- 
ment... interested participants may sign 
up in the Rec Center. Dates and times 
are not yet established. 



New course about 

Indians 
to be offered in Fall 

A new three credit cc^rse entitled 
"American Indian Perspectives" will 
be offered next semester by Ned S. 
Coates, assistant professor of English. 

Coates said the class will be held 
Tuesday evenings from 7 to 9:45 p.m. 

According to Coates, the course 
will examine how American Indians 
who are influenced by "traditional" In- 
dian beliefs look at modern America. 

Coates said that films and discus- 
sions will outnumber lectures, and 
students wi\t be encouraged to be part 
of the group while pursuing individual 
interests. 



program 



A new naval aviation cadet pro- 
gram has recently been detailed by the 
Navy, according to Lawrence W. 
Emery Jr., director of advisement and 
career services. 

The new program is for graduates 
of any associate degree program or a 
student who has earned 60 credits. It is 
designed to prepare the person to be a 
Navy pilot or Navy flight officer. 

The program, Emery said, is open 
to persons at least 1 9 but not over 24 
years old prior to entering training. 



VOTER REGISTRATION DRIVE 

This Wednesday, March 25 
9 A.M. to 2 P.M. 



Lifelong Education Center 
Outside Susquehanna Room 

Sponsored by SGA 
Conducted by Lycoming County League of Women Voters 



Don't Miss The Chance 

To Vote 
in the May 19 Primary! 



4D$POTUGHTDMon(li;, Mireh 13, I9S7 



Weight reduction: tliere are ciioices 



Wrlt1«n and •ubmltted In rftcognltlon of National Nutrition Month 

By Tina Handrlclts, of Milton, and Bridget Banholomaw, ol Soutfi Wllllamaport 

Botti diatotic studanta 

Sorina is iust around the corner and it will be linne to aet out vour stiorts 
and battling suits once again. But before you consider a fad diet to lose ttiose 
extra pounds you niay tiave gained during ttie winter monttis. remember some 
of ttie guidelines for safe weight reduction, 

1 , An intake of 1 200 calories a day for women and 1 600 calories a day for 
men are the lowest recommended amounts. Anything below these limits 
means it will be almost impossible to get all the nutrients your body needs, 

2 To figure your ideal body weight if you are female, calculate 100 
pounds for the first five feet of your height. Then add five pounds for every ad- 
ditional inch of height, 

finales should calculate 1 06 pounds for the first five feet of height. Add six 
pounds for every additional inch of height. 



3, A sound weight loss of no more than two pounds per week is recom- 
mended. Trying to lose at a faster rate creates a starvation metabolism which 
could mean one would end up gaining more weight on less food, 

4, Exercise is very important when considering losing weiaht. It innrfia.>!fi.<i 
the body's metabolism while toning muscles. You may actually look thinner 
even if you don't lose weight because flabbiness is reduced. Walking is 
especially good. It's a moderate exercise that everyone can do and it burns 
150 calories per half hour, 

5, Eating three meals a day from the four food groups is ideal. Breakfast is 
the most important meal. Proteins consumed in this meal help build muscles, 
decrease accumulation of fat and water, plus they help decrease the craving 
for sweet carbohydrates the rest of the day 

A light lunch, and a small dinner in the early evening distributes calories 
when they'll be used for energy and not stored as adipose tissue. When one 
feels the urge to eat between meals, raw vegetables and fresh fruit are good. 



Jazz is not dead... Ferguson proves it 



Jazz is not dead, it just smells funny. But as was evinced last Saturday 
night, it is being permutated and performed under a moniker not familiar to 
many of today's music conscious youth, a relatively obscure yet not unplea- 
sant mixture of varying musical influences including mainstream jazz, pro- 
gressive rock, big band, be-bop, and latin percussive. Commonly referred to in 
the music field as "Fusion". This style is being performed by an increasing 
number of artists in today's music industry. 

tvlaynard Ferguson is one of the lop performers of "fusion" today. His 
flamboyant stage theatrics and unmitigated mastery of the trumpet is the driv- 
ing force of, and the model for, his band. High Voltage To watch this band in 
action is not to witness a futility of reckless indifference, a form which increas- 
ingly becomes the bent of many of today's bands that continually perform, but 
a study of some of the most committed, structurally spotless technicians in the 
field of music Constant time signature changes underscored by polyrhythms 
aplenty lend to the music a quality and bigness that just cannot be imagined 
without being in front ol the band and seeing the work being performed. The 
feel of the rumbling bass, the air-shattering blasts of the horns, the concussion 
of the drummer's attack, and the heady nuances suggested as much by what 
is not played as by what is. 

Creativity abounds in each Individual of the band. Each Is encouraged to 
experiment with material in every conceivable manner, and they do; The per- 
cussionist has assembled an array of Instruments to compliment the ensem- 
ble's music from five continents, as much pieces of art in themselves as the ar- 
tistry commanded to play them; the kit-drummer's set-up, a Yamaha synthesiz- 
ed concept kit, is the very latest in the electronic end of the spectrum, a unit 
whose utilization leaves the drummer wanting for no sound of effect; the 
keyboardist puts into use three computer contolled boards and a series of 
electronic and acoustic keyboards. Throughout the evening these boards 



were heard mimicking the drumkit and, in return, the drumkit mimicking the 
boards. The bassist's maneuverable bass lines carried the music form the mo- 
ment the band started, finessing the band, and most noticeably the saxophone 
player,., into sporadic fits of what seemed to be chaotic bleating, but what, to 
discerning ears, proved to be quite carefully orchestrated movements well 
undercurrented by the rest of the band. The lead guitarist's precision handling 
of his instrument leaves a lot unsaid. Here is where was felt the predominating 
jazz lines, snaking through the lower chord progressions and spirting into the 
highest ranges with freightful clarity. 

And topping the bill is. of course. Maynard Ferguson, "boss" to the band 
and immediate crew. Versatile, talented, ebullient, dynamic, changing, 
a consummate entertainer ana a consistant perfectionist. While these adjec- 
tives in no way exhust the man's curriculum, they sufficiently indicate his 
character. This virtuoso trumpeter has been playing and perfoming for more 
than forty years and has gained the admiration and respect of musicians 
throughout the globe. His playing of the half-dozen horns used in the perfor- 
mance was impeccable. As one of the band would solo, Ferguson would walk 
backstage and from the wings could be seen cheering the soloist on, nodding 
at him and injecting the music with an off-beat body twitch or a fully syn- 
copated kick. 

When Ferguson solos, well that's his job, and he works at it with an 
ungovernable fury that might be expected from the members of the band that 
are half his age. Tirelessly blasting out "gonna fly now", written for the first 
"Rocky" movie, or carefully meandering his band through another infectious 
trip to "Birdland", it stands as no wonder why all the praise and renown have 
been heaped upon this man for decades, a man and his music that have not 
stagnated into fragmented standards, but have progressed with a passionate, 
frenzied zeal, into one of the freshest and flawlessly vibrant entertainment acts 
touring the countries today. 



JobOps. 



Employment Spring Graduates 

Keystone Veneers, P, 0, Box 
3455, Williamsport, Pa, would like 
resumes from electrical occupations 
graduates for industrial maintenance. 
Send to Dean Ripley, personnel 
manager 

Newport News Shipbuilding, 
Newport News, Va, is collecting 
resumes in anticipation of openings in 
computer aided dralting and design, 
Ivlore information is available in the Ad- 
visement Center, 

Techniserv, P. O. Box 282, Ber- 
wick, Pa 1 81 03. has an opening for an 
ET or EL graduate. They work with 
electrical and electronic control 
systems, building control panels, etc. 
Ivlore information available in the Ad- 
visement Center. Send a resume to 
Paul Heaps, president. 

Robert Johnson Plumbing and 
Heating Co.. P.O Box 986, Lewistown, 
Pa 17044 would like resumes from 
refrigeration and air conditioning 



graduates from Ivlifflin and Juniata 
Counties for installation and service of 
commercial heating and air condition- 
ing equipment. Send to the attention of 
James Johnson, 

Central Penn Printing Co,, 1 505 N. 
Atherton St., State College, Pa, 16803 
has an opening for a press operator. 
Send a resume to Mr. Dreibelbis, 

Excello Corp,, Route 11 & Wood- 
bine Lane, Danville, Pa, 17821 has an 
opening for a tool design technology or 
an engineering drafting technology 
graduate. Could start part-time im- 
mediately. Send a resume to Joe 
Banik, production process engineer. 



[Information supplied by College 
__A(jvisement & Career Services direc- 
tor. Inquiries should be directed to him ~ 
in his office in the Learning Resources 
Center.] 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Lady Luck Chimney Sweeps, RD 
2, Box 271, Ivluncy, Pa. 17756, needs 
someone to rebuild and lay up 
chimneys. Call Cathy or Luann at (71 7) 
546-5290 for more information. 

White Deer Drug & AlcoholCenter, 
Box 97, Allenwood, pa. 17810, has 
two part-time clerical positions open. A 
requirement is being able to type 55 
words a minute. One person would 
work 1 30 to 10 p.m. three days a 
week. Two of those days being 
weekends every other week. The other 
opening is 8:30 a.m, to 5 p.m. three 
days a week, one weekend a month. 
Send a letter of application or resume 
to the personnel coordinator. 



Campus Recruiting 

Ivlanpower Technical, Elmira, N.Y. 
will be interviewing on campus on April 
23. They are interested in AT, CT, CS, 
ED, EL, ET, MG, TT, ID, Tl, and TD 
graduates. Sign up with Ivlrs. Elmer in 
the Advisement Center before April 
1 0, They hire people with technical 
degrees for entry-level placements in 
the Southern Tier area of New York 
State, 

Link Belt Drive Division of P. T, 
Components from Philadelphia will in- 
terview machine tool technology 
graduates on campus if there is 
enough interest. Bring a resume to 
Ivlrs. Elmer in the Advisement Center 
by April 3 if you would like an inter- 
view. 

PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 6 



DONATE BLOOD 



SPOniGHTDMOTdaj, Mirch 23, 1987n5 





Hi, Mom! Hi, Dad! 



Here's some of the things 
we were up to this year... 

From SPOTLIGHT files.. 




6aSPOTLIGHTDMoiiiUr, M>rch U, 1987 



The PDC: 

'...the fact 

that 

students 

put it up 

is 

impressive...' 




The Professional Development Center, a community conference building 
designed and built by WAC.C students, was "officially" opened Sunday, 
Marcti 1 . 

Ttie building, immediately south of the Lifelong Education Center (LEC), 
was constructed wllh the work of more than 2,000 students over the past three 
years. 

The building - 9,807 square feet - was designed by three architectural 
students: Christopher J. Mitchell, Joanne M. Wagner, and Warner M. Claytor 
Jr. They were under the guidance of Joseph G. Mark, associate professor oi 
architectural technology. 

Previously, six homes were built In the community by students and then 
sold - but this is the first on-campus building to be designed by students. 

"If we seem very proud, it's because we are very proud," said College 
president Dr. Robert L. Breuder. "This facility will stand as a permanent 
testimonial to the quality ol instruction we offer here at the College " 

Students enrolled in construction technology programs did the actual con- 
struction work. Dr. Ralph A Home, director of the Construction Technologies 
Division, Fred W. Dochter, construction coordinator, and members of the divi- 
sion faculty supervised and provided on-site instruction during construction. 

In conjunction with the overall project, natural resources management 
students enrolled in landscaping and in heavy equipment operation classes did 
earthmoving tasks and developed a landscape scheme for the area outside 
the building. 

Dr. Wayne R, Longbrake, director of the Natural Resources Management 
Division, and his faculty, supervised this part of the project. 



Top karate man 
to be here 
for clinic 

Master TeruyukI Okazaki, one of 
the top karate men in the world, will 
visit The Willliamsport Area Communi- 
ty College for a training clinic and pro- 
motion examination on March 27 at 
7:00 p.m. Master Okazaki is the se- 
cond ranking member in the world tor 
the Japan Karate Asssoclatlon and Is 
also the Chief Instructor of the Interna- 
tional Shotokan Karate Federation 
which boasts a membership ol nearly 
50,000 students throughout North and 
Central America. ' 

George Vance, Instructor tor the ,._,„ ,. y, ,„„ „,y„ 

Lycoming Shotokan Karate Club, and team series flag goes to Team 4 Sum- 

Margot Bayer, Evening Activities Col- mers and Speck 1 100 
lege Assistant lor The Williamsport High individual series for the cur 

Area Community College, are respon- rent week was by Brian Speck, 61 9 
qhLln '°°'*"^''"9 'f^e event. Second high series, Mike Yanni 

Shotokan karate students from The 595 

rj)^!r"'°A'^'''^°'^'""""y^°"«9e' High individual singles, Briar 

Lycoming College. Penn State Univer- Speck 251 

lunZ^lf^''^^^^:^""^'^^'^^"^^"^^ Second singles, Donald Balliet, 

will laKe part in the clinic. 234 



The building was constructed at a cost of approximately $650,000. Its 
value at this time, however, is estimated to be In excess of M million. Funds for 
the project came from the City of Williamsport, which provided a $100,000 
"seed grant", from the state, and private sector contributions. In all, 45 
businesses, agencies, and corporations donated money, equipment, supplies, 
or In-kind services in support of the building project. 

Designed specifically to serve as a conference center, the Professional 
Development Center includes five meeting rooms and has both teleconferenc- 
ing and microcomputer features. Not only offering sophistication in 
technology, the Center highlights the talent and beauty of the area by featuring 
in its rooms details of the Lumber Era boom wood (over 100 years old) from 
the Susquehanna River as well as original works of local artists. 

When asked of his reaction to the Center, John D. Brockway, general 
manager of the Sunday GRIT, said, "Courageous is the best work I can think 
bl... The fact that students put it up is Impressive." 

Said Lori M. Weir, social reporter for the Milton Standard and a graduate 
of the College: "It's beautiful. I'm really impressed. It's something that the 
school and the community can be proud of." 

The College will use the Professional Development Center for seminars, 
conferences and other human resource development activities. 

Local organizations, such as the Chamber of Commerce, will be invited to 
use the facility for similar presentations. 

Dr. Breuder also commented, "We believe this Center is such a fine ex- 
ample of craftsmanship that it will serve as a signal to those outside the region 
- especially those business and industry leaders who might be considering 
relocating to the area - that the Williamsport area has a lot to offer." 



Keglers tally ties 
for top team spot 

Information supplied '-^st week's results were reported 

by ABC Bowling Unas managamani by the Lanes, but a mechanical oro- 

Two teams are^n a tie situation for blem at The SPOTLIGHT caused them 
. , ,- .u. to be omitted. They are: 

High team series, Summers- 
Speck, 1037. 

High individual series, Mike Yanni 
563. 

Second, Brian Speck, 539. 
High single, Mike YHanni, 205. 
Second high single, Mike Yanni 
205. 



the first place team honors in 
W.A.C.C. afternoon bowling league at 
the ABC Lanes. 

As of Thursday last, with 1 3 wins 
and 8 losses each, the teams of Dalton 
and Flanagan and of Summers and 
Speck were tied. 

The week previous, the Dalton- 
Flanagan team was first, with 12 wins 
and 6 losses. 

In the recent recording, the high 









^t^'i' 



-^we 



:>o'^^ 



-^'"^ 



Job Ops 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4 



United Technical Associates, Inc.. 
from Harrisburg and Reading will be ori 
campus next Monday, March 30 to in- 
terview CS, ED, TD. ID. EL, ET, AT, & 
Tl graduates. United Technical is an 
agency which places employes with in- 
dustries at no cost to the employe. 
Anyone who would like to attend the 
group meeting and to sign up for an in- 
terview should see Mrs. Elmer in the 
Advisement Center Immediately. 

Tri-M Company, Kennett Square, 
Pa. will be interviewing EL and ED 
graduates on campus on Wednesday, 
April 8. Resumes will be collected for 
these inteviews until next Wednesday 
April 1 when they will be sent to the 
company. 

Aspiundh, Ouakertown, Pa. will be 
interviewing forestry graduates at the 
Earth Science Campus on Tuesday, 
April 14. Interested students should 
sign up with Mr. Nibert before this Fri- 
day, March 27. 



SPOTUGHTaMoutar, Mink 13, miQ? 



ACROSS 


46 Leveret 


13 


Gumbo ingredient 






1/ 


Hove sideways 


1 Naval academy 


48 Part of BHOC 


H) 


Give support 


student 


49 Surfeit 


n 


Certain cocktail 


7 Argentine port 


51 India 


?5 


Jock 


14 Cooking ingredien 


t 53 Strengthened by 


26 


league 


15 Structural pecul 


ar- heating 


27 


Sound of a drunkard 


ity in horses, e 


c. 55 Peruvian mammal 


m 


Like some cars 


16 Evaluate 


57 Type of clam 


10 


Way of conducting 


17 Hot day 


58 New York island 




oneself 


18 Surpass 


59 Certain singing 


32 


Repay an injury 


19 Most weird 


groups 


31 




21 Pitcher's statis 


ic 60 Host sensible 


34 


Cry 


11 For fear that 




36 


Small dwelling 


24 Probability 




38 


Lunar sights 


25 Mornings 




19 


Gruesome 


26 Shot of liquor 


I Defensive ditch 


411 


Befuddled 


27 Sinli the putt 


2 Rudeness 


42 


Ski lodge 


(2 wds.) 


3 Got rid of 


44 


French relative 


29 Boundless 


4 Lady deer 


45 


Building wing 


31 Violent woman 


5 Small map within 


4/ 


Airline company 




a larger one 


48 


Part of Einstein's 


36 Curtis • 


6 To be: Lat. 




equation 


37 Financial defense 


7 Hoved like a 


49 


Identical 


mechanism 


hairline 


5U 


Russian news 


38 Hiss Colbert 


8 City in Michigan 




agency 


41 Form a hard 


9 Spanish painter 


52 


Genran philosopher 


coating 


10 Quite old (abbr. 


54 


What trenchermen 


43 Groundkeeper's a 


d 11 Sew again 




can do 


ea mercl ess y 


12 Cool drinks 


56 


Search for gold 



Cathy's Diner 

1170 W. 4lh St. • Williamsport, Pa. 17701 • Phone 323-3224 







3 


4 


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6 


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Puzzle Answer Elsewhere This Page 



SCHOLARSHIP OFFERED TO STUDENTS 
OF CYPRIOT AND GREEK ORIGIN 

The Financial Aid Office has information about a scholarship being of- 
fered by the Mal<arios Scholarship Fund Committee, according to Donald S. 
Shade, director of financial aid. 

The director said the scholarship is being given to students of Cypriot or 
Greek origin who will be either enrolled for the 1 987-1 988 academic year or 
who now are enrolled. 

The amount of the scholarship is $1 ,000 for one year. 

Applications must be submitted to the committee In New York City by 
May 1. 

ATTENTION NUTRITION CONNOISSEURS! 

Human Services Club is at it again - Another food sale! On this Wednes- 
day, March 25. Same tinne. same place, but with more veggies and dip and 
turkey and lixin's and goodies galore. So don't eat nuttin' that day until we see 
you in the ACC Lobby between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.! 

-Bernadine Carr, Human Services Club Executive Committee secretary, 
from South Williamsport. 

SPOTLIGHT Courtesy Announcement 



im 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 
DAILY SPECIALS 

Hours: Moo,-S>l. II a,tii. lo 9 p.ni. Closed Sundiy 



Monday 


Regular Sub 


Whole 


$1.70 


Cosmo 


$2.10 


Tuesday 


Meatball 


Whole 


$1.85 


Cosmo 


$2.30 


Wednesday 


Turkey 


Whole 


$1.50 


Cosmo 


$1.95 


Thursday 


Ham 


Whole 


$1.90 


Cosmo 


$2.35 


Friday 


Tuna 


Whole 


$1.80 


Cosmo 


$2.25 


Saturday 


Cheese Steak 


Whole 


$2,50 


Cosmo 


$2.95 



•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 

•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" 

$4 20 WHOLE $2 10 HALF 



Faculty member training 
Emporium company's employes 

Contributed by Ms, Emily M, Reed, program assistant 
Center for Business and Industrial Advancement 

Ray Tyler, associate professor of business administration, is training 
employes of Pennsylvania Pressed Metals of Emporium in new skills which 
will help the company remain competitive with foreign industry. 

Pennsylvania Pressed Metals, a metal parts manufacturer, recently pur- 
chased an IBM System/38 management information systems in order to con- 
vert its present processing system into a stale-ol-the-art materials processing 
plan. 

To maximize use of the system, 

the company determined that 

employees must be computer literate 

and able to operate the software in- 
cluded in the new production system. 

Through a Customized Job Training 

grant secured by the Center for 

Business and Industrial Advancement 

a retraining program was developed 

which would allow the company to 

meet new technology challenges 

without replacing its existing 

workforce. 

Mr. Tyler's involvement began 

with his attendance at a seminar in 

Chicago where the communications 

process that defines how to suc- 
cessfully manage a manufacturing 

company, called Business Re- 
quirements Planning, was taught. With 

this specialized training to complement 

his business administration and 

teaching experience, Mr. Tyler was 

well prepared to instruct Pennsylvania 

Pressed Metals employes In the BRP 

system and its practical applications. 
This is not the first time Mr. Tyler 

has assisted In providing educational 

opportunities for business and Industry 

In the community. In the past he has 

been a part of projects involving Divine 

Providence Hospital, Jersey Shore 

Hospital, Williamsport National Bank 
and Avco. 



Ms. Muzic chosen 
discussion leader 

Courtesy College Information Office 

Ms. Veronica L. Muzic, professor 
of English, has been selected to serve 
as a discussion leader in the Penrv 
sylvania Humanities Council's reading 
and discussion programs In women's 
studies. 

Ms. Muzic has led a number of 
women's studies classes at the Col- 
lege. 

Presently, she is instructing a 
"Wnter and Her Works" class featuring 
the works of four contemporary 
women writers. A class on "Women in 
Literature" will be offered during the 
Fall semester. 



QOLF CLUBS FOR SALE 
Wooda, Irons, bag. Call 323-3988 aHer 8 
1. to talk price, fadvr; 



PROJECTOR FOR SALE 
35mm slide projector, good condition, 
all 323-38S8 after 8 p.m. to talk price, fadv' ; 



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SaSPOTUGHTDMondw, Much 13. 19«7 

Next Wednesday is deadline 
for scholarship applications 

Submitted by Donald S. Shad*, fininclal aid director 
Taxt la praaented aa prepared by Itte writer 

Students are reminded Ifial applications for 1 987-1 988 Williamsporl Area 
Community College Scholarstiips are due in trie Financial Aid Office by next 
Wednesday, April 1 

To date, less than 20 completed applications have been received. Since 
20 awards will be made, eligible applicants wfio complete the application pro- 
cess by the deadline will tiave a very good chance of receiving one of these 
$500 awards. 

Application forms are available in division offices. In the Learning 
Resources Center, and in the Financial Aid Office. 

Anyone with questions about the scholarship program or the application 
process should contact the Financial Aid Office in Room 201, Academic 
Center. 

Candidates must submit a completed application form and at least two let- 
ters of recommendation. Applications or letters received after the due date will 
not be considered. 



Bulletin Board 

Week of Monday, March 23. through Sunday. March 29 



WOMEN'S FORUM BROWN BAG LUNCH 

Panel discussion: LEGAL ISSUES ol interest to the separated, 
divorced, single parent population JANICE HAMBRIDGE, public 
defender. GEORGE PRICE. Family Court hearing office, and BARB 
WILLIAMSON, domestic relations, are volunteering their time. Let's en- 
courage them with our attendance on next Thursday. April 2. from 1 1 .30 
am to 12:30 p.m . Room 403. Academic Center. (Credit lor S.M.t.L.E. 
participants.) Everyone Is welcomel 

SPOTLIGHT Courtesy Announcement 



Cillo's 


LUNCH SPECIAL 


College Corner 

PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Third SI. 

(Next lo the Acidemic Center) 


THIS WEEK 

COLD TURKEY SUB 

Whole $2.40 Tax IncI Reg, $2 70 
Hall $1.20 Tax IncI Reg $1 50 

Pl«y LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 


HOURS* 

Mon. thru Than. 
7:30 «.iD. to 6 p.m. ^AM 
Fridi;, 7:30 i.m. to 4 p.m. 


BREAKFAST SPECIAL 

• CHEESE • EGG on MUFFIN 

$1.35 Tax IncI 
Reg 11 65 



Corner of 3rcl and Maynard Sts. 

BENSON 



ALWAYS OPEN ■ 
ALL NIQHT, 



HOLIDAYS, 
AND SUNDAYS 




MEETINGS 

SGA Executive... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 24, Room B1 07, 
LEG. 

Narcotics Anonymous... every Wednesday, 7 p.m., Room B107. LEG. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... business meeting every Tuesday, noon to 1 p.m.. 
Room B107. LEG, 

Delta Phi Omega... 3 p.m.. tomorrow, Tuesday, Ivlarch 24, Room 103, 
AGG. 

Multi-Cultural Society... 3:30 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 24, Room 
151, LRC. 

S.M.I.L.E. ... (Single Males in Life's Evolution) support group meets 11 
a.m. to noon every Monday, Room 8107, LEG. 

Human Services Club... 3:30 p.m., this Thursday, March 26, Room 219, 
AGG. 

SALES, FUND-RAISERS 

Daffodil Sale... SGA will take orders from all campus offices during this 
month. Extra flowers will be sold from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. this Friday,, March 27, 
AGG Lobby. Daffodils are $3 per bunch. All proceeds benefit American 
Cancer Society. 

Giant Stuffed Bunny Raffle. , , sponsored by The SPOTLIGHT. Tickets now 
on sale through Saturday, April 4. Tickets available from any SPOTLIGHT 
member or in Room 7, basement, AGG. 

Food Sale/Easter Basket Raffle... sponsored by the Human Services Club, 
8 a.m. to ? this Wednesday, March 25, AGG Lobby. Sale of tickets will start at 
beginning of food sale and the drawing will be after the sale. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

City bus... Students with validated ID ride at reduced rates. Info: College 
Activities Office, Gym. 

Swimming... W.A.C.G. students who are not members of YMCA may use 
pool during certain hours. Contact College Activities Office for hours. $2 per 
person charge with ID. 

Movie tickets... UA movie tickets available. College Bookstore, $2.75 
each; SGA sponsored. 

Student Health Services... Room 104, Gym. Registered nurse on duty; 
minor illnesses and/or reference. Hours are 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. 

ACTIVITIES 

Maya Angelou... 7 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 24, AGG Auditorium, 
reading/lecture. Tickets: $2; Room 108, Gym. 

Symphony... Lock Haven Univeristy Symphony, 8 p.m., tonight, Monday, 
March 23, ACC Auditorium. Free admission. 

BLOODMOBILE 

Bloodmobile... 9:45 a.m. lo3:45 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 24, and 
Wednesday, March 25, Gym. 

BUS TRIP 

New York City... this Saturday, March 28, departs 6 a.m., leaves NYC at 9 
p.m. Info: College Activities Office. 

Johnsonburg's Scott Luhr 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

prize money. He turned it down. 

Other contestants, eliminated at 
various points of time during the show, 
were: 

Matthew L. Mitchell, culinary arts 
student from Weilsboro; Joe G 
Leichtenberger, civil engineering 
technology student from Sheffield. 

Also, Brian A, Burk, construction 
carpentry student from Wiliiamsport; 
Michael T. Banzhaf, culinary arts stu- 
dent from Wiliiamsport. 

And, David A. Golver, construc- 



tion carpentry student from Easton; Ed- 
ward M. Wlllix. printing student from 
Burlington Flats. 

And, Christie L. Fisher, word pro- 
cessing student from Wiliiamsport, and 
Michael W. Hillman, electronics 
technology student from WilliamsporL 

Each received a T-shirt. 

The "Wizzard of Blizzard" game 
show host, Paul Adams, performed for 
an audience of about 400, The show 
was sponsored by the College's Stu- 
dent Government Association, 



rnTjEUNECHEF 



'^ACC AR^,y. 



State official, anchorman here for Symposium 



The annual Business Education 
Symposium sponsored by the 
Business and Computer Technologies 
Division and the Phi Beta Lambda 
business society will be held Friday, 
according to Greg E. Gerenza, instruc- 
tor ot computer science. 



The symposium will end at 3 p.m. 
with an awards ceremony; winning 
students will receive trophies. Trophies 
will be presented by Ms, Clara Lee 
Gaston, vocational business education 
adviser of the Pennsylvania Depart- 
ment of Education, and Gary Essex, 



anchorman for WYOU-TV news, 
Gerenza said. 

According to Gerenza, Ms. 
Gaston will be representing Gov. Bob 
Casey in the presentation. 

Essex is a television news per- 
sonality and a news commentator at 



WYOU-TV in northeast Pennsylvania, 
Gerenza said, "Essex has been involv- 
ed with TV communication for many 
years and is reknowned as one of the 
top news commentators in the eastern 
United States." 

(Ratated story, Paga 8] 



Monday, March 30, 1987 • Vol, 22, No. 27 

8 Pages 

Wllllamsport Area Community College 

Wllllamsport, Pa. 17701 




STUDENTS 
IN ACTION 

Amy E. Watkins, 
upper left, 
a high school 
student from Water- 
ville, w/orks with 
C,E,N.O. [Story, 
Page 7] 

April Stine (left) 
and Angle Zeyn, both 
high school students 
from Loyalsock Twp. 
[upper right] also 
take part in C.E.N.O. 

Bruno E. Mahonski, 
of Williamsport, 
[at bottom right] 
doesn't seem to mind 
hemoglobin test 
before giving blood. 
[Bloodmobile story 
Page 5.] 



^^.^Sl^miimm ^k0 .nrnM^ 



laSPOTUGHTDMondiy, Mircb 30, 1M7 

Novelist to give 
lecture/reading 
next Friday 

Novelist Lyne Sharon Schwartz 
will give a reading/lecture and a 
workshop next Friday. April 1 at the 
College, according to Ms. JoAnn R 
Fremiotti, coordinator of college ac- 
tivities. 

The workshop, pertaining to 
Schwartz's work, will be held In the 
Professional Developnnent Center at 
10 am. There is no admission fee for 
the workshop, but pre-registration is re- 
quired, according to Ms. Fremiotti. 

Schwartz's reading/lecture will be 
held in the Academic Center 
Auditorium at 7 p.m. It is entitled. 
"Reading From Current and In- 
Progress Fiction." 

Tickets for the reading /lecture 
and the reception which follows are $2. 
according to Ms. Fremiotti. Admission 
Is free to College students and staff 
with a valid ID. 

The reception will be held in the 
College Library following the 
reading/lecture. Schwartz will be 
available to autograph copies of her 
books at this time. 

Lynne Sharon Schwartz is an 
editor translator, public relations writer, 
and recipient of the Guggenheim 
Fellowship. 

She has taught at Hunter College. 
New Youk University, Iowa Writers 
Workshop. Columbia, and Boston 




AFTER THE PERFORMANCE - Maya Angelou, writer- Academic Center Auditorium was packed for her 

lecturer who was well received on campus last week, presentation. Wexf wee/r. The SPOTLIGHT will present 

autographed books In the College Library. The additional student commentary. 

Review/dinner 



I Iniuorpi^)! . 

Schwartz is the author of a short 
story collection. "Acquainted With the 
Night", and the novels. "Rough Strife". 
"Balancing Acts", and "Disturbances 
in the Field". 

Schwartz's appearances at the 
College are part of the Women's Series 
being sponsored by the College, the 
Women's Forum, the Multi-Cultural 
Society, the College Bookstore, the 
Williamsport YWCA. the Greater 
Williamsport Community Arts Council, 
and B&S Picture Frames, 

Tickets or Information: 
717-327-4763. Ext. 7269. or the 
YWCA at 717-322-4637 Or send 
check with name, address, and 
telephone number to College Activities 
at the Williamsport Area Community 
College. 1005 W, Third St. 
Williamsport. PA 17810-5799. 



to be Tuesday 

A book review/dinner reviewing 
novelist Lynne Sharon Schwartz's 
book. "Disturbances in the Field" will 



Chef, according to Ms. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotti, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities. 

Ms. Fremiotti said the book review 
will start at 5 p.m.. and the dinner is 
scheduled to start at 5;45 p.m. 

There is no admission fee for the 
book review, but preregistration is re- 
quired. 

The dinner is $6 and reservations 
are required at least one week in ad- 
vance. 

The book review/dinner is part of 
the Women's Series and is sponsored 
by the College, the Women's Forum. 
the Multi-Cultural Society, the 
Williamsport YWCA, the Greater 
Williamsport Community Arts Council, 
and B&S Picture Frames, according to 
Ms. Fremiotti. 

Information: College Activities Of- 
fice at 717-327-4763. Ext. 7269. 



Monday, March 30, 1»B7 * Vol. 22, No. 27 

Itwi SPOruGHT II cMMM .Kh Mood., i.,omir.j ol m. 




This Week is Your LAST CHANCE to buy a 
ticl<et for ttie Giant Bunny Raffle... See Any 
SPOTLIGHT member. Ticket sales are limited; 
odds are good. Drawing is next (Monday. 



gPOTLIGHTOMoiita;, Mirth M, 1M7DJ 



ACROSS 

1 Amulet 

6 Class bottle 
11 Skull 
13 Station 

15 Emit rays 

16 Making sense 

17 Tally 

18 Libraries and t 

20 Hood sorrel 

21 gin 

23 Item for Julia 
Child 

24 Type of cheese 

25 Prefix for gran 
graph 

27 "A Majority of 

28 La Scala offer 

29 Roasting pin 
31 Uithstands 

33 Accelerate 

34 Sot's ailment, 
short 

35 Wrench 
39 Herons 

42 Units of verse 
measurement 

43 Bungle 
45 Accustom 


47 Actor Jannings 10 Afternoon server 

48 Arose (2wds.) 

50 Spanish river 11 1929 occurrence 

51 Records, for short 12 Adviser 

52 Graduates 13 Ingenious 

54 Storage place 14 Relatives of the 

55 Adding machine, for camel 

one 19 Corleone 

57 Art product 22 Everlasting 
anks 59 Improve in 24 Incident 

appearance 26 Buck 

60 Puts a picture up 28 Rome's ancient port 

again 30 "All About " 

6f French legislative 32 Mr. Byrnes 
body 35 Refines metal 
or 62 Johnny Mercer's 36 Majorette's items 
subject 37 Barley's beards 

" 38 Tennis play 

ng DOWN J9 Presser 
40 Labeling 

1 Baby beds 41 Hot . Arkansas 

2 Food fish 44 Like Caesar (abbr.) 
for 3 Black cuckoo 46 Ice device 

4 Money of Iran 48 Driving hazard 

5 Muffles 49 Tropical fruit 

6 Task 52 Calgary's province 

7 Joplin pieces (abbr.) 

8 Prefix for cycle 53 Reverberate 

9 Works with secret 56 Scottish tree 
messages 58 Chinese dynasty 






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1170 W. 4lh St 


Cathy's Diner 

• WUIiamsporl, Pa. 17701 * Phone 323-3224 


■r 








■ 










■ 


Puzzle Answer on Page 6 





Annual welding contest held on cannpus 



Report prepared by 

Mark Cunningham 
welding student from Cogan Station 

The annual welding contest was 
held March 24 in the welding depart- 
ment section of the Avco Metal Trades 
Center. 

This event is sponsored jointly by 
the North Central Section ot the 
American Welding Society and by 
High Steel Structures Inc., a local steel 
fabricating industry. 

In cooperation with Dick Hess, a 
supervisor at High Steel, they provided 
the material for the contest as well as 
two judges - R. Theodore Peet and 
Ivliles Oehrii, who are also co-chairmen 
of the local unit of the American 
Welding Society. 



Liquid Carbonic provided the 
welding electrodes used in the contest. 

The contest is divided into two 
categories: Private sector, postsecon- 
dary and secondary vocational pro- 
gram. 

The post secondary category had 
22 contestants: all fourth semester 
welding students from W.A.C.C. They 
a.'e David Campbell, Dwayne Corter. 
Ivlark Cunningham. Doug Doian. Mike 
Fitting, Steve Fultz, Ralph Goodison, 
Lee Gunter, Jeff Haight, Kurt Hart. 
Mark Lehman, Nathan Main. Ken 
Maione. Mark Miller. Vic Morrei. Mat 
Nolan, Al Reber. Kevin Shilling. Dan 
Smithmyer. Shawn Steffee, Jeff Tudor, 
and Jon Vavala. 

The second category is the secon- 




dary vocational program. A total of 48 
contestants were entered from three 
different schools. Eighteen were from 
Sun VoTech. 12 from Columbia Mon- 
tour and 1 7 from the W.A.C.C. secon- 
dary program. They were; Dan 
Wesneski. Joe Reynolds, Robert 
Paramentier. Tony Dincher. Mike 
Knarr, Jay Alexander, Jeff Horn. Mark 
JoWn, Greg Moreheart, Bruce Knull, 
Mike Allen, Eric Glace, Dave Goodby. 
Rod Lorson, Steve Tressler, Eugene 
Williamson and Clayton Merrill. 

The winners of both categories 
will be honored guests of the North 
Central Section of American Welding 
Society along with their instructors and 
parents at the annual meeting and ban- 
quet to be held at Le Jeune Chef. 
Wednesday. April 8. at 7 p.m. 



Tell... SGA! 

Room A138-LEC 

or 

Call Ext. 7248 



Panel to discuss 
alcohol, drugs 
on Thursday 

Teaching Adults in the Communi- 
ty College, an afternoon series, will 
feature a panel discussion this Thurs- 
day. In Room At 25 ot the Ufelong 
Education Center from 3:30 to 5 p.m.. 
according to Dr. Cynthia N. Schloss. 
coordinator of staff and program 
development. 

The discussion is entitled, 
"Alcohol and Drugs and How They 
Relate to Learning." 

The session chairperson will be 
Jacquelynne Ellis. R.N., associate pro- 
fessor of practical nursing at the Col- 
lege. 

According to Dr. Schloss, the 
panel will consist of Dr William J. Mar- 
tin, dean of student services at the Col- 
lege; Dr, Larry Greenfield, director of 
alcoholism-chemical dependency 
detoxification services and associate 
in the department of general internal 
medicine at Geisinger Medical 
Center; Jacqueline Saliade. an educa- 
tional psychologist from Lewisburg, 
and Brett Feese. district attorney for 
Lycoming County. 



p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ ^ h i| 

SHIEE PlIIAr 



Buy emy size Little Caesars 
Origineil round pizza at reguleir 
price, get the identical pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 




W.A.C.C. itidMli UTt 
•ddilloiul Ifh only wItt 
ilidcnl I.D. ud lUa id. 



One coupon per customer. Carry out only Al participating locations. 



4a$l>0TUGHTaM0Ddi;, Mtrtb 30, 1987 

Bluegrass 
Festival's 
next week 



The 10th Annual Bluegrass 
Festival will be held next Tuesday, 
April 7 at 7:30 p.m. in the Susquehan- 
na Room, according to Ms. JoAnn R. 
Fremiotll, coordinator of College ac- 
tivities, 

Ms, Fremiotti said the Bluegrass 
Festival will feature The Bluegrass 
Foure and Leon Morris and 
Associates. 

Tickets are $2 for the general 
public, and admission is free for Col- 
lege students and staff with a valid ID, 
according to Ms. Fremiotti. 



Ms. Fremiotti added that there will 
be no advanced ticket sales. 

This event is sponsored by the 
College, and is suppported from a 
grant from the Commonwealth of Pen- 
nsylvania Council on the Arts and the 
Williamsport Recreation Commission. 

Leon Morris will be one of the 
featured performers during the Col- 
lege's Bluegrass Festival on Tues- 
day, April 7. [Courtesy photo] 



BURQER KINQ awards are given annually on the basis 
of academic achievement and Individual contributions 
In the food and hospitality program. Standing from left 
are Ray M. Stabblns, restaurant manager of the 
Maynard Street Burger King; Helen J. Hughes, dietetic 






Welcome College Students 

Court & Willow Cafe 

326 Court Street 

322-0135 

Lunch • 

Dinner • 

Sunday Brunch (10:00-2.00) 

Imported Beer 

Deli Sandwiches & Salads 

Gourmet Soups • 

Homemade Desserts • 

20% Discount with I.D. 

■ Good thru March 30, 1987 



Two days left to file 
scholarship applications 

Only two days remain before the deadline for tiling applica- 
tions for the 1987-88 College scholarship program for students 
returning in the Fall. 

The deadline Is this Wednesday. 

According to Donald S. Shade, director of financial aid, up 
to 20 awards of $500 each will be made to returning students 
on the basis of academic achievement and other criteria. 

Applicants for the scholarship program must complete the 
application form and submit at least two letters of recommen- 
dation. 

Applications for the program are available In each division 
office, Ir the Learning Resources Center, and In the Financial 
Aid Office. 



Open 'til mldnlto dally 

BARRY'S 

BROOKLYN STYLE 
EATERY 

"Save-A-Buck Specials 



Across fiom College's East Parking Lot 
234 PARK STREET 
PHONE 323-3663 




ROOMS 
FOR RENT 





technician student from Turbotvllle who Is one of the 
award recipients; Michelle D. Seville, first assistant 
manager of the Maynard Street Burger King, and Terry 
L. Ottenmiller, food and hospitality student from 
Wiiiiamsport who Is the other award recipient. 



Friday, May 1 
s deadline 
for aid requests 

The deadline to file applications 
for financial aid is Friday, May 1 , accor- 
ding to Donald S. Shade, director of 
financial aid. 

Shade said he is reminding 
students to mail their applications im- 
mediately to receive consideration for 
every aid program available. 

Students who applied tor aid for 
the current year should have received 
an application in the mail, but should 
pick one up in the Financial Aid Office 
if they have not yet received one. 

Shade said any student needing 
aid applications or having questions 
about completion of the forms should 
visit the Financial Aid Office in Room 
201 in the Academic Center. 

Award possible 
for future math 
or science 
teachers 

students interested in pursuing a 
career as a math or science teacher in 
Pennsylvania may qualify for a 
Scholars in Education Award, accor- 
ding to Donald S. Shade, director of 
financial aid. 

Shade said he would like to re- 
mind students that the deadline to app- 
ly for the award is May 1 , 1 987. 

Eligibility for this award program is 
based on academic achievement In 
college coursework, college board 
scores, and other similar criteria. 

Shade said that through this pro- 
gram, students can receive awards 
ranging from $1 ,500 up to 50 percent 
of tuition per year. 



««** 






c,'?0,o<^°^ 



SPOTLIGHTOMondiy, March 30, I987d5 



Three hundred and fifty-seven 
pints of blood were collected last 
Tuesday and Wednesday, March 24 
and 25, during the Red Cross Blood- 
mobile visit at the College's Main 
Campus, according to Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit, College nurse. 

On Tuesday 192 persons 



volunteered donations and 1 75 pints 
were accepted. On Wednesday, 194 
volunteers showed up and 1 82 pints 
were collected. 

The Bloodmobile visit was spon- 
sored by the Student Government 
Association and the Lycoming Coun- 
ty Chapter of the American Red 
Cross. 




Bloodmobile 
nets 357 pints 



GETTING CHECKED - Mrs. 
Nancy Fernandez, a Blood- 
mobile volunteer, takes blood 
pressure of Anne E. Eck, a 
Transportation Technologies 
Division staff member, during 
Bloodmobile visit. 




.,.And 



WHAT DOES YOUR FUTURE HOLD? 

•Challenge 
•Excitement 
•Satisfaction 
•Adventure 
Nursing Has All This... 

So Much More! 



If you want a Nursing Career 

in your future, 

Stop Today at ACC-240 

For More Details on How to Get Started 




6dSPOTUGBTDMoi4i;, Muck 30, IMT 





CHOW TIME - Bernadlne E. 
Carr, of South Willlamsport, 
and Sharon A. Ooebler, of Lock 
Haven, survey the goodies as 
Karen A. Helminlak of 
Willlamsport, and Ann M. 
Bozyk, of Willlamsport, serve at 
club's fund-raiser food sale last 
week. The members Intend to 
use money to have an Easter 
party for the aging. 



Top year for nominations: 35 'Award' bids submitted 



"This Is the best year we ever 
had," said Dr. Robert G. Bowers, ex- 
ecutive assistant ot internal affairs. 
about the nominations for the 
Distinguished Teachers Awards. 

Teachers from every division, in- 
cluding secondary subdivisions, were 
nominated. Nominated were 35 
teachers by 49 students and six non- 
students, Dr. Bowers said. 



The selection committee will nar- 
row the 35 nominations to three-one 
Master Teacher Award and two Ex- 
cellence in Teaching Awards. 

Dr. Bowers said a person sub- 
miting a nomination should not be 
discouraged if the person he or she 
nominated is not selected. That person 
may be nominated again next year. 

According to Dr. Bowers, the 



awards will be announced at com- 
mencement on May 9. Winners will 
receive public recognition and a pla- 
que plus a monetary award of $1 .000 
for the Master Teacher Award and 



$500 for the Excellence in Teaching 
Awards. 

Dr. Bowers said he is "elated" 
over the number of nominations receiv- 
ed this year. 




GET 

THE 

JUMP 

ON FALL... 

CALL Roan Realty now! 

7 Single Rooms for Female Students 
Now Available for Fall Semester 

Brand New! 

Completely Remodeled 

Reasonably Priced 

Owner Pays All Utilities 

Deposit & Leases Required 

Beat the Rush! CALL NOW! 

Roan Realty I717] 326-7509 



SCHOLARSHIP OFFERED TO STUDENTS 
OF CYPRIOT AND GREEK ORIGIN 

The Financial Aid Office has information about a scholarship being of- 
fered by the Ivlakarios Scholarship Fund Committee, according to Donald S. 
Shade, director of financial aid. 

The director said the scholarship is being given to students of Cypriot or 
Greek origin who will be either enrolled for the 1987-1988 academic year or 
who now are enrolled. 

T, e amount of the scholarship is $1 ,000 for one year. 

Applications must be submitted to the committee in New York City by 
May 1 . 

Speck, Balliet chalk up high 
singles marks at ABC 



During the week's bowling at ABC 
Bowling Lanes, high singles status was 
made by Brian Speck with 193 and 
Donald Balliet with 191. 

The high series scorers were 
Brian Speck with 541 and Mike Yanni 
with 520. 



Start your day off 
rigfit with breakfast at Le- 
Jeune Chef. Open 
Wednesday, April 1, from 
7:15 to 8:30. 

Breakfast specials 
include pecan pancakes 
and a potato and cheese 
omelet. 

Other original 
breakfast foods are also 
available. 

Georgiann Coleman 

Culinary arts student 

from Castanea 

SPOTLIGHT Counesy Announcement 



Winning the high team series were 
Rich Dalton and Dan Flanagan with 
1015. 

Taking first place team honors 
was team number four, Todd Summers 
and Brian Speck, with 1 5 wins and nine 
losses. 



PROJECTOR FOR SALE 
3Smm slide projector, good condition, 
all 323-3988 after 8 p.m. to talk price, [advl.] 

GOLF CLUBS FOR SALE 
Woods, Irons, bag. Call 323-3988 after 8 
.m. to talk price, [advtj 



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SPOTLIGHTDMoDiUr, Much 3», IMTD? 



C.E.N.O. 

offers 

'hands-on' 

experience 



A special report by 
Sharon Hltesman 
Coordinator, C.E.N.O. 

Career Exploration in Nontradilional Occupa- 
tions, C.E.N.O., offers fiands-on experiences as part 
of the program's services. 

Hands-on are offered in nontraditional shop 
areas. The term nontraditional refers to areas for 
females that have been traditionally termed "male 
occupations" - such as auto mechanics, carpentry, 
drafting, engineering and welding, 

Nontradilional occupations for males include 
those areas that females have dominated - such as 
dental hygiene, floriculture, nursing, secretarial 
science, and word processing. 

The hands-on experiences are the second 
phase of the C.E.N.O. program. Participants must 




HOW TO CORRECTLY measure and draw rules (lines) 
Mrs. Barbara Williams to Deniss M. Poust. 



Is being shown by Instructor 




BLOOD TESTING provided a chance for hands-on experience for IHontoursville High 
School students during a Career Exploration In Nontraditional Occupations session 
Pictured are Curtis L. Newman, Timothy J. Alkey, Kevin H. Adams, Daniel D. Fahien 
Lonnle W. Schultz, Rodney M. Winter, Craig A. Gobernath, and David J. Biczewsld. Ms! 
Janet A. Barbour, health instructor, conducted the session. 



first attend C.E.N.O. seminars during which they take 
interest and ability tests. Upon completion of the 
tests, participants are helped to highlight a nontradi- 
tional area ot Interest or ability. 

Participants then are invited to spend time in a 
hands-on shop area which parallels their interests 
and/or aptitudes. 

Through the C.E.N.O. program, participants ex- 
plore sex role stereotyping and the limitations 
stereotyping has placed upon the occupational 
choices that individuals are willing to consider. 

Seminar activities encourage participants to ex- 
plore all career options and not just those that have 
been explored based on traditional stereotypes. 

Anyone interested in further information or 
seminar registration should contact Sharon 
Hltesman, coordinator, at Ext. 7249 or Sharon 
Doebler, program assistant, extension 7552. 



Peter Pan Flying High this Saturday 



"Peter Pan" will be presented by 
Duet Productions this Saturday, April 
4, according to Ms. Jo Ann Fremiotti, 
coordinator of College activities. 

"Peter Pan" will be at two loca- 
tions, the Willlamsport Young 
Women's Christian Association YWCA 
at 2 p.m. and the North Campus at 7 
p.m. 

"Peter Pan" is the beloved tale of 
the boy who never grew up. Along with 



his friend TInkerbell, Peter Pan leads 
the way to excitement and adventure 
for Wendy and her brothers. On their 
Journey to Nevernever Land, they 
meet such characters as Captain 
Hook, Tiger Lily and the lost boys. 

This presentation of "Peter Pan" is 
performed entirely by two actors play- 
ing multiple characters. This perfor- 
mance uses simple settings and quick 



costume changes to key the imagina- 
tions of the audience. 

The performance is part of the 
College's Children's Senes-which is 
sponsored by the College (North Cam- 
pus and Multi-Cultural Society), by the 
Willlamsport YWCA, and the Greater 
Williamsport Community Arts Council. 

The series is supported by a grant 
from the Commonwealth of Penn- 



sylvania Council on the Arts and the 

Williamsport Foundation. 
Tickets are $2, 

For information and tickets: 
Telephone (71 7) 327-4763, or send a 
check with name, address, and 
telephone number to W. AC.C. College 
Activities, Williamsport Area Com- 
munity College, 1005 W. Third St. 
Williamsport, PA 17701-5799 



Don't Miss The Chance 



Vote 
in the May 19 Primary! 



SoSPOTLIGHTDMondiy, Mareb 30, 1M7 

Phi Beta Lambda members 
involved witli Symposium 



The Phi Beta Lambda organization 
is making plans to gather gift pacl<ets 
for high school students attending the 
f 3th Annual Bsuiness education Sym- 
posium this Friday, according to Paul 
W. Goldfeder, state PBL adviser and 
adviser to the campus unit. 

PBL is co-sponsoring the event 
with the Business and Computer 
Technologies Division. The event was 
originated by the PBL organization 1 3 
years ago. Goldfeder said 



PBL members will assist proctors 
in giving tests. 

According to Goldfeder. Dr. 
Robert L Breuder, College president, 
and Dr Donald B, Bergerstock. direc- 
tor of Business and Computer 
Technologies Division, will address the 
visiting students. 

Martin T Green, PBL president 
who is business management student 
from Bayonne. N.J. will give a 
welcoming speech. 




Eric Krise, an 
electronic oc- 
cupations stu- 
dent trom Can- 
ton, won first 
place In a 
district VICA 
competition In 
Industrial wir- 
ing. "States" 
competition 
will be held In 
Lancaster In 
the upcoming 
month. 



Pennsylvania Lottery 



BENSON 



► 



^ 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



ALWAYS OPEN 
ALL NIGHT 



.-'k-O- V 



HOLIDAYS 
AND SUNDAYS 





POTATO CHIPS 



PRETZELS 



LEC 



Bulletin Board 

MEETINGS 

SGA Executive. .3:30 p m , tomorrow. Tuesday, March 31. Room B107, 

Narcotics Anonymous. ..every Wednesday, 7 p.m.. Room 8107. LEC. 

Gamma Epsilon Tau... business meeting every Tuesday, noon to 1 p.m., 
Room B107. LEC. 

Delta Phi Omega. .3 p.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, March 31, Room 103, 
ACC 

S.M. I. L.E.... (Single Mates in Life's Evolution) support group meets 1 1 a.m. 
to noon every Monday, Room B1 07, LEC 

SALES, FUND-RAISERS 
Giant Stuffed Bunny Raffle... sponsored by the SPOTLIGHT. Tickets now 
available through Saturday, April 4. Tickets available from any SPOTLIGHT 
member or in Room 7, basement, ACC. 

ACTIVITIES 

Movie... sponsored by SGA, 8 p.m., this Wednesday, April 1, ACC 
Auditorium. The movie is "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" (rated R), starring 
Sean Penn. 

Film, .sponsored by the Film Society, 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., this Thursday, 
April 2, ACC Auditorium. Free with ID prices vary for the public. 

Film Show. ..sponsored by the Film Society, 8 to 10 p.m., this Friday, April 
3, ACC Auditorium. 

"The Apple Tree". ..rehearsal tomorrow, March 31 , from 7:30 to 10 p.m., 
ACC Auditorium. 

Peter Pan... sponsored by the Children's Series, this Saturday April 4. 2 
p.m. at the Williamsport Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) and 7 
p.m. at the North Campus. 

Field Trip.. Anthropology SOC 1 1 2 Class, to Philadelphia on this Saturday 
April 4. 



SPORTS CARD 



Intramural Athletic Softball. ..March 23 was the first date to play. Any team 
that was a no-show will be eliminated. Schedules are located on the bulletin 
boards outside the Rec Center and gym. 

Intramural Table Tennis Tournament... anyone interested in participating 
in tournament may sign up in the Rec Center. 

Indoor tennis. ..at the West Branch Racquet Club, Monday through Friday, 
9:30 to 11 p.m. at cost of $3 per person. This rate is for doubles only. 
Validated ID must be shown to receive this reduced rate. 

Intramural Wrestling Tournament.. .6 to 8 p.m., Monday through Thurs- 
day, March 30 and 31 , April 1 and 2. Anyone interested in participating may 
sign up in the Rec Center by 6 p.m., Monday, March 30. 



Ballet here 
in April 

A performance by the Wilkes- 
Barre Ballet Theatre Company will be 
given at 7:30 p.m.. Saturday, April 25, 
according to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, 
College activities coordinator. 

The performance is sponsored by 
the College, the Young Women's 
Christian Association, and the Greater 
Williamsport Area Arts Council. It will 
be in the Academic Center Auditorium. 

Special workshops will be held. 
Workshops for children will be from 1 
to 1 :30 p.m. Master class (dance stu- 
dent and teachers) will be from 1 :30 to 
3 p.m., Ms. Fremiotti said. 

The workshops will be in the 
YWCA the same day. Free preregistra- 
tion is required. 

Also being held are be auditions 
for the Wilkes-Barre Ballet Theatre 
Company The auditions are open to 
anyone interested. 

Tickets tor the performance are $3 
for children under 1 2 and $5 dollars for 
others. 

Tickets are available in Room 1 08, 
Gym, the Williamsport YWCA, B&S 
Picture Frames, Inc., Caboose 
Restaurant, and Cheers, Williamsport, 
and from the Lexicon Bookstore in 
Lewisburg. For further information call 
327-4763, Ext. 7269 or 322-4637. 



Cillo's 
College Corner 

BREAKFAST SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 

STEAK •CHEESE 
•EGG •SUB 

$1.50 Taxincl. 
Reg $1 80 

LUNCH SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 

PEPPERONI & CHEESE 

Half $1.65 Tax Inci Reg J1 96 

Play LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 

HOURS 
Mon. thru Than. 
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

'PHONE 322-1321 

|llOO W. Third St. 

(Next to the Academic Center) 



WACC ARCHIVES 




Monday, AprIM 3, 1987 • Vol. 22, No. 29 • 24 Pages 
Wllllamsport Area Community College • Wllllamsport, Pa. 17701 

Yes, We Know: It's May 9th! 



PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 3 




WINNER of the 1987 Pennsylvania 
Nurserymen's Association Scholarship 
Award Is Gary R. Brungard, second- 
year landscape/nursery technology stu- 



dent from Wllllamsport. Making the 
presentation Is Richard J. Wellmlnster 
(left), associate professor of hor- 
ticulture. 



Landscape/nursery students 
earn first place at field day 



PLEASE TURN TO PAGES 21 and 22 



2aSPOTLIGHTnMonday, April 13, 1987 



Chorus to be presented 
next month 



The Willlamsport Civic Chorus will 
present a concert at the College on 
Monday. May 18, at 8 p.m. in the 
Academic Center Auditorium, accor- 
ding to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 



The theme of the concert is "Kern 
to Bernstein". 

Tickets are available at Robert M. 
Sides Pianos and Organs, Otto's 
Bookstore, Room 108 in the Gym, and 
at the door. 



4-year-old wins 'Bif 
and 'Bif is off to Florida! 

Justin Lee Anderson. 4, son of Tracey and Steve 
Anderson, of Belle Glade, Fla. is the happy winner of "Bif, 
the Bunny". 

"Bif, a five-foot stuffed bunny, was given away in a 
raffle conducted by The SPOTLIGHT as a fund-raiser for a 
field trip. 

The bunny is scheduled to leave for Florida this 
weekend, according to Justin's grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Trimble, of Cogan Station. Mrs. Trimble - Donna - 
is an individual studies student at the College and 
photographer for The SPOTLIGHT. 




TAKE CARE 
OF YOUR 
LUNGS. 

THEYHE 

ONLY 

HUMAN. 



AMERICAN 

LUNG 

ASSOCIATION 



T CONTRIBUTIONS 



the SPOTLIGHT o 



Timothy Ncldlfl • Produ 
Mark Mont*calva • Auoclit* Composllor 



Tony All* • Production 



SPOTLIQHTDMonday, April 13. 1987d3 



Commencement is May 9 

Commencement is Saturday, May 9. Last week's edition carried several 
articles about commencement with the correct date. However, a headline 
carried an incorrect date. 

Commencement apparel available 

starting next Monday; 

also available on "the day" 

Commencement apparel will be available at the College Bookstore beginning next Mon- 
day. April 20, according to Mrs. Eleanore R. Holcomb, Bookstore supervisor. 

Student caps and gowns are priced at $1 3 95 and associate hoods are $1 1 .80. There Is 
no charge for collars for girls. Caps and lassies may be purchased separately: $4.75 for 
caps and $3.50 for tassles. 

Mrs. Holcomb said the Bookstore will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Commence- 
ment Day, Saturday, May 9, Commencement apparel will be available at that time. 

Sign up for Commencement 

students planning to participate In Commencement on Saturday. May 9, 
must sign up in Room 157, Learning Resources Center (LRC), 
emphasized Mrs. Matilda S. Elmer, secretary to the director of experiential 
learning career services. 

The sign-up period ends Wednesday, April 22. 



Parking tickets must be paid 
before semester ends 

Student transcripts of work at the College will be withheld from any stu- 
dent who fails to pay his or her parking ticket fines, Cecil C. Cryder, supervisor 
of security, said at week's end. 

Those who have not yet paid the fines should make arrangements as 
soon as possible, he emphasized. 

Cryder added, "Students should not ignore the fines... They don't just 'go 
away'; unpaid tickets will double the amount of the original fee - putting an ad- 
ditional demand on the student." 

Deadline for paying parking fines Is Wednesday, April 29 - two days 
before the last day of classes for the year. 



4oSPOTLIQHTDMonday, April 13, 1987 





BRENDA VIBERT 
MANAGING EDITOR 



DONNA TRIMBLE 
PHOTO EDITOR 



Pictured are stan members who have 
contributed to The SPOTLIGHT regularly 
this year. Pictures were not available tor 
staff artist Jim Doan, for compositor Mark 
Montecalvo, and production assistant 
Tony Rife. 





MARGIE FLANAGAN 
STAFF WRITER 



RUTH ANN HIXSON 
STAFF WRITER 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, April 13, 1987C 5 





MARY BUTTON 
PHOTOGRAPHER 



MIKE WALDRON 
AD MANAGER 




CATHY HANNON 
STAFF WRITER 



ELEANOR PLEASANT HAZEL BRUNGARD 

STAFF AIDE DARKROOM ASSISTANT 



BoSPOTLIGHTDMonday, April 13, 1987 



SPORTS CARD 



Intramural Table Tertnis Tournamer)! . date arid time not yet established. The tourna- 
ment will have three divisions: Male, female, and coed: singles and doubles 

Badminton Tournament... at the end of April. Times and dates not yet established 
Three divisions: Mate, lemale. and coed: singles and doubles. 

Intramural Soltball... now in progress on the athletic Held by the Automotive parking lot. 
Spectators welcome. Schedules are posted on the Bulletin Board outside the Recreation 
Center and in the Gym Lobby. Games that are rained out will be rescheduled lor the follow- 
ing weel< 

Recreation Week... scheduled for next Monday. April 20 through Thursday, April 23. 
Activities will include team lug ol war, team or individual obstacle course, team or individual 
bike ride, team or individual Iriathalons, and more. 

Students may direct questions to Ms. Margot Bayor. Hours are Monday through 
Thursday, 1:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Friday, 8 a.m. to noon. 




SPOTLIGHTDMonday, April 13, 1987d7 



Welders awards night held 



Raporl ContrlbutMJ 
By Wdding Faculty 

[Ths report is published as presented by tt)e 
welding faculty Because ot a camera malfunction, 
pfiotos taken at ttie event could not be used.] 

The North Central Section of the 
American Weiding Society held its 23rd 
annual awards night last Wednesday in Le 
Jeune Chef to give recognition to the win- 
ners In the welding contest held here on 
Iwlarch 24. 

There were 22 participants from the 
postsecondary welding program 
(W.A.C.C.) and 44 participants from three 
secondary (high school) vocational 
school programs. Of the latter, 18 were 
from WACO, 1 1 were from Sun Vo-Tech, 
and 1 2 were from Columbia Vo-Tech. 

The postsecondary winners are: 

lvlarl< Lehman, of York Springs, first. 

Allen Reber, of Minersvllle, second. 

Shawn Steffee, of Homer City, third. 

Ralph Goodison, of Sunbury RD 2, 
fourth. 

Steve Fultz, of Williamsport, fifth. 



SME to meet 

this evening; 

place changed 

A meeting of Chapter 49, Society of 
N/lanufacturing Engineers, will be held at 
6:30 this evening at the Quality Inn, Route 
1 5, South Williamsport. 

The place represents a location 
change from a previous announcement, 
according to Lawrence H. Graczyk, assis- 
tant professor, machine shop. 

Dinner will be served at 6:30. A 
business meeting will follow. 

Highlighting the evening will be a 
presentation by Larry Seibert. manufactur- 
ing engineer. He will give background in- 
formation about his company, 
Keeler/Dorr-Oliver Boiler Company. 

After that, the chapter members will 
be given a guided tour of the facilities. 

Keeler/Dorr-Oliver uses CAD and is 
involved in high pressure boiler research 
in addition to boiler production. 



The secondary vocational winners 
are: 

fvlike Allen, of Jersey Shore, 
W.A.C.C, first. 

Robert Buckles, of Snydertown, Sun 
Vo-Tech, second. 

Eugene Williamson, ot Jersey Shore, 
W.A.C.C. third. 

Rodney Lorson, of Jersey Shore, 
W.A.C.C, fourth. 

Clayton Ivlerrill, of (wlontoursville, 
W.A.C.C, fifth. 

Each student who placed first 
through fifth was presented a plaque and 
other recognition. 

"We are thanking the American 
Welding Society." said Paul S. Schriner, 
associate professor of welding, "as well 
as local industries and supply houses for 
their great support in our annual contest." 



Sponsored 



TODAY! 

Monday, April 13 



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7 SALE AT TWO SPOTS 

The Sale will be in the ACC 
E Lobby and in the LEG Lobby out- 
o- side the Susquehanna Roonn. 



^ Information supplied by Gail Finnerty. Club presi- 
dent and food and hospitality student from 
O Johnstown 



Prices range from 25< to $10 



• HoiviEiviADE Candy 



8cSPOTLIGHT3Monday, April 13, 1987 






,A' 



tve'® 



In keeping with its goal to Involve more students In the 
production of their student newspaper, The SPOTLIGHT 
has encouraged contributions. Presented here are three 
reactions to the offerings of poet-authoress IMaya 
Angelou who visited the campus last month. -The Editors 



The auditorium 
was still dark 
when I arrived. 



By Kathy CImlnl 

Individual Studies Student 

from Willlamsport 



The auditorium was stili dark when I 
arrived. My eager anticipation of the even- 
ing's event had propelled me to an un- 
precendented early arrival. I watched as 
the auditorium was gradually illumined to 
a dusky threshold of light, then quickly 
found my lucky seat, number 1 1 0, where I 
had sat lo take my placement test for 
W.A.C.C. last year. Soon the room began 
to fill with people. At first, the conversa- 
tions were at a doctor's office volume, but 
as more people arrived, the volume in- 
creased until it became an excited, expec- 
tant hum. The audience was a diversifica- 
tion of black and white, young and old, 
students and non-students, professors 
and administrators; America's melting-pot 
was well represented. Finally, a fumbling 
at the curtain's closure announced that 
the show was about to begin. Following 
the introduction, Miss Angelou regally 
entered the stage to enthusiastic ap- 
plause which she graciously acknowledg- 
ed by a slight nod of her head and a ra- 
diant smile. As the applause subsided, 
she softly sang, "Alone, alone..." 
Paradoxically, she was not "alone" from 
ihe very inceplion of her perlormance 



because she immediately mesmerized, 
captivated, and contained her audience 
for the entire evening. 

Miss Angelou has a striking, com- 
manding appearance. Six feet tall, cin- 
namon tinted, stately yet agile, she 
capitalizes on her attributes by using ■ 
laughter, sadness, knowledge, truth, and 
body language to their maximum potential 
to convey her messages which she aomii- 
ted were mostly directed to women since 
"I've been female so long I'd look stupid if 
I weren't on my own side." 

The eulogizing of poetry was Miss 
Angelou's predominant theme 
throughout the lecture. She began by ad- 
dressing poetry "as company" and 
ascribing the survival of black Americans 
to their "music, literature, and poetry" 
which enabled them to "survive-thrive 
with compassion, passion, and style," 
She then proceeded, with a husky, sexy 
voice to recite poems of early black 
poets-Georgia Douglass Johnson, Anne 
Spencer, Marl Evans, and Luclle Clifon- 
encouraglng the audience to take notes 
by spelling the poets' names. 




SPOTLIGHTO Monday, April 13, 1987n9 



The auditorium 
was still dark 
when I arrived. 

CONTINUED FROM 
PRECEDING PAGE 



Her readings were dynamically 
dramatic although most of them were 
recited sotto voce. The auditorium was 
hushed during her readings. It appeared 
that the audience was almost holding its 
breath in reaction to this breathtaking per- 
sonage. 

After paying tribute to the other 
poets, Miss Angelou moved to her own 
works. "Take Time Out," she explained, 
was written for Roberta Flack and is "all 
about love.. .building bridges to reach out 
to other people." She then proceeded to a 
lighter vein with "Health Food Diner" say- 
ing that "life will offer you the opportunity 
to laugh." This was confirmed by the au- 
dience's response when their laughter 
blended with hers in understanding and 
appreciation of this poem. 

Having covered the topics of love for 
others and laughter. Miss Angelou then 
philosophized about self-love. She is a 
strong, influential advocate of molding the 
young student's mind. She said: 
"Teenagers feel that they are not lovable 
so they do not love themselves. Lack of 
self-love perpetuates cruelty." Since her 
poem, "Weekend Glory," is at)Out self- 
love, she further urged the young 
students to "turn to poetry-it will put 
starch in your backbone." 

The evening's performance was con- 
cluded by a stirring recital of a poem writ- 
ten in 154 B.C. by Terence, a black 



Roman slave. It was entitled "I Am A 
Human Being." Many people in the au- 
dience stealthily wiped the tears from 
their eyes as Miss Angelou's inspiring 
recital aroused empathetic emotions. 
When she finished the poem, she thanked 
the audience and left the stage to a stan- 
ding ovation. She returned in response to 
the applause and cordially conducted a 
bhef question and answer period. 

I had the opportunity to meet and talk 
with Miss Angelou at the reception which 
followed the recital. She was as congenial 
and charming off-stage as she had been 
on-stage. The hour was growing late, she 
had traveled all day, and yet fatigue did 
not overshadow her geniality. As she 
autographed a copy of her poem, "On 
Turning Forty," for me, we joked about its 
meaning; she admitted that she had writ- 
ten it in response to a "turning forty syn- 
drome." I politely thanked her for coming 
and invited her to return. The invitation 
was not just a socially expected remark. I 
invited her back for those who were unfor- 
tunate enough to have missed her perfor- 
mance. I sincerely encourage everyone- 
whether poetry fans or not-to attend any 
reading by Miss Angelou. She is not only 
a poet, a teacher, a philosopher; she is an 
extraordinary, gracious, charismatic, 
talented human being-who just happen- 
ed, by chance, to have been born a 
woman. 



1 OaSPOTLIQHTDMonday, April 13, 1987 



The audience at the latest Women's 
Series event was privileged to take a 
thought-provoking journey through the 
many faceted world ot Maya Angelou; 
consummate communicator, gifted poet, 
talented author and song lyricist, per- 
former, educator, singer, dancer, and 
friendly down-home lady. 

The Academic Center Auditorium fill- 
ed to near capacity last Tuesday evening 
as (i<s. Angelou emerged from the velvet 
curtain to open with a song in her distinc- 
tive deep voice - a female version of 
James Earl Jones' oratorical bass. 

Inspiring us with the words, "The 
essence of poetry is its ability to be com- 
pany," she let the audience cozy up to the 
works ot various nineteenth century 
female poets such as Georgia Douglas 
Johnson's "I Want to Die While You Love 
Me," Anne Spencer's "Letter to My 
Sister," and the works of Marl Evans, 
Luclle Clifton, and Helene Johnson. She 
said that poetry". ..is given to all of us to 
think with passion, with compassion, with 
humor, with style," and further that . 
"Poetry is magical, mystical, lyrical, 
musical." She offered these words of 
wisdom on poetry from her grandmother: 
"Poetry will put starch In your backbone." 



By Ellen Auchter 

General Studies Student 

from Wllllamsport 



The audience 
at the latest 
Women's 
Series event 
was 
privileged... 



Angelou delighted us with vivid por- 
trayals of her own poetry: the sassy 
"Weekend Glory," "Take Time Out" 
which had been set to music and record- 
ed by Roberta Flack, and the hilarious 
"Health Food Diner." She used ex- 
pressive gestures throughout, making for 
an entertaining performance. 

She shared poignant stories from her 
character-forging childhood in Stamps, 
Arkansas. She shared anecdotes from 
her travels throughout the world. She 
shared from her experiences performing 
with James Earl Jones, Cicily Tyson, and 
Richard Pryor. She also offered the 
wisdom that a step to self-actualiztion Is 
self-love and apropos this topic, gave us 
this African proverb: "Be careful when a 
naked person offers you a shirt' sug- 
gesting that one cannot give love to 
another when he/she lacks self-love. 

After a standing ovation, she closed 
with the stirring words of the Negro Na- 
tional Anthem by James Weldon 
Johnson: "We have come over a way that 
with tears has been watered/ We have 
come, treading our path through the 
blood of the slaughtered." If you missed 
the performance-your loss, but if you 
didn't. Join me in bestowing one last ac- 
colade on Maya Angelou-she's got stylel 



It was a cool, 
clear evening 
with a hint of 
Spring in the 
air. 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, April 13. 1987n1 1 



It was a cool, clear evening with a 
flint of spring in tfie air. Tfie auditorium fill- 
ed witfi students, faculty, community peo- 
ple wtio awaited tfie entrance of ttie 
esteemed guest. A glorifying introduction 
witfi a long list of accomplistiments set 
tfie stage for fier reading. Entered a tall, 
boldly-featured woman in a red and black 
dress, applauding and being applauded. 
"All alone, all alone" rang out musically in 
a deep, clear voice greeting ttie audience; 
everyone could sense tier strong 
presence immediately and tier energy 
pervaded ttie evening, (ylaya Angelou, 
author and poet, was here to "do 
Williamsport" and do it she did! 

Angelou filled the evening with 
poetry and songs, quoted mainly from 
female black poets, about love: romantic 
love, self love, and love of life. After some 
humorous small talk about her flight and 
our community college, she gave her 
listeners insight into her convictions; she 
is a black female and she is proud. She 
claimed that poetry and literature have 
allowed blacks to "survive, thrive with 
passion, compassion, humor, and style" 
- all of which shone through in her per- 
sonality as she presented a moving 
reading of the poems. As for being a 
feminist, she stated, "I've been female a 
long time, why shouldn't I be on my own 
side." 

She chose many poets to read; Ann 
Spencer, Lucile Clifton, Georgia Douglass 
Johnson, Langston Hughes, and many 
others; she urged her audience to read 
works by these and other writers. Each 
poem revealed more about this dynamic, 
phenomenal woman. While her choices 
focused on love, all poems centered, 
also, on her personality. For example, 
"Health Food Diner" told about her love 



By Heidi Proctor | 
General Studies Studisnt 
from Williamsportl 



for eating and smoking and a "Woman's 
Work Song" showed her concern with the 
everyday plight of women. "I Really Hate 
to Lose Something" revealed one attitude 
drawn from black culture and "I Will Die 
but That Is All I Will Do for Death" reveal- 
ed her passion for living. 

Love remairied'the major focus; she 
stressed that young people should realize 
that they are lovable, and that individuals 
must love themselves before they can of- 
fer anything to anyone else. She also 
made a point of telling her audience that 
all the world is before them to explore. 
She quoted from Terence in her closing: 
"I am a human being; nothing human can 
be alien to me." 

The audience may have been disap- 
pointed that Angelou did not quote more 
of her own work. The presentation may 
also have been a little less captivating to 
those who were strongly opposed to her 
feminine and racial convictions. Yet 
anyone would have found it difficult not to 
enjoy the delightful, emotional reading or 
to laugh at her humorous insights. 

Since opportunities are rare to ex- 
perience such guests as Maya Angelou, I 
consider myself lucky not to have missed 
out this time. Her appearance encouraged 
me to read her books and also to invest 
some time in looking for the poets she 
quoted. I would strongly encourage 
anyone who has a free evening next time 
a talent such as lylaya Angelou decides to 
"do Williamsport" to take advantage of 
the enriching experience 



1 2DSPOTLIQHTnMond«y, April 13, 1987 




ACCEPTING AWARD Is Deana Hall. 
With her are Lloyd F. Burson Jr., 
manager of Central Supply at Divine 



Providence Hospital, and Sister 
dementia Rodgers, director of staff 
development at the hospital. 



Health occupations students 
attend convention; award won 



Contributed By 
Janet Barbour 

•ocondiry hsatth occupations Instructor 

The students from the secondary 
health occupations program attended the 
annual Health Occupations Students of 
Annerica (H.O.S.A.) convention at the 
Host Farms Resort In Lancaster. 

Attending the convention from the 
College's H.O.SA. chapter were Kitrina 
Chaapel, Ann Looney, Cherri Castle, 
Jayne Huntley, all of Canton; Deana Hall, 
of Wiiliamsport, and Hallle Farrar, of Mon- 
tgomery, 

The students competed against more 
than 500 students from other vocational 



schools across the state in nursing assis- 
tant skills, prepared speech, and job 
skills. 

Deana Hall, a Wiiliamsport Area High 
School student, received the first place 
award for her demonstration of "prepar- 
ing a Gown Pack for the Operating 
Room" in the nursing assisted related 
table-top competiton. She was presented 
with a trophy at the state H.O.S.A. ban- 
quet. 

The delegate to the convention was 
Cherri Castle and the alternate was Jayne 
Huntley, both from Canton. 

Ivls. Janet Barbour is the chapter ad- 
viser. 



SPOTLIQHTDMonday, April 13, 1987n1 3 




Participants In the Third Annual Mld- 
Atlantlc Student Landscape Field Day 
Included (front row from left) Elizabeth 
Call, Paula Zanollnl, Richard Bolton, 
John Oleksa, Brian Ropp, Sue Qrleco; 



(standing, from left) Maria MahalskI, 
Jim Corle, Gary Brungard, Barbie 
Myers, Carol Knipe, Dan Sneath, Linda 
Dietz, Karen PetroskI, Frank Berns, 
Todd Bacon, and Jerry Leonard. 



STORY, NEXT PAGE 




IWt DISCOUNT 
TO STUDENTS ft FACULTY 

(ID REQUIRED) 



Huffman's 
Office Equipment Co. 

209-213 East 1 hird Street 

Williamsport, PA 17701 

Phone (717) 326-2481 



,—,.... —.,—,.—,.—.—.,.—,,■—.—— — I m-'-tti— nrrarm— -ni 



1 AoSPOTLIGHTDMonday, April 13, 1987 



Landscape/nursery students 
earn first place at field day 



Fifteen landscape/nursery 

technology, two floriculture and two out- 
doorpower equipment students par- 
ticipated in ttie ttiird annual Mid-Atlantic 
Student Landscape Field Day field at 
Temple University at Ambler. 

Ten colleges from New York, Penn- 
sylvania, Maryland, Virginia and Ofiio, in- 
cluding some four-year programs, were 
scheduled to compete in 16 different 
events, according to Richard J, 
Weilminster, associate professor of hor- 
ticulture. 

The following list names each event, 
the students who participated as well as 
their finishing position and point totals for 
the team total. The events were very 
competitive but the LNT team proved best 
overall - coming in first with a combined 
point total of 170 which is thirty points 
ahead of the second place team. 

Many landscape contractors attend 
this event each year and interest has been 
intense in the graduating students of the 
LNT program. Currently, the LNT job 
board lists approximately 90 jobs for the 
graduating second-year students 

Several other first-year LNT students 
attend as observers for next year. The 
W.A.C.C. team placed fourth in the first 
year of competition and second last year. 
The organizers of the field day are 
extremely interested in holding the fourth 
annual event at the natural resources (ear- 
th/science) campus next year, i he date 
for next year's competition has been ten- 
tatively set for April 10th. 

Faculty Advisors Richard J 
Weilminster, Dennis E. Fink, Dennis P. 
Skinner and Dennis H. Rice attended and 
helped students to prepare for the events. 
Weed, turf and seed identification, 
Carol J. Knipe of S. Williamsport, first 
Interior plant identification, Todd N. 
Bacon of Towanda, first place; Karen 
M. Petroski of Honesdale, fourth place. 

Surveying, Barbie A. Myers , Dan 
Sneath, and Bryan G. Ropp, all of 
Williamsport, fifth place. 



Tree Climbing, John Oleksa, third 
place, Dan Sneath, ninth place. 

Pruning, Gary R. Brungard and 
James T. Corle, both of Williamsport, tied 
at seventh place. 

Balling and Burlaping, Bryan G. Ropp 
Williamsport, sixth place, Gerald J. Led- 
nard of Pottsville, eighth place. 

Brick patio construction, Gary R. 
Brungard of Williamsport, first place, 
Bryan G. Ropp, third place. 

Outdoor plant identification. Todd N. 
Bacon, eighth place, James T. Corle. 

Insect and Disease identification, 
Karen M. Petroski, second placfe, Paula 
A. Zanolini, fourth place. 

Landscape construction estimation, 
John Oleksa, second place, Karen M. 
Petroski, fourth place. 

Landscape design problem, James 
T. Corle. 

Sales Presentation, Richard L. Boiton 
of Turbotville, second place, Linda K. 
Dietz of Waterville, seventh place, 
first place. Rick Trees, second place. 

People Management, Richard L. 
Bolton, second place. 

Flower arranging, Elizabeth A. Call, 
second place, Maria Mahalski, eighth 
place. 

Basic Botany, Susan G. Grieco, 
eighth place, Francis A. Berns of Mon- 
toursville.ninth place. 

Observers 
Brian Wick 

James E. Goliub, Mohnton 
Sharon Hernandez, Bethlehem 
Nancy Whitsel 

Gregory A. Aibanese, Wind Gap 
Steven D. Singer, Harrisburg 
Peter W. Kunsch. Phoenixville 
Joe Nonakowski 
Fredrick A. Sanders, Berwick 
Valerie Petroski 
Beth Berns 

Faculty Advisors 
Richard J. Weilminster 
Dennis E. Fink 
Dennis P. Skinner 
Dennis Rice 



Ballet here 
in April 

A perlormance by the Wilkes- 
Barre Ballet Theatre Company will be 
given at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 25, 
according to Ms. JoAnn R. Fremiotti , 
College activities coordinator. 

The performance is sponsored by 
the College, the Young Women's 
Christian Association, and the Greater 
Wiliiamsport Area Arts Council. It will 
be in the Academic Center Auditorium. 

Special workshops will be held. 
Workshops for children will be from 1 
to 1 :30 p.m. Master class (dance stu- 
dent and teachers) will be from 1 :30 to 
3 p.m., Ms. Fremiotti said. 

The workshops will be in the 
YWCA the same day. Free preregistra- 
tion is required. 

Also being held are be auditions 
for the Wilkes-Barre Ballet Theatre 
Company. The auditions are open to 
anyone interested. 

Tickets for the performance are $3 
for children under 1 2 and $5 dollars for 
others. 

Tickets are available in Room 1 08, 
Gym, the Wiliiamsport YWCA, B&S 
Picture Frames, Inc., Caboose 
Restaurant, and Cheers, Wiliiamsport, 
and from the Lexicon Bookstore in 
Lewisburg. For further information call 
327-4763, Ext. 7269 or 322-4637. 



Cillo's 
College Comer 

PHONE 322-1321 

1100 W. Third St. 

(Next to the Academic Center) 

HOURS* 

Mod. thm Than. 

7:30 a.m. to i p.m. 

Fildaj, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 





,^_ 


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SPOTLIQHTD Monday, April 13, 


1987D 


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©Edward Julius Collegiate CW84-19 

ANSWER NEXT PAGE 

ArRO<5<; *^ Bandleader Shaw 12 Set down 

48 Dross 13 Churcfi projection 

1 Vipers 49 "A from Hong 18 Driving places 

5 Despots Kong" 22 finger 

10 FOR's dog 52 Addictions 25 Erroll Garner 
H Sunken fence or 55 Years; It. tune 
laugh 56 question 26 Sky-blue 

15 Spartan serf 58 The Brothers 27 Scrooge's word 

16 Rush'order abbrevi- 59 Word in Jane Austen 29 Concerninq 
ation title animals 

17 Sooner or later 60 Alliance initials 30 Misplay 

19 Maui garlands 61 Sioux 31 Speed 

20 Healed 62 Senator Kefauver 33 Zero-dimensional 

21 Hudson River view 63 Killed figures (abbr ) 

23 Minerals 34 What a DH uses, in 

24 In regard to DOWN sports 

25 " Bank Account" 36 Study plants 

27 Auction term 1 Attention-getter 37 Separate 

28 Stunned 2 Except 38 poodle 

32 Suffix for social 3 Extraordinary occur- 40 Here 

33 Apartment rence 43 Genie offerings 

34 In front of 4 Dee 44 Winged 

35 Tan producer 5 Fall sounds 45 Ship rooms 

38 1040. for one 6 Azov, for one 47 Succinct 

39 Soldiers 7 Joyful words to a 48 Footwear 

40 Something to win in debtor 49 Dear one: It. 
cards 8 Movie Charlie Chan, 50 "Step !"' 

41 Card game Winters 51 Word in the "golden 

42 Gossipy woman 9 Work with hair rule" 

(Yiddish) 10 Shakespearean 53 Actress Sharon 

43 Twist knight 54 Street sign 

44 Squirrel treat U On the Tyrrhenian 57 Half a fly 



1 BnSPOTUQHTDMondiy, April 13, 1987 

Carolyn Kizer 
to appear 
April 21 

Carolyn Kizer, Pulitzer prize win- 
ner tor poetry In 1985, poetry teacher, 
and poet-in-residence, will appear at 
the College lor a workshop and a 
reading on Tuesday, April 21 , accor- 
ding to lyls. JoAnn R. Fremiotti, coor- 
dinator of College activities. 

The workshop about Kizer's work 
will be held at 2 am. in the Profes- 
sional Development Center. There is 
no charge for the workshop, but reser- 
vations must be made a week in ad- 
vance, according to Ms. Fremiotti. 

Ms. Kizer's reading/lecture is en- 
titled, "The Poet's Voice", and will be 
held at 7 p.m. in the Academic Center 
Auditorium. 

Tickets for the reading/lecture and 
the reception which follows are $2, ac- 
cording to Ms. Fremiotti. Admission Is 
free to College students and staff with 
a valid ID. 




Weight loss teams 
pressing on... off? 

With only two weeks remaining in the Col- 
lege's weight loss program, participants 
have lost a combined total of 619'/2 
pounds, according to Mrs. Janet R. 
Querimit, College nurse. 

The combined team total goal is 
1 ,049'/2 pounds. 

Commented (mused?) the nurse: 
"While some members have done ex- 
tremely well, we seem to have several 
sleepers in the group. Are they ever going 
to get started?" 



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BENSONA 



V^us 



Corner of 3rd and Maynard Sts. 



I ALWAYS OPEN 
I ALL NIGHT 

I HOLIDAYS 

I AND SUNDAYS 

!L a m , a 





SPOTLIGHTOMondty, April 13, 1987d1 7 



Job Ops 



This Information Is sup- 
pllod by the Collage Advise- 
ment and Career Services 
Center. Inquiries should be 
directed to that office which Is 
In the Learning Resources 
Center. 



EMPLOYMENT 

SPRING 

GRADUATES 



R P Machinery, P. O. Box 507, Jersey Shore. Pa. has an 
opening for an entry level welder. Would be doing all facets of 
steel fabrication in an A1SC certified shop. $4.50 to start. 

Stop by and fill out an application. 

Blue Ridge Haven West, 770 Poplar Church Road, Cannp Hill, 
Pa. 1 701 1 , has 2 openings for dietetic technicians. One is for 
a dietary supervisor, the other Is for an assistant manager. 
Send a resume to David Zaiek, dietary service director call 

him at (71 7) 763-7070. Ext. 21 0. 

Rauby's Garage, 21 Broad St., Phillipsburg, N.J. 08865 has 
an opening for a diesel mechanic. Send a resume to Ray 

Raub. 

EIFab Corporation, Dallas, Texas, has sent applications to the 
Advisement Center for tool design technology applicants. 

They can be picked up In Room 1 57. LRC. 

Adcomm Inc., 1 31 Hamilton St., Allentown, Pa. 1 81 01 has an 
opening for a graphic arts graduate for press and layout. Send 

a resume to Richard MIkllz, manager. 

Akron Family Dental, 112 S. Seventh St., Akron, Pa., 17501 
-10 miles from Lancaster - has two openings for a dental 
hyglenlst. One full-time, one part-time. Full-time is four days a 
week. New, up-to-date equipment. Would have an assistant. 
Send a resume to Dr. John Dotwalt or call him at (717) 

859-201 3. 

Precision Components Corp., Box Ml 01, York, Pa. 17405 
has two openings for precision grinder trainees (machinist 
general). Would work 4 to midnight Monday through Friday. 
$9.24 hourly. Send a resume to Hal L. Banks Jr., or call (71 7) 

848-1 1 26 Ext. 470 lor an application. 

Pennsylvania House Inc. North 10th St., Lewisburg, Pa. 
17837 has an opening for a fourth semester machine tool 
technology student to program CNC equipment. Send a 
r esume to Clare Kleharl, director of personnel services. 
Kerry A. Uhler & Associates, 1 40 W. High St., Bellefonte, Pa. 
16823 has an opening for a part-time civil engineering 
technology graduate who would do some surveying and 
some drafting. Call Mr. Uhler at (81 4) 355-0432. 



1 SoSPOTLrOHTDMonday, April 13, 1987 



EMPLOYMENT 

SPRING 

GRADUATES 



Benton Foundry. RD 2, Box 110. Benton, Pa. 17814 tias an 
opening for a construction carpentry graduate for ttieir pattern 
stiop. using woodworking tools. High school graduates will 
receive $4.75 an hour, college graduates receive $6 to $7 an 

hour. Send a resume to Tim Brown, vice president. 

Merit Machinery Inc.. 2311 Babcock Blvd.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
15237, has an opening for a salesman for CAD/CAM CNC 
machinery in the eastern half of Pennsylvania - preferably 
from the Allentown, Lancaster, Reading area. Persons need 
to have these backgrounds in order to sell them. Send a 
resume to Bart Weaver or call him at (800) 242-0578 for more 

In formation. __^ 

M. S. Yearsley & Sons, 1 1 4 E. Market St., Box 539, West 
Chester, Pa. 19381, has a full-time opening for an outdoor 
power equipment graduate to repair all types of equipment in 
their garden center. Send a resume to Denise Yearsley or call 

her at (21 5) 696-2990 for more information. 

Grove Associates, Engineers & Surveyors, 622 Stoney Creek 
Drive, P. 0. Box 1 36, Dauphin, Pa. 1 701 8 has an opening for 
a surveying technician with drafting experience. Send a 

r esume. 

Robert W. Ferrell Jr., P.E., Engineering & Surveying, 1305 
Washington Blvd., Williamsport, Pa. 17701 has an opening 
for civil engineering technology graduates for surveying and 
drafting. Call Kenneth C. Larson, Jr., P.E., R.S., at (717) 
323-6603 or send him a resume. 



JOE MIGNANO'S SUB SHOP 

Corner of 2nd & Maynard 
PHONE 323-7443 

One Block from W.A.C.C. 

DAILY SPECIALS 

Hours: Moo.Sil. II i.m. lo 9 p.m. CloKd Sundiy 




Monday 


Regular Sub 


Whole 


$1.70 


Cosmo 


$2.10 


Tuesday 


Meatball 


Whole 


$1.85 


Cosmo 


$2.30 


Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 


Turkey 
Ham 

Tuna 
Cheese Steak 


Whole 
Whole 
Whole 
Whole 


$1.50 
$1-90 
$1.80 
$2,50 


Cosmo 
Cosmo 
Cosmo 
Cosmo 


$1.95 
$2.35 
$2.25 
$2.95 



•Now! The BIG JOE HERO 18" 

$4,20 WHOLE $2,10 HALF 

•Subs All Handmade to Order 

•Homemade Meatballs & Sauce 

•Hot Sausage Sandwiches and Chili Dogs 



SPOTLIQHTDMonday. April 13, 1987n1 ff 

Alpha Carb Enterprises, RO 3, Box 270. Leechburg, Pa. 
15656, has an opening for a machinist generai to operate 

machines. Send a resume to the attention of Sherri, 

A. R. industries, RD 1, Box 38C, Emporium, Pa. 15834. is a 
wholesaie transmission outlet. They are looking for someone 
who i<nows the workings of and can rebuild transmissions. 

Send a resume to Alan Ramsey. 

Regester Chevrolet Inc., I^ain Street, Thompson Town. Pa. 
1 7094. has an opening for an automotive mechanic. Send a 

r esume to John Regester. 

Central Penn Printing Co., 1505 N. Atherton St., State Col- 
lege. Pa. 16803, has an opening for a fourth semester 
graphic arts student for general printing. Send a resume to 
l^r. Dreibelbis. 



CAMPUS 
RECRUITING 



Giles & Ransome, of Bensalem, Pa. - a Caterpillar dealer 
north of Philadelphia - will be interviewing diesel mechanic 
and service and operation of heavy construction equipment 
graduates on campus on Friday, April 24, Sign up with Mrs. 
Elmer in the Placement Office before tomorrow, April 1 4. 
Den Tech Inc., of Lancaster, will be interviewing engineering 
drafting, tool design and industrial drafting graduates on cam- 
pus on Wednesday, April 22. Sign up with l^rs. Elmer in the 
Advisement Center by tomorrow, April 14, and bring a 

r esume to the interview. 

Ivlutual of Omaha from Williamsport will be in the Learning 
Resources Center, Room 205A, to talk with business 
management and retail management graduates for manage- 
ment trainee and sales representatives. They will also ad- 
minister a one-hour, 1 5-minute aptitude test. Starting salary 
is about $20,000. Sign up with ly/lrs. Elmer in the Advisement 

Center by April 22 if you are interested. 

The Department of Energy from Washington, D.C., will be 
talking with secretarial graduates on Tuesday, April 21 . A 
group meeting Is scheduled at noon in the Learning 
Resources Center Conference Room - Room 205A. Testing 
is scheduled for 1 :30 p.m. in the Academic Center, Room 

403. 

Sears Roebuck &Co., 19 E. Seventh St., Bloomsburg, Pa. has 
openings for part-time outdoor power equipment repair per- 
son and an appliance repair person as well as a small ap- 
pliance repair person. Will get discounts on merchandise and 
other benefits. Stop by and talk with Dale Strauser, service 
manager, 



SUMMER 
INTERNSHIP 



White Beauty View Resort, RD 2, Box 288C, Greentown, Pa. 
18426, has an opening for a food and hospitality summer In- 
tern. Would be working in the downstairs kitchen which has a 
family style menu. Call Kate at (71 7) 857-0234, Ext. 222, or 
send her a resume. 



20DSPOTLIOHTDMond»y, April 13, 1987 

Symposium 
winners listed 



The names of the winners at the 
Business Education Sympsosium that 
was held at the College on Friday, April 3 
were given in a written release by Paul W. 
Goldfeder, state advisor of Phi Beta 
Lambda. 

Placement in the category of ad- 
vancd bookkeeping was: first, Heather 
Welshans, Jersey Shore; second, Stacey 
Cropf, Jersey Shore; third, Elaine Helm, 
Shikellamy; fourth, Shawn Knotts, Dan- 
ville, and fifth, Lois Shuey, Pottsville. 

In Beginning Bookkeeping, place- 
ment was: first, Margaret Paiko, Central; 
second, Tim Haugh, East Lycoming; third, 
Geraid Bower, Williamsport; fourth, An- 
drea Weaver, Danville, and fifth, Lynn 
Hembury, Sullivan. 

Business and economic competency 
placement was: first, Michelle Frantz, 
Williamsport; second, Rebecca Sheets, 
Sullivan; third, Cheryl Wagner, 
Bloomsburg; fourth, Matt Hane, 
Wlllllamsport, and fifth, Timothy Seip, Pot- 
tsville. 

The winners in the business English 
competition were: first. Tammy Ulmer, 
Jersey Shore; second, JoEllen Cowfer, 
State College; third, Patti Mitchell, 
Weilsboro; fourth, Lynn Shaw, Shamokin, 
and fifth, Wayne Kishbaugh, Wyalusing. 
Winning in business law were: first, 
Renee Erdley, Montoursvilie; second. Bill 
Fanquet,' Williamsport; third, Devin 
Eckley, Newport; fourth, Jodi Hawkins, 
Jersey Shore, and fifth. Rick Onisick, 
Bloomsburg. 

Business mathematics winners were: 
first, Karen Kramer, Shikellamy; second, 
David Kirkendall, East Lycoming; third. 
Colleen Otis, Wyalusing; fourth, Scott 
Monro, Jersey Shore, and fifth, Barry 
Kreidler, Jersey Shore. 

Winners in business projects display 
were: first, Troy High School; second, 
Weilsboro High School; third, Milton High 
School; fourth, Sullivan High School, and 
fifth, Penns Valley High School. 

PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE 




For Information 

abont 

The Practical 

Nursing Program 

...Stop By 

ACC 420 

or 

CaU 326-3761, 

Ext. 7324 



, Symposium, 
winners 
listed 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, April 13, 1987d21 



CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE 



Winning in computer programming 
were: first, Anthony Good, Williamsport; 
second, David Christini, Towanda; third, 
Alfonso Bermejo, Montgomery; fourth, 
Jennifer Gresh, State Coliege, and fifth, 
Travis Pruyne, SRU. 

Advanced data processing winners 
were: first, Kerry Reed, Troy; second, 
Brian Michael, Jersey Shore; third, Ed 
Abrams, Towanda, and fourth. Randy 
Sees, Danville. 

Winners in beginning data process- 
ing were: first, Russ Gardener, Jersey 
Shore; second, Michael Mullican, Wyalus- 
ing; third, Branda Ghaner, State College; 
fourth, Stacy Bowers, Newport, and fifth, 
Leann Koch, Williamsport. 

Filing placement was: first, Christine 
Watson, Chief Logan; second. Tammy 
Bender, Williamsport; third, Phylann 
Nemeth, Towanda; fourth. Missy Porter, 
Wyalusing, and fifth, Stacey Boyer, 
Milton. 

Placement in job search skills was: 
first, Sandy Yurgatis, Wyalusing; second, 
Christine Witherite, Penns Valley; third, 
Nicole Shively; fourth. Kin Friel, 
Williamsport, and fifth, Maggie Moran, 
Pottsville. 

Winners in on-line basic programm- 
ing were: first, Carl Smith, Wyalusing; se- 
cond, Brian Rinker, North East Bradford; 
third, Richard Daves, Danville; fourth, Jim 
Thuotte, Troy, and fifth, Kurt Zettlemoyer, 
Towanda. 

Sales talks winners were: first, Cathy 
Moore, Jersey Shore; second, Karen 
Trego, Shamokin; third, Shawn Little, 
Newport; fourth, Angela Baysore, Milton, 
and fifth. Shannon Sharpies, Danville. 



Winners in advaced shorthand were: 
first, Chris Delafield, State College; se- 
cond, Lisa Cillo, Jersey Shore; third, Kris- 
ty Wise, Williamsport; fourth, Karen Rob- 
bins, Danville, and Karen Trego, 
Shamokin. 

Winning in beginning shorthand 
were: first Robin Hoban, East Lycoming; 
second, Stacey Mensch. Bloomsburg; 
third, Susan Kelley, Wyalusing; fourth, 
Misti Brown, Troy, and fifth. Tammy 
Ulmer, Shamokin. 

Winners in spelling were: first, Jodi 
Warburton, Towanda; second, Brian 
Rinker, North East Bradford; third, Rita 
Markle, Shamokin; fourth. Tammy Cole, 
SRU, and fifth. Dawn Daily, Williamsport. 

Advanced typewriting winners were: 
first, Patty McClarren, State College; se- 
cond, Annette Swain, Townada; third, Joy 
Womelsdorf, East Lycoming; fourth, Jen- 
nifer Strolanoff, Chief Logan, and fifth, 
Jamie Paul, Danville. 

Beginning typewriting winners were: 
first, Elizabeth White, Williamsport; se- 
cond, Eric Shaffer, Montgomery; third. 
Colleen Otis, Wyalusing; fourth, Vicky 
Clink, North East Bradford, and fifth, Bar- 
bara Schoch. 

Winners in vocabulary were: first, 
Becky Bower, Bishop Neumann; second, 
Tari Wisecarver, Wyalusing; third, Craigt 
Sullivan, Towanda; fourth, Tonya Boob, 
Jersey Shore, and fifth, Tara Christini, 
Sullivan. 

Winners in word processing were: 
first, Becky Overdorf, Jersey Shore; se- 
cond, Frank King, Montgomery; third, 
Greg Bennett, Sullivan, fourth, Andrea 
Dorkoskl, Shamokin, and fifth, Chris 
Campbell, Athens. 



22DSPOTUQHTaMondiy, April 13, 1987 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

Attention All Students, Faculty, and Staff 

All padlocks will be removed from all lockers on campus the 
weak of May 4 to 8 so the lockers can be cleaned and repaired. 

This Includes lockers on Main Campus, at the Aviation Campus, 
and at the Earth Sciences Center. THERE WILL BE NO EXCEPTIONS. 

ALL ITEMS LEFT IN LOCKERS WILL BE DISPOSED OF. 

-The Chief of Security 



GIRLS Incoming, first-semester... 

j\ u w* •♦! continuing students.... 

.Don t wait. any female students... 

CALL TODAY 

326-7509 • 322-6335 • 327-1961 

Roan Realty 
student housing 

Private Rooms 

Security 

Full Laundry Facilities 

100% Maintenance 

Cable TV 

Utilities Provided 

Completely Furnished 

$700 per Semester 

$150 Deposit Required "^ 

Note: This house has been completely remodeled! 
Do yourself a favor and check it out! 



SPOTLIGHTDMonday, April 13, 1987a23 . 

Dr. Sahn presents paper -j 

Dr. Richard Sahn, instructor of sociology and psychology, presented a paper entitled t 

"Transvestism: A Multi-faceted Phenomenon" at the annual conference of the Pennsylvania 
Sociological Society at Lycoming College on Saturday, Ivlarch 28. 

Sociology instructors from colleges throughout the state took part in the session dealing 
with norms, attitudes, and perceptions, Sahn said. j 



CAMP STAFF WANTED 
Camp Staff - Coed summer camp, 
Wayne County, Pa. Includes salary. 



room and board, and laundry service. 
1 8 or older. Call collect 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.: 

201-276-0565. fadvr; 



WOMEN'S FORUM BROWN BAG LUNCH 
- LARUE MONTAYNE, ED. D., clinical psychologist, is speaking on MEDIATION: 
AN ALTERNATIVE TO THE COURTROOM. 

This will be of particular interest to individuals considering separation or 
divorce. 

Thursday, April 23 

11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

ACC 403 

Mr. Montayne Is volunteering his time. Let's encourage him with our atten- 

-dance. {Credit for S.M.I.L.E. participants) Everyone is welcome. Bring a friendl 

-Announcement prepered and submitted by Cherl Hilton 

(SPOTLIGHT CAMPUS SERVICE COURTESY ANNOUNCEMENT] 



IM 

Recreation 
Week... 



Ask 
Margot 
Bayor 
in the 
Gym 
About It! 



j Opan 'til midnit* dally 

IBARRY'S 



[BROOKLYN STYLE 



} "Save-A-Bttck Specials 



Across from College's EisI Parking Lot 
234 PARK STREET 
PHONE 323-3«3 




ROOMS 
FOR RENT 



p H H I VALUABLE COUPON! ■ m h ■ 

Ifree piiiai 1 



I Buy any size Utile Caesais 
I Original round pizza at regukr 
price, get the identical pizza 
FREE with this coupon. 



GOLDEN STRIP 
GIANT PLAZA 

327-8600 




W.A.C.C. itudenU Ufe 
■ddltioiul 10% onl; wUh 
itadcnt I.O. ud lUi id. 



One coupon per customer. Cany out only. At participating locations. 



24DSPOTLIQHTDMonday, April 13, 1987 

PBL conference to be in Anaheim; 
seminar scholarships avaiiabie 

The National Leadership Conference for Phi Beta Lambda will be held in Anaheim, Calif, 
from July 1 to July 8, according to Paul W. Goidfeder, state PBL adviser, who plans to at- 
tend. 

Phi Beta Lambda members interested in attending the conference may contact 
Goidfeder "as soon as possible", he said. 

Goidfeder also reported that scholarships are available to the "Operation Enterprise" 
1 0-day seminar. The seminar is about working together, decision-making, and communica- 
tions. 

The deadline lor application is April 30. Only active PBL members who have their na- 
tional and state dues paid are eligible to attend, Goidfeder said. 

There are four dates for seminars: June 3 to 1 2, June 1 4 to 23, June 25 to 30, and Aug. 
16 10 21. 



Single Parent Student? 


Cillo's 
College Comer 


For more information, call... 
Cheri Hilton or Patty Gordon 
at Extension 7449 


BREAKFAST SPECIAL 
THIS WEEK 

EGG ON MUFFIN 






60- Reg. 80* 

LUNCH SPECIAL 








Lunch • 


THIS WEEK 


r\i'-^ 


Dinner • 


HALF TUNA SUB 

$1 .60 Reg. $1 .90 




Sunday Brunch (10:00-2:00) 

Imported Beer 

Deli Sandwiches & Salads 

Gourmet Soups • 

Homemade Desserts • 


Pliy LUCKY NUMBERS 
AND WIN A HALF SUB 

Four Winners Each Week! 

HOURS 
Mon. thrn Than. 
7:30 i.m. to 6 p.m. 


M 


Welcome College Students 
Court & Willow Cafe 


Fridiy, 7:30 t.m. to 4 p.m. 

'PHONE 322-1321 




326 Court Street 
322-0135 


1100 W. Third SI. 

(Next to the Actdemic Center)